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bngi
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Atleast you got some closure and can move on without having any doubts if it was right or not!
It's a shame that your dreamjob turned out so rotten, but you seem to have gained a bucket full of experience in how to handle these kinds of situations.
Björn Bengtsson
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yo
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Waxy wrote:Thanks Coyote, and yes there's a bit of an update:

Three weeks after approaching my boss about a meeting, I finally get A to put me on my Boss's calendar. He puts me in for a whopping ten minutes... I end up speaking with him for half an hour.

I started off by showing my boss a continuation of some work another designer had asked me to help him on. Then I showed him a ton of projects that I've been working on with one of the senior designers, on my own time at home. He L O V E D the work, and thanked me for being proactive. My pleasure, I told him, this is what I want to do. He then told me, great! let's put it up for the designers to be inspired. This is the way I want them to start thinking, blah blah.

I'm not sure if I've been more insulted, EVER. So I can do all your crap work when you know AND HAVE ACKNOWLEDGED that my skills range far beyond that, then do creative stuff on the side without getting paid, and I don't even get to develop it?

Then when we started talking about my role and responsibilities his tone of voice completely changed and pretty much said everything I needed to know... He said that while he can clearly see what I bring to the table, there's pretty much not going to be a position for me opening up, and that if I was to start looking elsewhere he wouldn't be insulted (like I thought you gave a sh*t?!) and that he would be happy to write me a recommendation.

I've pretty much moved on mentally, while keeping your points in mind, Coyote. I'm putting on more of a smile when I'm given the bullsh*t, but it really helps now that I'm *absolutely* clear on what a joke the management at this place is. I have made some really good contacts and am on the job hunt (once again, sigh).

I may have to be here longer than is probably healthy but it really really helps knowing there are people in the situation who are on my side and trying to help me out.
wow, that is unfortunate, but you have clarity and that is worth something. Now, stop giving them free work, and spend that time and energy building your portfolio, your personal brand, and your job hunt!
Waxy
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I have good reason to think they may be keeping me on for only one more month... I really really want to have the satisfaction of quitting. I'm thinking of doing it in three weeks. Thoughts?
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Travisimo
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if you think you could use unemployment while you're transitioning to your next job, don't quit... it's like suicide for benefits. Getting it can be like a grant for working on your portfolio
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PackageID
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Travisimo wrote:if you think you could use unemployment while you're transitioning to your next job, don't quit... it's like suicide for benefits. Getting it can be like a grant for working on your portfolio
I agree. If you do not have something else set up, quitting also puts a bad taste in employers mouth and you want to keep your reputation intact. What makes you think they are getting rid of you in 4 weeks? Is it because you talked to you boss? I would ask these questions when they let you know you assignment is ending. I would also advise you to start gathering work for your portfolio. Nothing is worse than leaving somewhere and not having anything to show for the time you spent. Trust me I know from experience.


Good luck and keep us posted!!
-Justin Coble-

"Never let the same dog bite you twice" -Chuck Berry-
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Lmo
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I really really want to have the satisfaction of quitting. I'm thinking of doing it in three weeks. Thoughts?
It's been said here before that "Industrial Design" is a small community. There is an old adage that covers this kind of situation, it is, "Don't sh*t in your own nest."

Assuming, for the moment, that you really, really, enjoyed quitting ... how do you explain why it is you left your previous employer; it's a typical question when being considered for a position. "So, Ms. W., should we expect you to just up a quit at some point?" You would have a history of it (at that point).

And quitting not only puts a bad taste in an employer's mouth it also denies you the eligibility to draw unemployment benefits.

Calm down. Life's a bit*h, but there are worse things; like having no job and not being able to make rent. Take everyone elses advice and set yourself up for the next phase of your career ... without destroying what you've accomplished thus far.

Above all, Keep it Professional.

edit - I would add that the fourth quarter of the year is a notoriously bad time of year to be looking for a job.
Lew Morris
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Waxy
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Thank you all for the reality check.

It's just too easy to get too emotional/frustrated when every day is filled with sugary sweet exclamations of "I have a *project* for you!!" as if I'm five years old at summer camp.
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Lmo
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Just an observation...

Most designers "live" design 24/7. It's an inseparable part of the job, especially at the front of a career.

But, in my opinion, it isn't necessarily a good thing; work to live, not the other way around. "Get a life" is such an overused cliché, but it's so apropos.
Lew Morris
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