Wood stain and colour

I am taking a wooden product and:

  1. staining it black
  2. painting it black
  3. giving it a layer of lacquer
  • after only a few months of using the product their are chipped areas showing the original wood colour.

Are there any special techniques or ways to get a deeper stain into the wood?

What products are you applying, what wood is it, and how does it get used?

  1. staining it black
  2. painting it black
  3. giving it a layer of lacquer

I’d say, pick one… … why so many different coatings? Is this a decorative-finish situation?

If the coating is “chipping” all the way down to the base material then the first coat is not getting a sufficient bite on it to hold; stains penetrate wood fibers and don’t provide any “mechanical” grip, and may in fact, be preventing adhesion.

What kind of stain? water base? oil base? (say “no”)

The subsequent application of “paint” (you don’t mention what kind of paint) is not being provided a “primed” surface and probably is not getting a good adhesion to the substrat, or may even be attacking the first coat.

What kind of paint? oil base? urethane? water based latex (say “no”)

Lacquer thinners are notoriously aggressive and my be migrating down through the first two layers… lacquers easily penetrate latex and oil based paints.

Hard to say with so many solvents involved.

And then there’s the question of

what wood is it, and how does it get used?

Many woods are virtually “un-paintable”. Some preservatives used in plywoods inhibit paint cure. Oily woods are hard to paint; in particular… teak, eucalyptus, cedar, rosewood, tropical hardwoods, etc.

So this begs the question… if you’re painting in black … why use wood at all?

Hi, I just stumbled across your post.

You could soak steel wool in vinegar (cheap white) for some time and then apply that to wood. I hear it turns it black. I’ve personally have had experience soaking iron nails in vinegar and it turned my maple 60% gray. Although the color isn’t consistent or even. Some times it would turn the wood warm, sometimes purplish, sometimes spot on. I ended up soaking it for about 3 weeks. But I liked the color best after 1.5 weeks.