Pro/e and Alias

Hi everybody!
I’m a motorhomes designer from Italy.
I run with pro/e WF3 and I’m quite happy about it, but I would like to do a step more,
After reading and reading about Alias I would like start to learn it.
But before to start I’ve same question for you:

1)In the past (2004)I’ve received same Alias files in iges format from my supplier , but I’ve spent too much times to stitch the surfaces in pro/e because everysurfaces was disconnected, my supplier said the surfaces in alias
were completely connected, (I’ve changed the accuracy in pro/e but nothing happened).What was my mistakes? For me that was a real problem because I need Pro/e for the normal work and Alias for sketch and surfaces.
2)Do you have same experiences with pro/e and Alias?
3)Surfaces in pro/e works well but I’ve seen Alias tutorial and I’ve to say, It is a incredible surfaces
tool but unfortunately like the every power tool it is quite hard to
learn. I’m curious to read your story.
4)Do you have same tips or initial tutorial?



Ciao
Francesco

1)In the past (2004)I’ve received same Alias files in iges format from my supplier , but I’ve spent too much times to stitch the surfaces in pro/e because everysurfaces was disconnected, my supplier said the surfaces in alias
were completely connected, (I’ve changed the accuracy in pro/e but nothing happened).What was my mistakes? For me that was a real problem because I need Pro/e for the normal work and Alias for sketch and surfaces.

-There are definately tolerances that need to be correctly set up in Alias - but if you pick the default Pro-E setting in construction options it’s probably a good start. WF3 can automatically zip gaps on import and in WF3 it works pretty well. It’s not a perfect process though. Some very complex surfaces, blends that fade out to curvature, small edges can become screwed up. There are definately ways to fix this but sometimes you need to manually merge surfaces together in Pro E so that it can find the connections itself. But once you figure out the workflow it works quite well.

3)Surfaces in pro/e works well but I’ve seen Alias tutorial and I’ve to say, It is a incredible surfaces
tool but unfortunately like the every power tool it is quite hard to
learn. I’m curious to read your story.

I learned Alias on the job with a lot of help from experts in both tools. I think you’d probably want to spend some time learning the Alias basics via tutorials, and then spend the money on professional training to learn the workflow between Alias and Pro E. The power of this is if you learn how to build good surfaces in Alias - they won’t need to be rebuilt in Pro E.

4)Do you have same tips or initial tutorial?

Check design-engine.com for training and the Alias books/online help for tutorials.

i learned alias at college, then on the job modeling tractors, then working for alias in the chicago office.

aliasdesign.autodesk.com has some decent information.

there’s a book by fridolin beisert you can find here:

http://www.amazon.com/Learning-Design-Alias-StudioTools-Hands/dp/product-description/1897177143

this book seems like a decent introduction to the software. studio’s interface has a long history and lots of devoted users so it doesn’t change much from one year to the next. i agree that the interface is hard for beginners but easy for power users.

regarding data transfer to pro-e, do this:

1: find out what tolerances are being used in pro-e for gap and continuity angle and create a construction setting profile in alias that matches. if pro-e is in relative mode and not absolute mode, try estimating the actual gap tolerances. transfer some test models to see if the tolerances are tight enough. do not make the tolerances too tight or alias will quickly make surfaces too dense to be useful.

2: build everything to this tolerance.

unfortunately old models opened in alias with history will not rebuild to new tolerances even if you set the tolerances and then rebuild. surfaces with history remember their original tolerances, so old surfaces will have to be rebuilt from curves. naturally this is not a problem for new surfaces built with the new tolerance settings.

3: stitch before export and make sure there are no bright yellow edges. also get model info/query to see if there are any gaps in the stitched part.

4: export to step, not iges. step carries more data about surface to surface edge connections. better yet, use granite as the exchange format.

5: reimport the step or granite file. when you import the granite you’ll see everything is degree 3 nurbs and sometimes the surfaces have more spans. stitch the model again, correct any gaps, restitch, reexport.

there’s a trick to granite import, at least there used to be, you have to open the options on File > Import > Granite and check one of the option boxes, otherwise you never get any model data on granite imports, just a blank screen.

this extra import/export helps you catch problems before the engineer receiving the pro-e data sees them and complains to his boss and coworkers that alias sucks.

voila.

While Pro/E exports brilliant IGES data, it fucks up while importing. As already mentioned, just check what tolerances you’re working on. I used to work on a lot of IGES data exported from Catia V5, which used to come across as ripped apart…though the part tolerance was 0.00012 or something in Pro/E. There WILL be a loss of data whenever you send it across different platforms.

Pro/E actually has a very good surface repair tool…I used to love the manual drag-and-stitch patchwork shit that Pro/E could do.

3)Surfaces in pro/e works well but I’ve seen Alias tutorial and I’ve to say, It is a incredible surfaces
tool but unfortunately like the every power tool it is quite hard to
learn. I’m curious to read your story.

Both have their own pros and cons and it really depends on what you want to do. I used to do hardcore surface modeling on Pro/E and used to hate every bit of it. Alias (or any other software) is not all that hard to learn…it’s just the interface that you need to get around. Rest is pretty much the same everywhere.

Hi Cyberdemon, Samweis and Desecrator

I’ll follow your tips.



Thanks!

Ciao

Francesco

I use both and don’t really have a problem importing nor exporting.

Hi Bart
I’ve started to work with pro/e in in 1997 (the real name was Ptc /modeller, it was a lower PTC product, just a solid modeller).
Today I’m quite happy about WF3, but after reading and reading about Alias, I’ve started to study it, ten days ago.
The first impression is good but much different rispect Pro/e Style, what is your impression if you use both?





Ciao Francesco

Its funny you ask because i started to learn alias in 1995. I did not really get very far tho till Dan Streng worked with me. 1999 or so…

After meeting all the high end alias folks of Sram, Motorola GM Polaris and I could make a list a mile long… I found I learned modeling technique mostly from rebuilding the alias tutorials and when I rebuilt the tutorials using Pro/ENGINEER.

Now there was one place that I hated about Pro/ENGINEER and that was the ability to use an intelligent workflow for manipulating CV’s like we do in Alias. Push and pull … snap alight tangent or curvature to another surface boundary by first braking construction history… you know the drill. In proe it was always such a pain in the ass to use that it was pointless. I’m talking about the ‘insert’ ‘advanced’ ‘surface freeform’.

Now we have a usable tool in WF4.0 called surface edit. Works just like alias cv manipulations on a surface except w/o the ability to scale the cv’s.
to see a video search ‘bionic finger’ on youtube.


I am by the way on the surfacing technical committee of the development of the surfacing tools for PTC.

Bad…BAD man :imp: :angry: :imp:

I always wanted Pro/E to have better surfacing tools. I’m not talking about freeforms…I don’t know about WF4 but when WF3 came out, I was expecting atleast the basics right, like, simpler sweeps (ones where you can just select 2 curves and you don’t need to sketch the section on some godforsaken normal plane), better ‘n-sided’ surfaces (why the hell do they give those triangulated patches???), lofts using guides etc. I kinda understand that Pro/E tries to follow what’s logically correct and also that it’s forte is not surfacing, but looking at the softwares out there, WF3 was a huge disappointment.

What makes you think that feature is not there? There are many options with the simple sweep tool that makes it not so simple like the ability to select multiple trajectories. Cross non tangent segments. Select previously sketched curves instead of sketching one inside the sweep tool…

If you want to select both trajectory and section you would reqire the option ‘constant section’. Then you can select both trajectory and section as previously defined sketches.

What I meant about the sweep was…you can’t pick any random curve as a section unless it meets a certain number of prerequisites (sketch). Catia, on the other hand, was giving options to directly use a surface edge as a sweep section at the same time (and it’s not really inappropriate to compare Catia & Pro/E). You can always extract that edge and add to the parametric bundle in the model tree…but that takes one extra operation and 5 extra clicks and 7 extra annoying “Are you sures” :stuck_out_tongue:

I know in 3d Studio MAX you can pick any random trajectory and any random section and make a sweep. is that really what you want to be able to do? I don’t think so. But lets think about that some more.