This 100% solar community endured Hurricane Ian with no loss of power and minimal damage

Interesting read on how this community was designed to minimize damage

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Thanks for sharing Yo.
It’s great to see these new sustainable communities being designed and built for our increasingly unstable climate.

On a related note I recently read this article about a small town in Australia pursing a 100% renewable energy goal. In contrast to the Babcock Ranch, where I assume many of the residents have built there because they are interested in sustainable energy and building, the town of Yackandandah has been around since the 1850s so the technology is being applied to existing infrastructure and being introduced to an established community.
It’s been driven by a local community group and I think the the local engagement and enthusiasm has been key to its success so far.

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That is awesome @fraser_frase

It is great to see people and communities trying things! I was reading that in LA county there are a number of open canals to transport potable water, but they loose a bit more of it every year to evaporation. So the county is is going to be installing solar panels over all of the miles and miles of canal to both slow the evaporation and add more solar to the grid since building out more solar is now cheaper than any other form electricity generation.

Another interesting combination first pursued in Japan, using solar cells to add shade over agricultural crops to generate electricity and boost crop production at the same time:

I currently listening to this fact packed podcast on electrification and decarbonization… it’s pretty dense so I’m breaking it up into multiple listens but really interesting;

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Thanks @_yo I’ll check out that podcast.
There are a lot of amazing applications of technology in the agriculture industry and some surprising outcomes like this example; Graziers running Merino sheep (grown for their ultrafine wool) in solar panel fields found an improvement in the quality and quantity of wool.
As you’ll see in the article there are concerns for runoff from the panels raising the water table and increasing salinity in the area.
Either way it is a rapidly evolving space.

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