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bkhw
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I had an assignment at my university which involved experimental form-giving, without constraints from manufacturing processes. The problem now is that a company approached me to make this in a very low-volume edition (10 or so and maybe later more). It can be a premium priced product, so it can have a high price point.

Any tips on manufacturing processes to make this form in a food safe metal (it is a lemon squeezer)? Is some sort of investment casting possible (and at what price)? Or any other material that is food safe? We tried 3d printing in ceramic, but the head part will fall apart. I am open to changing the design if needed (closing the holes, wall thickness etc). Thanks!

Edit: Boundary box is around:
5 w x 5 d x 3 h [inch]
12 w x 12 d x 10 h [cm]
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engio
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For 10pcs 3D-printing sound like a good fit. DMLS? (3D-printing in metal). Add another mm to the wall thickness for the top part, it doesn't look like the design would be compromised.
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Scott Bennett
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The bronze/stainless material normally used in DMLS is not rated as food safe. Investment casting (probably aluminum) with 3D printed patterns would work, depending on your budget.
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yssagul
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I think your best option is to 3D print the master pattern and investment cast as Scott said. I'm not sure about the costs of the casting.

Found this page from Stratasys about FDM investment casting: http://www.stratasys.com/applications/m ... nt-casting
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ralphzoontjens
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You can now directly print wax models at Shapeways (in case you weren't aware)
http://www.id-z.one
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JEriksson
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Just me that thinks that the problem here is a concept without manufacturing constraints and you now try to manufacture it?
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yssagul
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It was originally a university project. He said he was approached by a company to manufacture it.
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ralphzoontjens
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JEriksson wrote:Just me that thinks that the problem here is a concept without manufacturing constraints and you now try to manufacture it?
Well the exercise is in line with additive manufacturing which has far less constraints.

Investment (lost wax) casting from a 3D printed burnout core in, say, a 316 SS seems the only way to create a foodsafe object here.
I am looking also into powder injection molding, does anyone have experience and know if it is foodsafe after extraction?
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