what does it mean to be an alias jock

Hello, I just stumble in the forum and I been breaking my head trying to figure out what does it mean to be an alias jock
. searched google and wikepedia but no luck
thank you

It means you’re an expert at Alias. My guess the term you are looking for would be Alias Jockey.

you can ride the alias stallion better than an other horse…ahm…CAD software.

Who really knows everything about any given software?

And Does knowing everything really matter?

Thats the reason you get the nickname. :laughing:

It doesn’t necessarily mean you KNOW everything - but theres a certain point where if you don’t know something, you at least know where it will be and how to find it.

I was always the CAD jock in school. If anyone in the entire architecture school had a problem they somehow always ended up at my desk, whether or not I knew the answer ot not. Doesn’t make you a better designer, but you can be sure that theres plenty of people that love having “that guy” around when it’s 2am and they don’t know why their fillets wont trim.

[quote=“Cyberdemon”][quote=“YAYO all dayo”]Who really knows everything about any given software?

And Does knowing everything really matter?[/quote]

Thats the reason you get the nickname. :laughing:

It doesn’t necessarily mean you KNOW everything - but theres a certain point where if you don’t know something, you at least know where it will be and how to find it.

I was always the CAD jock in school. If anyone in the entire architecture school had a problem they somehow always ended up at my desk, whether or not I knew the answer ot not. Doesn’t make you a better designer, but you can be sure that theres plenty of people that love having “that guy” around when it’s 2am and they don’t know why their fillets wont trim.[/quote]

I agree but Isn’t that’s why we work with mechanical engineers and people from China? Why is ID’rs worried about fillets at 2am. Sounds more like a time managment issue to me!

if you trust an engineer to make fillets that look good, you deserve whatever you get.

Basically what I’m trying to say is design and especially “good” design really shouldn’t be done at the 11th hour.

Well the point I was making is unless you know everything about a package then either you’ll:

A: Have to deal with someone ELSE interpreting your design intent and translating it into 3D.

or

B: Learn how to do something from someone whos more experience then you.

And I think every designer on earth can attest to it doesn’t matter how good you are at time management - the 11th hour is a reality that every designer has to deal with. If an engineer comes to you at 4pm the day before youre supposed to send a model out to have an SLA prototype built and tells you that one of your boards just grew in size and you need to take that into account - you’re going to be the one there till 3am redoing all your work to make sure it’s done correctly. Doesn’t matter how good you are, in a collaborative environment those are just the realities.

If you’re in the position of sending napkin sketches off to China to have them interpret your design and build all the CAD files, then you don’t have to worry about that. You just have to deal with the reprocussions of getting something back thats nothing like what you intended. In the end your knowledge of the CAD software has a direct impact on the final product and time it takes to deliver that product.

Well I design mostly desktop items and electronic gadgets and so forth and I basically sketch/ideate,design, prototype,create 3D renderings,mechanicals, provide sizes/specs, price it in different quantities, send it over and voila. If my design is complicated with all sorts of curves, I send them a SAT or Iges file of my work. They send me back thier mechanicals, and then I check to see. I would approved for a prototype to analyse, and maybe a few tries might get it. Show client for sign-off and there you go!

If your company has the time and money to pepper-up 3D models with tooling/engineering bundled together, then more power to you. I can’t imagine a board all of a sudden “grew in size” just like that. That leads me to believe someone’s creditials is sort of suspect. Lost work I could understand, but that example looks like carelessness.

Besides, doesn’t highend designs usually takes around six months or more? With that type of time frame where guys sketch for weeks on a computer tablet, you would think there would be some time left on the clock than just 1 hour as it is on 11!

I’ve only been working in the corporate world for 2 months but I’ve seen this happen multiple times already. One example was battery cells - halfway through a project you find out the cells you were using need to be changed, and you’re supposed to have CAD files sent out for rapid prototyping or an appearance model that needs to be in by a set date. It’s not an issue of getting the product onto the shelves, but rather creating problems along the different steps of the way. Especially for things like design reviews, prototypes, engineering samples, etc.

Either way - it’s not so much a matter of working late as it’s a matter of knowing how to use the tools. If you’re stumbling to use a tool it’s going to take you 8 hours to do something someone proficient could do in 1. Even if you have lots of time for a project, spending it fumbling around won’t help.

I hope those foul-ups wasn’t a big deal that you wrote about during your 2 months where you work. If it was a biggie then someone would have to do some explaining if I was the boss.

Also, if it takes anyone 8 hours to do a particular 3D operation needs to be looked at critically. I can see if the company was very small and couldn’t afford a decent 3D guy.

Not having a clue what Cyberdemon is working on, it would be my guess that they are pushing some boundaries in space and size. Handhelds maybe?

No matter how hard you plan at the beginning of a program having a battery change or a PCB increase, even by a millimeter mid-stream happens. Until you have working PCBs that you can do some real world trials on, you can’t fully gauge power consumption. Marketing adds another feature…whatever.

I worked under a guy that thought like you. “Someone would have to do some explaining if I was the boss”. He couldn’t grasp the fact that a development cycle…especially on pushing limits…had to be flexible. Carried a huge amount of inherent risks and it was how the team responded to and fixed those problems that was most important.

“Having to answer” to development issues creates an environment where no one will do anything that can be a deemed a mistake. They will take the safe route and end up with another uninspired product for the land fill.

I thought the idea was to design around an existing PCB board and know the size already if that is the case. If the size of it was still up in the air than it is a risk your taking, but it shouldn’t be a big deal if your talking about moving some ribs and screws over in the inside. Those things still can be communicated via email to an engineer whether in the US or Asia in relative short amount of time.

I know what you are talking about as far as pushing limits in that it takes time, but trying to pull a rabbit out of your hat at the last minute at the expense of the company’s reputation and client satisfaction is a little too much.

I guess I need some more scenarios and specifics inorder for me to respond in a way were you would understand me better.

I’m no Archie Bunker when it comes to design and development. I am all for pushing the envelope and creating innovative products. But I believe it takes time in an environment that is not filled with anxiety, angst and tension.

Yeah - with stuff like this:

You’re not just dealing with 1 product. You’re dealing with hundreds of components, accessories, charging cradles, complex PCB’s, fully sealed components, etc. You end up dealing with half mm tolerances to get something to properly seal, and theres no room for error. If someone shows up halfway through a development cycle and says “We built this RFID antenna - it doesn’t get the performance we need, we need to enlarge it” then it’s just part of the process. Doesn’t matter how good the designers and engineers are, projects just wind up changing and the ability to quickly turn around extremely complex CAD surfacing is imperative in a field like this.

In 6 months I went from being the best CAD jock in the entire design school to being the biggest noob in a pool of people who have 5-10 years of Alias/Pro E experience. Going to be a long road ahead of me.

Hehe…Symbol. Nice.

Ya, you’re not pushing the limits on space constraints, necessarily. But the integration of an RF Device is no trivial matter. I would love to see the Pro/E database for that!

Good stuff, CD. Good luck with that. You’ll learn more in the next year than you did in your full uni edumacation.

Cool.

Do you make this in Alias or ProE? If you had to make changes it would probably be done in ProE correct?
Do you make the mold domestically?

I didn’t make that, but its just an example of the types of products we make (the largest and most complex - there are many smaller PDA style devices that cram 90% of that functionality into a smartphone sized package). Everyone here works in both Alias and Pro E. Alias for initial surfacing, then Pro E for adding more detailed features and handing off to the engineers.

I’m not sure where the tooling is done - from my understanding theres so many different parts being made that the tooling is made in both the US and China based on the turnaround time, production runs, etc.