Re: New Design leaders....

January 10th, 2011, 8:32 am

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Im going to throw Cadillac into the mix. I know that they have not changed recently, but I think the start of the 'Art and Science' design language was really a game changer. They went from a pretty typical American car company (Im sure you all forgot about the 82 Cimmaron) to a spectacular spread of vehicles that are taking awards left and right based on the new design language. It was nice to see a company bucking the trend of updating vehicles from the 60's.

Re: New Design leaders....

January 10th, 2011, 9:45 am

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shoenista
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What about fashion brands?

Pringle.
Burberry
Mulberry

All were stuffy British brands rarely seen on the backs of anyone under the age of 60, now revitalised and very cool.

Re: New Design leaders....

January 10th, 2011, 11:38 am

simon_four_fingers
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shoenista wrote:What about fashion brands?

Pringle.
Burberry
Mulberry

All were stuffy British brands rarely seen on the backs of anyone under the age of 60, now revitalised and very cool.

That has to deal more with style and trends for young adults. Young men use to rebel by rocking a leather jacket rather then a blazer. But now young men are more incline to dress in a clean modern cut suite. It all comes in cycles.
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Re: New Design leaders....

January 10th, 2011, 12:53 pm

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simon_four_fingers wrote:
shoenista wrote:What about fashion brands?

Pringle.
Burberry
Mulberry

All were stuffy British brands rarely seen on the backs of anyone under the age of 60, now revitalised and very cool.

That has to deal more with style and trends for young adults. Young men use to rebel by rocking a leather jacket rather then a blazer. But now young men are more incline to dress in a clean modern cut suite. It all comes in cycles.
Not really, the frumpy 'old man' stuff they still do, but the product that makes the headlines and has made these brands hip again is very different indeed - I'm thinking Burberry Prorsum, the catwalk line, designed by Christopher Bailey. One of the key items in fashion this winter was the Burberry Aviator jacket, million miles away from the trench that they were originally known for and got so much coverage in the fashion press.

You could even add Jimmy Choo - he was a small time London shoe maker, well known in the eighties but not particularly hip, sold his name to Tamara Mellon, who has turned it into multi million pound business.

New Design leaders

January 10th, 2011, 3:26 pm

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Lots of good brands mentioned. As far as individual designers go I can not think of many who have had a more profound impact in the last few years than Michael DiTullo. I've seen his book turn up at every design school I have been to in the past few years and the work he did at Nike seems to have inspired many.

Re: New Design leaders....

January 10th, 2011, 4:22 pm

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I am surprised that P&G has not been mentioned. They have single handedly changed the way CPG companies think about design. Others in packaging are:

Coke- has done some the best promotional work I have seen in years
Kleenex- Changed the way we view the common tissue box
Method- made the common detergent bottle look nice

Other Products:

Audi- I am not really a car guy but they have put out some nice looking stuff the past 10 years
Apple- no need to explain
LaCie- I have quite a few HD by them. Great stuff!!
Bose- they still amaze me with their quality
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Re: New Design leaders....

January 10th, 2011, 8:02 pm

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PackageID wrote:I am surprised that P&G has not been mentioned. They have single handedly changed the way CPG companies think about design. Others in packaging are:

Coke- has done some the best promotional work I have seen in years
Kleenex- Changed the way we view the common tissue box
Method- made the common detergent bottle look nice

Other Products:

Audi- I am not really a car guy but they have put out some nice looking stuff the past 10 years
Apple- no need to explain
LaCie- I have quite a few HD by them. Great stuff!!
Bose- they still amaze me with their quality
Those companies do have good design, but I don't think count to the OP as companies that didn't embrace design and have now leaned that way to change.

Likewise, I wouldn't really say P&G fits either. I don't see them really changing much of anything and I'm sure wouldn't know their product from a Lever Bros, Clorox, etc.

I'd agree with Shoenista though,
What about fashion brands?

Pringle.
Burberry
Mulberry

All were stuffy British brands rarely seen on the backs of anyone under the age of 60, now revitalised and very cool.
If you aren't in the industry or follow fashion, it's easy to think that Burberry was always cool. It wasn't - it was for you grandad. LV made a similar change though not as drastic I believe when they became part of the LVMH group and had a new CD (Marc Jacobs) come in, though to extent they always had a luxury halo around the brand.

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Re: New Design leaders....

January 10th, 2011, 8:18 pm

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What about fashion brands?

Pringle.
Burberry
Mulberry

All were stuffy British brands rarely seen on the backs of anyone under the age of 60, now revitalised and very cool
Hasn't Burberry suffered from the 'chav' association?

Re: New Design leaders....

January 10th, 2011, 8:22 pm

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sanjy009 wrote:
What about fashion brands?

Pringle.
Burberry
Mulberry

All were stuffy British brands rarely seen on the backs of anyone under the age of 60, now revitalised and very cool
Hasn't Burberry suffered from the 'chav' association?
yes now in some markets. But I think the point was more how they've changed from a staid background embracing design, and surely if you look at the real Burberry (prossum, et all.) not just the check scarves vs. where they were 20 years ago it'd be apparent.

A future design leader, maybe not to be fair to the original topic, but close ;)

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Re: New Design leaders....

January 10th, 2011, 9:48 pm

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rkuchinsky wrote:
Likewise, I wouldn't really say P&G fits either. I don't see them really changing much of anything and I'm sure wouldn't know their product from a Lever Bros, Clorox, etc.
I am sorry R, but I would have to disagree here. I think the point above has to do with the fact that they own so many brands, as well a CPG is not as glamorous as some of the other companies in these posts. P&G has only started to embrace design in the past 10 years. They have brought consumer centered design to the forefront of CPG design development and is the model for CPG design organizations. They have taken a product (meaning packaging) and really started to study how the consumer uses it, buys it, interacts with it, as well as study what it means to them emotionally. They then design around that. This is much different then 10 years ago when "good packaging design" was slapping a cool label on a bottle or a box.

I would say that Kleenex has done the same. They took a product that everyone hid and designed it to be left out in the open and compliment your house. They realized that the more visible their product was the more it would get used. They did not embrace design until just recently.

Both companies in my eyes are the same as Hyundai. Both companies creating decent products, but not getting noticed or not impacting the consumer more than its function. Both realized that through design they could move more product and increase sales. Both created design organizations and have been booming sense.
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Re: New Design leaders....

January 10th, 2011, 9:49 pm

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I thought this series by Penguin Classics, in which graphic novel artists were commissioned to create new covers for a number of classics, was a great use of design to bring classic literature to contemporary audiences. I have since seen similar efforts by other publishers.

Re: New Design leaders....

January 10th, 2011, 9:55 pm

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PackageID wrote:
rkuchinsky wrote:
Likewise, I wouldn't really say P&G fits either. I don't see them really changing much of anything and I'm sure wouldn't know their product from a Lever Bros, Clorox, etc.
I am sorry R, but I would have to disagree here. I think the point above has to do with the fact that they own so many brands, as well a CPG is not as glamorous as some of the other companies in these posts. P&G has only started to embrace design in the past 10 years. They have brought consumer centered design to the forefront of CPG design development and is the model for CPG design organizations. They have taken a product (meaning packaging) and really started to study how the consumer uses it, buys it, interacts with it, as well as study what it means to them emotionally. They then design around that. This is much different then 10 years ago when "good packaging design" was slapping a cool label on a bottle or a box.

I would say that Kleenex has done the same. They took a product that everyone hid and designed it to be left out in the open and compliment your house. They realized that the more visible their product was the more it would get used. They did not embrace design until just recently.

Both companies in my eyes are the same as Hyundai. Both companies creating decent products, but not getting noticed or not impacting the consumer more than its function. Both realized that through design they could move more product and increase sales. Both created design organizations and have been booming sense.
I'm open to be convinced, but so am not.

They then design around that. This is much different then 10 years ago when "good packaging design" was slapping a cool label on a bottle or a box.
Got any more examples? I have yet to really see of be aware of any P&G packaging or CPG that stands out. If it were to new companies, I'd nominate Method, which I think has really changed the market. But P&G? I can't see it.

Kleenex does some special boxes, but AFAIK, they've done that for some time. I'd agree that they have made many strides in products like Swiffer (That's P&G I think), but can't really see them as a Design Leader in total. Maybe some growth in the market, perhaps, but as a new Braun, new direction as a LG, Samsung, Kia, I dunno...

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Re: New Design leaders....

January 11th, 2011, 2:10 am

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Mr-914 wrote:Ford and HP. HP is really under-rated. They do solid design in everything and have for the last 6-8 years. Dell does great concepts that I never see in the real world. Where do they go?
I'd say they were stronger in the 90's, up until you know who.

Most printers from that era are still kickin it today.

Can you say the same about much of the more recent products, that they'll still be working away in 15?

Re: New Design leaders....

January 11th, 2011, 7:01 am

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sanjy009 wrote:
What about fashion brands?

Pringle.
Burberry
Mulberry

All were stuffy British brands rarely seen on the backs of anyone under the age of 60, now revitalised and very cool
Hasn't Burberry suffered from the 'chav' association?
Only in the UK, I'd say - it's the check, Prorsum doesn't use the check and you can't give anything with the check on it away in the UK becuase of the chav association although the prorsum clothing sells out - I grew up with Burberry, the factory which makes the trenches is about a mile from where I grew up. We all wore Burberry as kids, because everyone knew someone who worked there.

Mulberry was a stuffy leather goods country in the West Country, but now has cool bags often named after celebs. One of my friends did some freelance for them (she had previously worked at Bottega Veneta, another stuffy leather goods company that was relaunched). They named a bag after her - Emmy.

Re: New Design leaders....

January 11th, 2011, 11:40 am

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Switching blades on a hacksaw in the workshop made me realize how superb that thing was, in ergonomics, details, and technical solutions compared to anything else in the shop.

Of course it was from fiskars.
I have no insight in to their stuff except what ive seen the last few years, so I'm not sure if they have re-invented them selves. but id def call them leaders through design. (atleast in the scandinavian region)

I love this thing. Image
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