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NURB
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The Dixon Ticonderoga Pencil

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From what I can tell, production began around 1870. The Dixon company began in 1795, however. Looks like they quite producing in the US in 1999, but they still make them.
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yo
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that is a long run on the old number 2 there.

The Converse All Star has been in production in one for or another since 1917. It was updated slightly in 1922 after input from basketball player Chuck Taylor when it became the Converse Chuck Taylor All Star. There have been updates, iterations, factory changes, and countless CMF variations but the last it is built around and the overall BOM and production techniques have largely gone unchanged.
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I once heard a talk by a Professor Hesketh who proposed the most successful product of all time was the stone age hand axe. Made continuously for something like (from memory) over 2 million years, on every continent, without any change in materials, and a gradual refinement in shape, he suggested no other product in history had done more for humans. And here's the kicker; when the product was eventually discarded both it and all of the waste materials used in production are completely benign in the environment.
800px-Acheuleanhandaxes.jpg
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ralphzoontjens
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I bet apes have used sticks for eating ants longer - very sustainable utensil.
We are talking about commercialized products here though rather than objects for use.

Wedgwood Queen's Ware was originally created in 1762, later sold to Queen Charlotte hence the name, and some of the items are still produced today, for a meagre $4-5,000 each. That makes these products 256 years old. Wedgwood was popular and a status symbol over here in Europe up to about a decade ago, now nobody wants it anymore though. Some of the designs are very original, playing with the possibilities of the material (ceramic). Almost like Dutch Design. The company was ahead of its time because it was design and brand-driven already in the 18th century.
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there is something to be said about these products that stand the test of time.

I couldn't find any history on these, but both of these Scotch tape dispensers have been in production for as long as I can remember. While not held in the parthenon of design, there is something to be said about their nonchalance. I think it would be pretty awesome to design something that has quietly been in production for decades. Something that almost everyone has, uses, and really never thinks about.
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If you ever find yourself in Minnesota, and you're able to get a tour of the 3M innovation lab, I highly recommend it. I only wish I could have had more time there...
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from the core77 front page today: https://www.core77.com/posts/81828/Grea ... ock-Device

I guess put this one in the "if it aint broke, don't fix it" category? :-)
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rkuchinsky
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yo wrote:
December 18th, 2018, 4:38 pm
from the core77 front page today: https://www.core77.com/posts/81828/Grea ... ock-Device

I guess put this one in the "if it aint broke, don't fix it" category? :-)
I have (of course) a Brannock device (bought new) and also the vintage Ritz stick (garage sale find) in that article. I don’t know if I’ve ever used it more than once. Too bad kinda useless since every brand sizes/grades/fits differently. It’s a super hefty piece of kit though and I always remember being fit for shoes in it when I was a kid. Something tells me they don’t have those at most foot lockers today. With online shopping most likely it will be extinct soon enough.

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savage
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How about instruments? The iconic Les Paul comes to mind. Started in 1952 and still going today. Les really nailed the shape from the beginning. ( Guitarist will probably bark at this saying the new ones are not even close to the models in the 50s 60s) :)

https://reverb.com/news/a-les-paul-from ... -1952-1960
2018 vs 1952
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The Bialetti coffee maker was invented in 1933 by Alfonso Bialetti. Story has it, he sold them here and there at markets but people didn't really pick up on it, almost making the product a flop. His young nephew preached the importance of branding, drawing his uncle up a little a cartoon Italian guy, which is still the logo they use today.
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The Weber Kettle Grill, invented in 1952, has stayed true to the original mass produced shape pretty well. They still sell a series devoted to this architecture. It's interesting to note that it was inspired by buoys. He actually made the first out of one. That just shows the value of re-purposing.
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Not only have they been making these since 1963, they have to still play nice with each other year after year. I can grab my legos from childhood and they will connect right up to my nephews.
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In my view, the old Tupperware from flexible polyethylene is still the best. They still sell the Wonderlier series which started in 1954. I wonder if they still use the same molds. But the products definitely last. I have seen 50 year old Tupperware being used and still in good condition today. Another favorite is the Servalier series with the star lids. They seemingly discontinued it, I suspect because of BPA contents.
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Tupperware does have an unbelievably long life for a plastic product. We (designers) should use it more often as an example of a plastic product, sold at a premium, that is durable.

I don't think many of their products would have a BPA concern. I don't think they ever used PC, which is the main resin that used BPA as a release agent.
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