Sugar as a fuel source

I was watching a show on the History channel last night about Sugar. In Brazil they refine sugar into ethanol, which they supply at “every” major gas station. The price difference between petrol ($2.30) and the ethanol ($1.00) is amazing per volume unit. They then went on to say most of the cars down there can run on either source of fuel. Further into the program the car was explained…

GM or “Chevrolet” has been manufacturing a FLEXcar for some time now to keep up with the demand of running this sugar-based ethanol.

There is still a by-product or emission from the exhaust less than or equal to standard petrol, but the refinement process is extremely less as harsh as refining petrol. All in all this sugar-based ethanol is better for our environment!

Why does America (our f*#king gov’t) have it’s head so far up the oil industry’s ass that we can’t speed up the process to help clean up the environment. They mentioned there is a mandate that these FLEXcars need to be introduced by 2012. Why not sooner. Brazil has been doing this since the mid 80’s!

What about BMW’s hydrogen car. No emissions what so ever!

I don’t know, maybe I’m just ranting, but our government here in America is so ass backwards. It’s time for a change!

They extract sugar from sugar canes, which is tropical “fruit”. If the US want to get into that, they will have to import sugarcanes from S.America and refine them in the states… better still, have them refined in S.America for labor cost reduction. Does this make sense for the US? I don’t think so from a political point of view.

Furthermore, really, the Arabs don’t control the world’s petrol market. US does.

Another thing that you mentioned is, a conversion in system takes a lot of time and effort. Introducing a new engine for this new fuel and supply points in gas stations will be a huge project. US is pretty conversative as compared to most other parts of the world. It’s like an long time employee in the office, because they have the most to lose as compared to a newbie.

Yeah I’ve been wondering the same question since mid-high school when I studied a little about Brazil’s sugarcane wanders.

Sugar also comes from sugar beets. Sugar beets are grown locally here in the U.S. If its just sugar that is being refined, why not sugar beets? This would cut down on labor costs.

As far as the sugar/ethanol process, like stated, that may be better for countries outside the United States. Hydrogen is the way the U.S. automotive industry is leaning. As outlined in this article http://www.cnn.com/2005/AUTOS/09/07/bc.autos.bmw.hybrids.reut/, GM, DCX, and BMW are teaming up to produce hybrids and hydrogen containment and dispensing strategies. The earliest the U.S. will see the byproduct of these efforts is in the 2007 GM fullsize trucks and SUVs. Things will improve from the learnings of these vehicles. It will be interesting if U.S. consumers take the baton and run with it.

Here in Vancouver, a Mohawk Oil sells a gas that is about 10% ethanol. It gets up to about 95 or 96 octane. Even the Chevron high-test is only 94 octane.

Hydrogen is not all it is hyped to be as most proponents fail to mention how difficult it is to mfg.

I’d be more interested in some kind of rechargeable battery with an internal two-way fuel cell. The other thing I’m waiting for is that new solar paint developed in Calgary.

:)ensen.

For hybrids, why don’t different car companies team up to make a standard system using the same battery, and mount whatever engine they want? That way they can save money for both R&D and for consumers, but also allow the flexibility to throw on any performance spec by putting it on a different chasis with different engines.

all of your comments show way too much forethought to be considered by Detroit.

  1. Ethanol can be produced from many fruits and vegetables. It is put into gas in the US already, mainly in the midwest where corn is used. Typically, the mixture is no more than 15% ethanol.

  2. If the US were to switch to 100% bio-fuels, like ethanol, the world would be unable to produce enough plant material. That is the downside of bio-fuels: you can feed people, you can feed cars, but you can’t feed both.

  3. I predict that you will see GM buy Honda’s or Toyota’s hybrid power system for upcoming vehicles, perhaps a Cobalt or Impala hybrid. I would not be surprised to see Ford follow suit. Daimler Chrysler appears to have enough R&D to simply pinch a Mercedes unit for the next Neon/300 hybrids.

Things will improve from the learnings of these vehicles.

What will the learnings be? Hydrogen tank shards up everyone’s but in a 5 block radius every few weeks :laughing: :laughing:

That’s an uneducated comment, but I’ve heard Hydrogen would have to be stored at some outreagous amount of pressure. Is that’s true? If so, How the heck do you protect that tank against accidents?

Shouldn’t we all have flying cars by now?
:smiley:

SOME OF YOU BOYS NEED TO DO SOME REASEARCH BEFORE WRITING YOUR BLA BLA BLA.

YOU CITY SLICKERS DON’T KNOW MUCH… THE US GOVERNMENT PAYS FARMERS NOT TO… I REPEAT NOT TO GROW PRODUCT IE CORN, GRAIN, SOY, ETC ALL OF WHICH CAN BE PROCESSED INTO 180 PROOF ETHENOL WHICH IS USED IN ALL FORMS OF RACING

SO WHY NOT THE COMMON EVERYDAY AUTO? BECAUSE WE HAVE AN ASS BACKWARDS GOVERNMENT AND A CORRUPT REGIME IN POWER NOW.

HELL IF THEY WOULD ONLY LEGALIZE IT… HEMP THAT IS, WE COULD UTILIZE THE AMAZING POWERS IT HAS TO OFFER TO MAKE FUEL.

http://running_on_alcohol.tripod.com/index.html