Silo/T-splines/Solidworks experiement

I have been experimenting with Silo as i recently purchased a seat (100 USD when I purchased). It is a sub-division surface modeler that is used in the video game industry and in CG illustration. I am trying to learn how to do both hard edge models and organics in Silo. I have had some success translating that poly/subdiv data through Rhino t-splines into Solidworks. My friend Eric Lagman did the t-spline work. Pretty stoked actually. The algorithms really work well to translate the design intent from Silo into Solidworks. Surface continuity is actually really good- mostly curvature continuous between patches as far as I can tell

The Silo model took a few hours max, and part of that was noodling and trying out the tools. It would be pretty involved to do this in Solidworks or Alias. Thought I would share. Does anyone here use subdiv modelling for ID? Any tips?



Damn, that’s one hell of a model. A couple hours?

Is it viable for production? There appears to be a bunch of undercuts and weird looking surfaces. But all in all it is impressive.

Is this machinable data? i.e. is it surface data or is it poly?

Yes- the data is viable for creating tool paths- the t-splines algorithm outputs nurbs data. I added a few more mechanical details in Solidworks. As far as manufacturability- that is a function of my knowledge of the program, and not really thinking about draft etc: This was more of a workflow experiment. I am still learning.

Continuing to learn. More pics on the blog- not as easy to upload multiple jpegs here :slight_smile:

Man, that is hot! I’ve played a little with the sub-divs in Maya, which I use for rendering only right now. I felt the potential for creating sculptural forms, and it seems like my feelings were right.

Keep us posted on your experiments! They look great!

Man, that is hot! I’ve played a little with the sub-divs in Maya, which I use for rendering only right now. I felt the potential for creating sculptural forms, and it seems like my feelings were right.

Keep us posted on your experiments! They look great!