Second Marker Render Ever

I went and bought a blue Prismacolor marker today and decided to try marker rendering again. I must say it’s very difficult. Anyways this is the result:

The rest was done in photoshop. God dang it I hope Art Center doesn’t reject me because I don’t know how to do this :frowning:

And a final one for today:

This time as well I used no PS except for the shadow under car.

Burns,

Did you use pastel for the lighter blue highlights? Or is that blue prisma with blender?

I was taught the Dick Powell technique at AIP.

http://www.amazon.com/Presentation-Techniques-Dick-Powell/dp/0316912433/ref=pd_sim_b_img_4

I think your renderings are great for no prior experience. I would suggest getting the Dick Powell book and start with simpler forms. Once you have the basics down for boxes, cylinders and spheres, then expand up. The next step I would suggest would be orthographic projection of a simple product.

I have no clue what they look for at Art Center for bachelors, but I would hope they don’t expect marker rendering experts to be applying.

if i were to suggest anything it would be smoother gradients with the marker…
this is more easily acheived with a set a (cool)grays… you can keep the paper really wet with marker and fade the value with lighter shades…
that will eliminate the scrithyness you’ve got going on in the dark part of your relections

I have a question about the marker + pastels

Is it better to use pasel AND marker to achieve a better gradient, or can the same result be acquired with just different tones of marker?

second, does anyone use the prismacolor colorless blender for this? does it work well?

Like any good question the answer is it depends…

depends on how big your drawing is, what your strengths and most importantly your preferences are.

on a letter size page you can use a varying range of grascales to produce gradients. the key is to work quickly and use the right kind of paper. try a bunch to see what you like.

a honda designer came in and did some renderings at school earlier this year. his technique is solely cool grays on a blue-pencil sketch and a chartpack black.

others will forget the markers (cause they can be challenging for gradients) and go with pastels on the sketch for surface definition. gradients are easy with some chopped up pastel mixed with powder… and you can erase it\cut it for highlights…

all of these techniques are kinda oldschool though… most designers will use digital tools for the most part in the rendereing stage.

IMO mixing pastels with marker doesn’t look so good, but theres always some people who can break that rule and pull it off…

Thanks guys! The lighter blue part is just color pencil blended with a tissue paper and the white color pencil. I’m looking to buy some cool gray’s soon, hopefully they’ll be easier! And I think it’s kinda early for me to be experimenting with pastels.

actually i think pastels are easier than gray markers. pastels are more forgivible… you can erase them easily… once you screw up with markers, you have to draw the whiole thing over again… (so work on an overlay)

haha well I was talking about pastels and markers.

This is a gray rendering:

It’s supposed to be a Karmen Ghia.

Copy that sucker a few times and save the original line drawing, then have at the copies with the markers. This will help keep your mind free knowing if you mess up you can start over without having to recreate the line drawing. Eventually after doing this technique for a while you’ll understand the markers and have more confidence the first time around. Enjoy!

Yeah I scan each finished drawing first before I render it just in case I want to try it again.

In the meantime here’s a Porsche:

nice renderings man, good job on the crome bezels on your porche concept
EB