InvertedVantage
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Ah, I see what you're saying. While it's true that an industrial designer is not responsible for the UX in many cases, they (we) have skills that are applicable to their design.

For instance, one example I always like to use is shortcut keys. A programmer or digital-only UX designer may choose to do the logical thing and assign shortcut keys on a first-letter basis. M is for Move.

An industrial designer would think about the human factors, and from that logic, they might choose to place the keys centered around a single key, so W is Move but then every other key is centered around W. The program is made more efficient to use through shortening the travel time for a person's hand.

There are other factors, such as how easy you want to make the program to pick up without a tutorial video, but this is certainly a UX problem where the solution can be found to have roots in ID.

That being said, I agree that people shouldn't go to an ID school expecting how to build a GUI. But they could expect to go to ID and learn the skills that are necessary to design a UX experience - even if it's not directly taught.

At this point what I'm trying to do is list general skills that are considered "special" to one branch of design (video game, industrial, etc), and talking about how they can be applied elsewhere. I suppose I'm trying to break these multiple specialized branches down into a few common elements.

Am I making sense?
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Playdo
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A Designer's aim, in any field, is to create the best solution to the brief. The human factors, efficiency, and ease of use, as in your examples, are problems that a good UX Designer would solve. I'm not sure why you view them solely as ID skills.

And UI/UX Designers would have developed many skills that an IDer typically wouldn't. Coding, information architecture, wireframing, graphic design, platform requirements, etc.

Sure, you can use the skills learnt in ID as a basis for UI/UX design, and then learn the extra skills neccessary to be a UI/UX Designer, and then put together a UI/UX portfolio and apply for those positions. But it doesn't make your original statement correct.
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Kevin De Smet
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Interesting to know maybe that Alias is only 4200$ for the standard Alias Design, which in my opinion doesn't offer much more than Rhino at a still 4x price point. If you want to use Alias for its main market (automotive surfacing) then you're running closer to the 20000$ mark. It's a high end, niche product and it is priced to match!
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Cyberdemon
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Kevin De Smet wrote:Interesting to know maybe that Alias is only 4200$ for the standard Alias Design, which in my opinion doesn't offer much more than Rhino at a still 4x price point. If you want to use Alias for its main market (automotive surfacing) then you're running closer to the 20000$ mark. It's a high end, niche product and it is priced to match!
They actually restructured the functionality 4-5 years back and moved the key surfacing functionality into Alias Surface (which used to lack commonly used and important surfacing tools). You lose the sketching functionality but not much else in Surface. It's more expensive (~$8-10k?) but cheaper than the $60k we used to pay for a seat of Auto Studio.
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