WINE RACK

lol. I think it’s a french proverb which goes like…
‘Full glass, I empty you. Empty glass, I pity you’.

retarded guest, don’t visit this thread if ya hate it.
dont hate the game, love the playas!

To Guest who can’t “store” wine:
I had the same problem a couple years ago - I’m guessing you live alone -I might be wrong - but that’s what caused me to be depressed and drink too much - not having anyone to talk to about your day sounds pretty miniscule,
but after time it can really add up and make you develop bad drinking habits - I suggest get a roommate or find someone to hang out with on a semi daily basis - if you don’t I can tell you it gets worse - lost a job because of it - I then had to move home.

It worked out when I was home because I saw that I had a problem, and being around people helped me to not be depressed (the number one cause of depression is not having anyone to talk to). After I got a new job and moved out I made sure I had a friend in the same building - if you live in a new town and don’t know anyone a roommate is a good way to go.

After I got it all worked out I found I’m not an alchy, I drink socially - but never alone, and I still refrain from storing alcohol in the house. And now I’m at the top of my design career - rhymin and stealin’

sorry to all for the after school special message - I find it’s always interesting to read about other people’s train wrecks, so to everyone - enjoy!

Thanks, been there. I appreciate your response. While I get an occaisional chuckle at my current inability to store wine in anything but my belly, I also worry about it during my more, shall we say, sober moments. I didnt take a single drink during high school or college or in the first three years out of school…and though I have enough people living with and around me, it’s my professional life that first led me to drink and keeps me drinking. It’s hard finding fulfillment in the workplace, and unfortunately I’m the sort of person who needs engaging work and engaging people to speak with throughout the day. Okay…go out and make it happen, I know, I know.

How did you climb your way into work you love?

Thanks, been there. I appreciate your response. While I get an occaisional chuckle at my current inability to store wine in anything but my belly, I also worry about it during my more, shall we say, sober moments. I didnt take a single drink during high school or college or in the first three years out of school…and though I have enough people living with and around me, it’s my professional life that first led me to drink and keeps me drinking. It’s hard finding fulfillment in the workplace, and unfortunately I’m the sort of person who needs engaging work and engaging people to speak with throughout the day. Okay…go out and make it happen, I know, I know.

How did you climb your way into work you love?

never fell out of it.

Deez forget to log in again?

Don’t confuse the dumb foke.

Deez, I’m really curious…

Without specifics, did you have a degree in ID? Which country? How long ago did you graduate and if so, are you employed as a designer currently?

Not trying to stir things up, I’m just wondering since we haven’t seen your portfolio. I’d respect your off-hand, politically incorrect, brash comments more if I knew you were an ID professional.

I would probably say this first - if you think you need to go to AA, do it - my best friend didn’t drink much in college either and got into drinking afterwards - he swears by aa, and said he can’t have a drop which I believe - it depends on the person.

On engaging work - I looked back a lot at what I did when i was a kid - lots of making stuff out of cardboard - toys etc. - I’m gifted mechanically - but I often think of other areas in the creative field to get better money. there’s a book at barnes and noble titled “discover what your best at” it is a series of tests you take and then grade yourself - the areas you score best in are enlightening as to what type of work you’d most enjoy - it is true that the things you excel at naturally are the things you enjoy most. the book also has a glossary at the back detailing different careers - not like I’d find a career out of a book, but it does tell you your strengths - which is good info when thinking about career moves.

By the way - the way the book breaks strengths down is - social, mechanical, clerical, mathematical, etc.

I scored off the charts on mechanical - which is nice

Just as I thought. You’re a wannabe Karim.

You’re being overly vague about things, which leads me to think (and rightfully so) that you’re full of it. You don’t have an ID degree. you don’t have a design job.

Stop wasting our time on this forum posting drivel. There are a lot of good threads on here and you seem to always screw them up or steer them in a negetive direction.

Been there, that sounds like me. I was always, always tinkering as a child. I know what I’m good at and what I love doing, I just find it very hard to make a living at it. Yes I work in the design world, but boy is it a dumbed down place, even though my firm is at the “top of its game” working for some of the richest individuals (not corporations) in the world. Quite disgusting, vulgar and dispiriting stuff that pays the bills and then some…but that’s completely it.

I could use a stiff drink.

Guest it sounds like the job is the problem - I’m at a firm and it is also a lot of leg work, not lots of design, I was at a corporation for a couple of years and loved it because you had time to think about the designs, and you had a lot more power when if finally went to production - not the case with consultancies. when you have to do something in a certain number of hours you usually don’t have the time to do the sweetest design you can come up with.

Deez where did you go to school? I know you don’t have a job, it’s okay neither do I, blushing admits he has an BullShit in ID and works as a Barista at Starbucks.

Okay, DEEZ, I’ll go first, how 'bout that?

Studied ID in the US, near Chicago. Grad. in 2000 and have been employed ever since as a designer. First did exhibition design, then product and now I’m in the watersports industry. IDSA member.

28 y old, so I’d say I’m not a kid.

Now, how 'bout you enlighten us with your credentials? Or is the manager at McD’s breathing down your neck?

I’m in the watersports industry.

Which water sport? sounds like fun :sunglasses:

You ma’am, are a joke.

So you dispute the fact that you’re not a kid and that you’re all big now. But you don’t dispute the fact that you are and do sound like a crying bitch in every post in every thread since you registered. Also, obviously you are clueless about life and how things are. Go first? listing useless crap no one cares about? and you want me to match your uninteresting stupidity? I’m not even going to take 5 min to type a response to that. You just don’t understand things. I’m sure you misinterpret a lot of things in life and sit there puzzled at people’s normal responses.

Kid, I can read you like a limp moist paperback a mile away. Keep wasting your time with loaded probes and dead end fishing. Dealing with your intelligence, and its use as base in all of your inquiries is painful to consider seriously. Tug at my pant leg again and whine about not trying to stir things up, because once I bat you back and forth for just one post worth, you shine like a polished shitpile for everyone to see. At least I’m consistent. You are boring.

You’re the bland, run-of-the-mill, push over, oblivious, typical chump that runs around clueless for most of life. Ever wonder why some people SEEM to get breaks that you don’t? Here’s a hint, it’s you. I can only imagine listening to your personal acquaintances and family members describe you. I’m sure it’ll be chock full of nothing to talk about and uncomfortable silences.

Do us and the profession all a favor and stay in the corn belt where time stands still and so do smoke screen design careers.

In the meantime, have a lovely Tuesday night, and try to go grow a personality.

(don’t forget to watch Made in America!)

Wow, guess that really puts me in my place. And I thought I had a good career going. Maybe I should just go shoot myself. What’s with you and your psycho-babble bullshit anyhow? You’re a plague over these boards. And me bitching? I’d love to see that. If anything, I think I’ve tried to be as helpful as could be on these boards, and have received some good suggestions in return. You, my friend, don’t promote anything that ignorance and are obviously starving for attention. Mommy and daddy didn’t give you enough attention as a child? Want the latest and greatest salad shooter in hopes that people will say “gee, that Deez, he sure does have a cool apartment?”

Corn belt? Come on, get your geography together. We’re in the mountains of South Carolina. It’s called Southeast. Notice it says that next to my screen name. Yes, there are a lot of rednecks here, but they can sure make a tasty BBQ sandwich.

I’m not threatening anyone here. Actually, the only one that’s threatening people is you. Telling someone to go kill themself is not exactly conducive to a positive self-image. I know there is no forum etiquette handbook, but threating and belittling people behind a very disturbing screen image is just plain wrong.

But, alas, I’m done. Doesn’t matter what I say at this point, I’m ignoring your posts (which is difficult to do when you cover the entire forum like a plague.)

Since most of the posters on this forum are TRUE ID’ers, how 'bout we just have a discussion on proper design development. Where do you start? Do you dive headfirst into CAD, doodle up something, do Photoshop renderings of various ideas, hack away at foam, etc?

I generally do it like this:

  1. Once the parameters have been set by marketing and research is done (along with costing issues), I start with simple thumbnails. These may be developed into some marker renderings, but rarely go past Verithin and Canson paper.
  2. Once approved, i develop 3-6 of these concepts into 2-dimensional Photoshop renderings.
  3. One is chose, and the performance part of the product is keyed in and analyzed. Then ergonomics and taken into account and the whole thing ends up in CAD
  4. CNC the CAD model in foam
  5. With the foam model in hand, we manipulate the surfaces
  6. Make plastic or composite prototype from foam plug
  7. Testing, testing, testing
  8. Revise plug, make new prototype and test
  9. Digitally scan revised plug, redraw in CAD, cut in CNC and send to tooler.

What do you guys do? It varies, I’m sure, on the particular product, but it’s interesting to see how other places work.
Hopefully sketching is still used.

you do realize you’re reacting as hoped.

if some troll turned out to be Loewy risen from the grave would you suddenly find respect for person behind the posts? i wouldnt. i dont think you would either. people worthy of respect exhibit qualities worth respect. whether anonymous or not.

so dont ask.