What would a Disaster Relief Vehicle (DRV) look like?

Has anyone seen a vehicle (in use) that is designed specifically for disaster relief and response? I have seen some cool high tech fire trucks. What would a “DRV” look like and what should it be equipped with?

its called and ambulance

just playin :wink:

maybe not a disaster causing vehicle (or toy)…

Check out these cool concepts…
http://www.laautoshow.com/2006/designla/designla_designchallenge.htm#popMaybach
http://www.laautoshow.com/2006/designla/designla_designchallenge.htm#popSmart
http://www.cardesignnews.com/features/2004/040920strate-show/index.php

Thank you boner for your excellent insight. I will investigate further into this so called “ambulance”. You’re a funny guy, and what a clever name “Boner”. Now, that is a dirty word right? That is so clever. You must be that same clever, funny guy that writes jokes on bathroom stalls. Gosh, that is so clever. Wait, are you actually sitting on the toilet as you post on these forums? Gosh that is just, that is so clever.

maybe not a disaster causing vehicle (or toy)…

Check out these cool concepts…
http://www.laautoshow.com/2006/designla/designla_designchallenge.htm#popMaybach
http://www.laautoshow.com/2006/designla/designla_designchallenge.htm#popSmart
http://www.cardesignnews.com/features/2004/040920strate-show/index.php

Thank you boner for your excellent insight. I will investigate further into this so called “ambulance”. You’re a funny guy, and what a clever name “Boner”. Now, that is a dirty word right? That is so clever. You must be that same clever, funny guy that writes jokes on bathroom stalls. Gosh, that is so clever. Wait, are you actually sitting on the toilet as you post on these forums? Gosh that is just, that is so clever.

i think that a DRV would have to be able to supply the essentials. medical needs, food + water, clothing, shelter. it would have to be an all terrain vehicle. it would probably need to have rescue equiment also. i think maybe you should research the green vehicles that provide assistance to stranded drivers, accidents and road hazards. atlanta Ga and nashville Tn have them.

What would such a vehicle absolutely need? I can think of quite a bit.
I was thinking that a vehicle like this would have so many applications in Disaster Releif that it could be made modular and outfitted as needed to better meet a specific need. It could serve as a cargo truck, an ambulance (or an entire mobile field hospital), a general transport vehicle, a power truck, a light truck, etc…

  • Lightweight enough to be air lifted (even dropped) by a cargo plane.
  • Forgiving in terms of what kinds of fuel it can use and how much it uses.
  • Lots of ground clearance
  • Lots of torque for
  • Winching
  • Towing
  • Overcoming obstacles
  • Lots of lighting
  • Power outlets (even a generator)
  • Onboard air compressor
  • GPS
  • Various communications systems
  • Fording ability
  • All mechanical and electrical components sealed
  • Fully aspirated intake and exhaust
  • High cargo capacity
  • Storage for
  • Medical and Humanitarian supplies
  • Rescue equipment
  • Tools and hardware

Etc etc etc etc etc…now you’ve got me thinking.

RATT

The United States Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC) provides a case in point. In the late 1980s, AFSOC materiel planners identified a requirement for a new vehicle to replace the aging M151 series “Jeeps” then utilized by AFSOC’s Combat Control Teams and pararescue jumpers in performance of their medical treatment and casualty evacuation missions. System requirements included extreme high mobility combined with packaging design that would allow the vehicles to be easily transported as part of a larger C-130 load, and within selected helicopters.

AFSOC representatives eventually connected with a small southern California off-road vehicle manufacturer, North American Raceco (acquired several years later by Flyer Group Inc.). At the time, the company had been building high performance off-road racing vehicles for almost 20 years.

Under the designation of R-1 Rescue All Terrain Transport (RATT), Raceco began to develop a specialized vehicle platform capable of meeting AFSOC’s unique rescue missions. The company received its initial contract to build a single prototype R-1 vehicle at the beginning of 1991 with that system subsequently delivered for government testing in early summer. After some modifications to the specifications, a follow-on contract for 14 production vehicles was awarded in January 1992 with those systems delivered to AFSOC elements over the next two years.

Designed for the special operations casualty evacuation mission, the R-1 was configured to carry up to six litter patients, two medical attendants and a driver. Litters, medical equipment and personal gear are all strapped to a folding framework on top of the vehicle. Racks for up to six litter patients fold out on the sides and rear of the vehicle with a large central crew area providing space for the attendants to treat casualties while on the move. Because the litter configuration restricts vehicle access, the crew enters via a cut-away to the right of the driver’s position, at the front of the vehicle.

The original RATTs were powered by a 110 horsepower, Type IV Porsche 914 air-cooled gasoline engine that reportedly gave the R-1 a weight savings of almost 50 percent over similar water-cooled power packs.

The R-1s were originally fielded with two-piece spun aluminum wheels manufactured from aircraft aluminum to optimize lightweight and high-strength characteristics. The rear wheels were also equipped with run-flat drive devices.

The R-1 features larger tires in the rear. However, the front spare tire, which is stowed under the rear platform, can be utilized in a rear position for emergency situations. Moreover, the R-1 wheel design employed a “HMMWV [High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle] bolt pattern,” permitting the substitution of those common but heavier steel wheels where necessary. Large disc brakes on all four wheels are supported by modified stock car calipers and special compound brake pads to assure responsive stopping capability.

Additional tactical design features of the R-1 system include a dual 24-volt battery system, a removable winch and height-reduction ratchet straps. The electrical system is intended to provide sufficient power to conduct casualty treatment when the vehicle is stopped for extended periods with adjustable floodlights attached to the litter frame at each patient station. The driver is provided with a blackout switch that immediately kills all white light and allows the vehicle to proceed with only infrared headlights.

Another unique tactical design feature of the R-1 involves a height reduction ratchet strap located at each wheel position. Attaching a small ratchet tool to the straps allows the crew to reduce overall vehicle height by 4 inches, satisfying an additional on-board requirement for one type of unidentified but specialized aircraft.

Based on the design of a dune buggy, the RATT is the world’s most advanced combat medical evacuation vehicle.
http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/defense/1281461.html?page=2&c=y

Yo, didn’t you do one of these for the Architecture for Humanity mobile aids clinic? The entries aren’t online, otherwise I would have just linked to it. :sunglasses: