rendering with marker -- linework question

hello everyone,

while im waiting for Santa to give me a wacom, i continue working with markers but i still spend more time beeing sure they are empty rather than using them…


to the point, i dont copy my line work on a vellum, its too long and vellum aint that cheap too, so i just wana know if you tidy your linework using a black marker before or after you add the marker in it

usually i did the linework before adding the color, like this



but few days later i relized i did the linework after the marker, so right now im confused,

thanks for helping

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usually I would sketch it loose, go in with marker, and then tighten it down with some blacks, only addeding them where needed to punch it out.

One of the best nuggets of advice I ever got was from a guy named Jim Orr, and it was this:

“Saturate to generate!”

Draw fast, and loose with a light marker to define your volumes and shapes. Then keep going darker and darker until you have the lights and darks properly defined. Then it’s just a simple matter of adding details with pen/pencil always keeping in mind the correct use of line weight.

However, another hero of mine, Doug Chiang, would draw his stuff with pen / pencil first, photocopy it, then add the marker values. I prefer the first method, but it really comes down to whatever you get comfy with.

Here is an example of some of my marker stuff. You can see where I went in with full detail, and where I left off. Hope this helps!

skyarrow, could you do a demo of one of those types of sketches and post it on here? I have tried the marker-first method before, I usually end up overworking the sketch too much and have a hard time defining areas. It just gets all muddled with too much marker. Lately I have been working with blue pencil as a base first, then pen, then adding definition with marker last. I’m not sure this is the best way, though. Anyway, seeing the steps to develop your style of sketching would help a lot.

D Posted: Mon Feb 13, 2006 1:05 pm Post subject:


skyarrow, could you do a demo of one of those types of sketches and post it on here? I have tried the marker-first method before, I usually end up overworking the sketch too much and have a hard time defining areas. It just gets all muddled with too much marker. Lately I have been working with blue pencil as a base first, then pen, then adding definition with marker last. I’m not sure this is the best way, though. Anyway, seeing the steps to develop your style of sketching would help a lot.

D,

I’ll try and get something up in the next few days. But in the meantime check out Doug Chiang’s work at www.dougchiang.com. There is a button on that page with an “R” symbol; click on that and find the section for his studio tips. there is a pretty decent step-by-step breakdown of his style.

I literally spent countless hours pouring over the Art of Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace book and analyzing his marker styles. If you look at them long enough, you can begin to reverse engineer his technique.

I’m nowhere near as good as he is, but my skills definitely improved exponentially just by aping his stuff.

I find using the light marker first method works really wel , when I mean light…like a Tria Cool gray 1/2 using the fine nib. As when you make a mistake the marker all bleeds togther so kida hide’s your mistakes. Also you can consentrate on the form rather than the detials. Then go over the main lines with a gray 3/4 or wait for it to dry and go over the main lines with the same pen again. I then work up the details with a H .5 pencil lightlight and then go all the way with a good chunky 3B aorund the outside and make it pop.

I have a real problem drawing that nice elipse with a fine linerI always seem to muck it up on the last one. Thank good for the undo button on Alias…sill waiting for my cintiq.

a great book on skethcing can be found from http://www.designsketching.com/ and has a few tuts and guides in it.

dawolfman666,

thanks for posting the link! I am ordering it tonight.

with all the free pics you have on the net…this book doesnt worth the price,
wait for your friend to buy it and read it in class…its a good time-killer

I respectfully disagree about the design sketching book. I bought it a few months ago and after getting it I would have paid double the price for such a great visual reference and library of styles. Well worth the $$$

good for you the net is a free place for getting all the visual ref you need…

Now maybe people in other countries pay more for the book, but I got Design Sketching for $30 from a school bookstore and I can’t believe it took that long to find it. At least half of our studio picked up a copy.

The book has some of the best tips and different styles and techniques out of any book I’ve seen. Having paid hundreds of dollars for other textbooks in my college career which are all crap, I would have easily paid $60 for it.