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Re: IF MONEY DIDN'T MATTER...

Posted: February 14th, 2013, 5:18 pm
by orrkwankit
1) vehicle design for ILM-Lucasfilm, Pixar-Disney, etc. (see Daniel Simon, Syd Mead and Scott Robertson)
2) design aftermarket exterior add-ons for Import Tuners (hoods, fenders, air dams, spoilers, etc)
3) own a floating fishing lodge on the Alaskan pan-handle and take guests out on Salmon fishing trips

Re: IF MONEY DIDN'T MATTER...

Posted: December 6th, 2013, 3:13 pm
by Svenas
I would really like to make a home out of trash some day. I think it's just great that you can make something worth A LOT out of something that's worth NOTHING.

Re: IF MONEY DIDN'T MATTER...

Posted: January 17th, 2014, 10:56 am
by noahwangerin

Re: IF MONEY DIDN'T MATTER...

Posted: January 17th, 2014, 1:23 pm
by thecuster86
noahwangerin wrote:Be a bicycle / frame builder.
Oh man! You went to the Fatic bike building class? How did you like it?

To answer the question, if money was no object I would just make things, lots of things. Anything from modern furniture (instead of movie theater furniture and arena seating like I do now) to bikes (I've been thinking of the Fatic school or the Yamaguchi school), to footwear/softgoods.

Re: IF MONEY DIDN'T MATTER...

Posted: January 17th, 2014, 5:21 pm
by noahwangerin
thecuster86 wrote:
Oh man! You went to the Fatic bike building class? How did you like it?
I loved it, I highly recommend Doug's class. He's very thorough and a perfectionist - so, a good guy to learn from. Building a frame was a lot harder than I anticipated, and the class was stressful at times, but well worth it. Message me if you'd like, I'd be happy to elaborate or answer questions.

Re: IF MONEY DIDN'T MATTER...

Posted: January 19th, 2014, 12:40 pm
by Lmo
Noah, what kind of flux is this?

Image

Re: IF MONEY DIDN'T MATTER...

Posted: January 19th, 2014, 2:45 pm
by NURB

Re: IF MONEY DIDN'T MATTER...

Posted: January 19th, 2014, 2:47 pm
by NURB
Watching a master frame builder at work is an amazing thing to see. Here in Minneapolis we're blessed to have several legendary builders doing everything from purpose built utility rigs to race bikes to touring and even some custom carbon fiber. If you ever see a custom builder, ask or a shop tour. It's quite an education.

Re: IF MONEY DIDN'T MATTER...

Posted: January 19th, 2014, 6:26 pm
by noahwangerin
Lmo wrote:Noah, what kind of flux is this?
While it's pretty much identical to Gasflux, the brand is actually Cycle Design

It's a little bit nicer - it dries quickly at the start of the braze (which leads to less flow and loss of flux).
NURB wrote:Watching a master frame builder at work is an amazing thing to see.
I totally agree! Watching Doug Fattic braze is almost like magic. Here in Chicago I'm lucky to share a bike building studio with Levi Borrenson and Michael Catano

I'd love to go visit other masters in other states. I'll have to swing by Minneapolis!

Re: IF MONEY DIDN'T MATTER...

Posted: January 19th, 2014, 8:47 pm
by NURB
Huh. Thought everyone used Gasflux...

A few Minneapolis builders to checkout:
http://peacockgroove.com/ (just nuts... but an amazing builder)
http://www.chriskvalecycles.com/CKC/Home.html (a legend among builders)
http://www.curtgoodrich.com/
http://applemanbicycles.com/ (custom carbon)
http://www.capricornbicycles.com/ (formerly of Minneapolis, now of North Carolina)

There's many more, and a culture and industry to back it all. It's amazing here...

Back on topic:
I'd be a frame builder, for sure.
Or own a coffee shop. I don't know why that's always been a dream of mine. It just seems like fun to me.

Re: IF MONEY DIDN'T MATTER...

Posted: January 20th, 2014, 6:46 pm
by sanjy009
In light of this topic, this article is of interest:

In the Name of Love: Elites embrace the “do what you love” mantra. But it devalues work and hurts workers.

"“Do what you love” disguises the fact that being able to choose a career primarily for personal reward is a privilege, a sign of socioeconomic class. "

Re: IF MONEY DIDN'T MATTER...

Posted: January 20th, 2014, 7:22 pm
by NURB
Along those lines: this book is against the whole "find your passion" route of employment. An interesting read, for sure.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/1455509124

Re: IF MONEY DIDN'T MATTER...

Posted: January 21st, 2014, 9:33 am
by iab
sanjy009 wrote:In light of this topic, this article is of interest:

In the Name of Love: Elites embrace the “do what you love” mantra. But it devalues work and hurts workers.

"“Do what you love” disguises the fact that being able to choose a career primarily for personal reward is a privilege, a sign of socioeconomic class. "
Pretty ironic coming from a writer.

And her conclusions could be considered a bit of an overreach.

Re: IF MONEY DIDN'T MATTER...

Posted: January 21st, 2014, 1:59 pm
by noahwangerin
The author's examples of Doing What You Love are all corporate / industry related. There is no mention of the small baker, flower shop, or the down-on-your-luck driven entrepreneur who starts their own business. These are people that create jobs for others. They create opportunities for others to follow their dreams too.

Re: IF MONEY DIDN'T MATTER...

Posted: January 21st, 2014, 7:57 pm
by sanjy009
noahwangerin wrote:The author's examples of Doing What You Love are all corporate / industry related. There is no mention of the small baker, flower shop, or the down-on-your-luck driven entrepreneur who starts their own business. These are people that create jobs for others. They create opportunities for others to follow their dreams too.
My take on the article isn't 'don't follow your passion', it is 'in following your passion, don't be taken advantage of'.

In a desirable field, with limited opportunities, people with financial resources can take the unpaid internships etc. so get an advantage that isn't merit/ talent based.
The "Do What you Love" issue is then people with the resources put it all down to 'following your passion' rather than, for example, realising mum & dad financially supported them, and the article is stating this advice is hurting those without the resources.

One example. When I was a poor scumbag student in a recession in the early 1990's, an 18 year old started a cosmetics company in Melbourne and made millions, won accolades and acclaim. Held up as an example of hard work and entrepreneurship etc. The founder started the company because her boyfriend, heir to a fashion fortune, lent her $40,000.
Now, great business story, obvious talent that led to success, but how much luck and privilege were involved? Not everyone has access to a boyfriend who can afford to pony up $40k. Claiming that it was just hard work and passion doesn't take into account the advantages this person had. You don't want a system based on privilege, you want it based on merit and ability. That's the danger the article is warning about with 'follow your passion'.