PRATT Masters in ID

PRATT accepts any majors in its MID program. Do you need a portfolio to apply to the Masters in ID at PRATT?

Yes they do require a portfolio.

But shouldn’t you be asking them?

I did post a question to them online and I am just waiting. They said that certain depts may need portfolio. No need to get angry, just trying to find out in a quick way.

Every year Pratt accepts people from different backgrounds.
I believe more of experiences than what majors they had.
There are also numbers of ID background people from all over the
country,and they do exceptionally well in the gradschool.
The good thing is when we get to do research or group works,
ppl from various backgrounds become teams to resolve the problems
rather than pure ID majors with no other educational knowledges except
just ID trying to figure out the problems in closed loop.
There are ppl from Columbia U, Seoul U, other art schools in and out of
the States, business ppl, psychology majors, architecture backgrounds.
Thus it’s not just random. Most of grad students are beginner level in ID
but has different perspectives and mature in lives.
The negatives? Depense on who and where you come from.
If you are already ID background with full of ID knowledges, the group
might seem beginners than you are. Drawings, model makings, handling
shop tools and history of ID are often criticized by our Undergrad teachers and students as we are in our baby steps. But in the long run, people with various backgrounds stand out strongly I believe. Plus changing one’s major and directions are not easy decision for everyone. Thus most of students are strong in their believes and will.

Will I gain the same design experience, knowledge, education in the Masters as the Bachelors? What kind of things do they look for in your portfolio? Thanks man.

I agree 100% that different backgrounds enhance a design education. But from what I saw as an undergrad at Pratt-- as you said, lack of basic ID skills & knowlege among Masters students-- I think a person with a different background should just go into the undergrad program and get a second Bachelor’s. Why should an accounting or english major have a Masters in ID (and a higher salary) when I have a Bachelor degree and better skills & know-how. Having a second Bachelors may (and perhaps should) get them more money, but they are no more qualified in ID than me.

Its funny because who does having people of other backgrounds in the masters program benefit?

The school and the other students in the program. In the meen time the student with the english undergrad suffers, has to extend his/her studies, and struggles to find a job because they are over educated for an entry position in ID but most likely won’t even have an internship under his/her belt.

I would love to see the percentage of ID grad students that went straight into teaching. Isn’t the goal of these programs to produce designers with higher capabilities. Instead they seem to be producing a bunch of acedemics, some of which will never design a product.

I’m sorry to be so harsh, but it really gets me mad that these students are not getting what they are paying for, and because they don’t have an undergrad in an art related feild, they don’t realize that the school is just taking their money. You guys deserve better. And the students you go on to teach will not have the benifit of having an instructor that has practiced the art and science of ID in the real world, and the beat goes on.

Just my highly biased opinion based on my own experiences.

I agree 100% that different backgrounds enhance a design education. But from what I saw as an undergrad at Pratt-- as you said, lack of basic ID skills & knowlege among Masters students-- I think a person with a different background should just go into the undergrad program and get a second Bachelor’s. Why should an accounting or english major have a Masters in ID (and a higher salary) when I have a Bachelor degree and better skills & know-how. Having a second Bachelors may (and perhaps should) get them more money, but they are no more qualified in ID than me.

Have you ever heard that many of instructors are educated in Masters?
Some went to research, some teach computers and they absolutely best at what they do. And Design are not just about modeling and drawings.
Why should people study second Bachelors when they can push themselves into 2 years? I think the Masters program is keep getting stronger even in its portfolios to get in and get out.
As a grad student who has studied with undergrad students in studio classes, I didn’t see much differences in understanding of aesthetics and functions-Dan November class, Toy design & Shoe design were the great examples.

Will I gain the same design experience, knowledge, education in the Masters as the Bachelors? What kind of things do they look for in your portfolio? Thanks man.

I would not say you will gain very same experiences.
However you can take many of Undergrad classes, inter-major classes, and if you understand your weakness, you can also build it through much basic classes. It is all up to your will because in grad, no one will force you much about taking different classes. However there are numbers of requirements that most of students should take-and these I see as intense ID courses for grad students. Be prepare not to sleep much if you want to join. Everyone works really hard just like other ID schools.
How to get in?? Be strong in your portfolio is one, Be smart in interview is next and Understanding yourself that why you want to get in to grad is important. During the interview, the school let you know what will be the weakness and strongest in the department. BTW, school gives so much only if you are willing to study.

Actually most of my own instructors had recently graduated from our own grad program, or another grad program, with little or no working experience.

Whats more scary is that I have bumped into VERY few designers with a masters in the field.

Just another highly biased opinion based on my own observations. I would love to hear all about successful designers with a masters in ID and an undergrad in a non art/design related feild. It would make me feel a whole lot better about all the money the schools charge.

I think there is one. She works for Nike also designing products such as watches. She has a Masters in ID.

Yes my own boss got both his BID and MID at Pratt, and at one point did teach at Pratt. He wished he had not wasted his time on the Masters. Another example is the late Dr. Bill Fogler, who I studied under and who was a great, influential figure at Pratt. I believe he went straight from studying at Pratt to teaching at Pratt.

Because they are missing out on the basic skills that the rest of us learn during those two years… exactly my beef.

Funny you should mention Dan’s Prototypes class, which is exactly where I saw Masters students falling down the hardest.

Thank you for your charitable concern for these pitiable, mostly white, upper middle class graduate students who have to work so hard and pay so much. But I think your concern is a little misplaced. There are numerous examples of successful M.I.D.'s in the world. I would assert that they might travel in slightly different circles than you do though. But then again maybe not…

For example, Core77 began as a graduate thesis project at Pratt 9 years ago. Its founders looked at the world differently. They saw design as being potenially more than just getting out of school and making cars, sneakers or toys. Good thing that they did, otherwise we wouldn’t be having this nice little difference of opinion.

Original work - that is what really creative grown-ups actually attempt to do. So who cares what acronym happens to appear after their names?

you meen in the circles where products get designed? I thought that was kind of the point of getting an Industrial design education.

My own point being that the percentage of graduate students that move into this particular circle of product design might be a bit low and it is something that a potential graduate student SHOULD be concerned about, no matter what color, gender, or creed that person happens to be. Honestly I don’t know what that has to do with being jipped out of like $50g’s.

I think core77 is an awesome example of grad students doing something that can only be described as freaking great, unfortunately, from my observation, this is the exception rather than the norm.

Perhaps the same could be said of undergrads?

You should of visit Corvettes to Cuisinart at Pratt, which is the exhibition of six decades of diversity in ID. Graduated from Pratt, working for the professional ID fields. Many has MID at Pratt. Please don’t narrow your vision based on your own experience and knowledge-which is again what I learned in my own school.
The exhibition will be closed this Saturday at 6PM with closing party. I think many of IDers will be there to talk and chill.
From my experiences at D. November class, we had 4 grad students in the class and 8 undergrads. 4 grad always finished the projects on time and the finished models were in high condition, all working and actually foldable.
But there were only 3 undergrad students were done with the same projects,and I’ve seldom seen rest of them coming into the class. But all of them talked really great, which is important for presenting yourself. Same in my other studio and prototypes. I’m not saying who makes the great stuff at school. There are obviously good and bad students everywhere no matter what school, what degree and what your backgrounds are.

I was at the opening of the exhibit and saw & met many of the designers, yes many were MID Pratt Alum. Don’t get me wrong-- of course there are a lot of very capable and talented designers with Masters degrees. Several of them were freinds of mine at school and were high caliber designers. I would even say that going for a masters indicates how serious a person is about their design education.

Generalizing is always dangerous, but I think many designers (and employers) would agree that two or three years of work experience is worth at least as much or more than an advanced degree. I don’t mean to degrade your education, this is just a fact.

I will try to make it to the closing party at the gallery on Saturday, and I hope to see you there.

-jm

Design is a much larger enterprise than simply producing objects.

As for students, I will hold my nose so as to avoid smelling the sanctimony here by simply replying, “caveat emptor” - buyer beware. There are plenty of avenues (this being a pretty good one) to warn people about the uncertainties of a career in design.

Graduate students typically think that the school owes them answers about what they should be when they grow up. They must use the cirriculum to find this out on their own - through hard work, constant questioning of everything and everyone - and most importantly, of themselves.

The ones who emerge from this personal struggle successfully, “succeed.” The ones that don’t, sell mutual funds or simply continue to make crappy art-furniture in a garage in Brooklyn. And yes, there are plenty of undergraduates who don’t “succeed” too.

But why do you really care? What are your interests apart from preaching from the standpoint of some arbitrary, undergraduate bias?

Wow, I didn’t realize it was a bad thing to care, or that I was being arbitrary.

Actually I am being quite specific about a phenomenon that I have noticed all over the US, and that is, after working at a consulting firm for 5 years and meeting probably a few hundred Product designers who design objects, very few of them had masters degrees. Now, working for the past 2 years at a corporation that employs about 150 Industrial Designers, there might be 1 that has a masters.

Why do I care? Because if you are accepted into a program that is supposed to teach you how to become an Industrial Designer (a designer for industry of objects as I am defining it) and you do not have the ability to do so upon graduation, there is a real problem. Either the school should not have accepted the student based on abilities (and you should have some abilities before getting into a masters) or the school does not have a quality program. In both cases it is a disservice to the student and even worse to the profession because I believe it devalues the feild.

That is why I care. Shoot me.

I’m not saying that there are not great designers who have Grad degrees, like I said, I know a couple, but only that if you want a job in INDUSTRIAL DESIGN, in my opinion the statistics are more in your corner if you go to an undergrad program like UC. I am specificly talking about designing THINGS. I don’t think I could be any more clear in this statement.

As is obvious, this is of course based on my personal experience and bias… Cordy my friend, your post is based on the same things. As my grandma allways said, it takes one to know one.

Yo, you seem a bright individual yet I can sense sadness and anger in your writings…why?

YO, yo talking to me? Yo talking to me? Yo talking to me?