Need advice on graphics cards pertaining to speed & pic

Hey guys

I read in another post that NVidia is better to use as a card. I’m planning on buying a i5 or i7 Quad CPU with 4-8 GB of RAM.

*Bunkspeed told me I need to get any of below:

NVIDIA Quadro 5010M (3 GB, 384 CUDA cores)
NVIDIA Quadro 5000M (2 GB, 320 CUDA cores)
NVIDIA Quadro 4000M (2 GB, 336 CUDA cores)


Geforce Series:
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 580 (3GB, 512 CUDA cores)


Quadro Series:
NVIDIA Quadro 6000 (6.0 GB, 448 CUDA cores)**
NVIDIA Quadro 5000 (2.5 GB, 352 CUDA cores)**

*Can I get away with a AMD Radeon HD6490M 512MB graphics card?
I mean if we are talking about a couple of minutes longer in speed then I don’t care. But if it is hours or quality in picture then I do care. Does anyone know?

need advice

If you are going to go with ATI, stay away from the Radeon line, they are gaming cards. ATI’s FirePro cards are meant for workstation graphics.

You may also want to check with the software you plan to run. Most 3D CAD software companies keep a list of the graphics cards that have been certified to run their programs.

And don’t skimp on the system RAM, 4-8 GB’s may not be enough these days. I’ve seen people run 24 GB’s!

In all honestly it’s just about how much money you want to spend. My 3 year old MBP could run hypershot just fine/keyshot as well.

Those cards a pricey. The Quadro 4000 is $750. That GTX 580 is $500. That’s some serious cash. I’d get a GTX 560, save $300 and get a better processor, better/more RAM. Obviously if you got the money then go for it, but honestly that seems like way overkill. I guess it depends on what you are rendering as well.

Still, it’s all about how much money you are looking to spend. At school, we all run laptops and run all the software just fine with reasonable times.

If Shot is going to be your primary tool I would actually go for the GTX line. Shot uses CUDA as an architecture so ATI is not even an option. The Quadro cards will have better driver support in some other tools, but that may not be important. What other tools do you need to run?

Also, what do you expect to be rendering. Mostly small object, typical “ID” product shots? Or do you expect to be bringing in very complex engineering data sets that will have a lot of internal parts and polygons? That will help determine how much RAM you should get on the card.

If your budget is very constrained the GTX 560 isn’t a bad idea either. The 460/560 have been my recommendation for a while now, I run a 580 myself at the moment.

I completely agree. Definitely check the software manufacturers recommendations. I have had good luck with Nvidia quadro’s. They are very pricey so I usually go second hand on them. Our guys have running quadro FX4600 on Cimatron and really seeing the speed. 3 weeks or less turn around means they can’t wait on a huge file to render slowly.

Enjoy the new toy! :smiley:

Edit -

I have had nothing but frustration with Geforce cards. They burn up fast (brand new) or plain do not work with Master Cam, no matter what their speed.

Thanks guys/ all a big help. I normally render average size ID stuff so I can economize in the high price card area.

[quote=“jurrasix”]In all honestly it’s just about how much money you want to spend. My 3 year old MBP could run hypershot just fine/keyshot as well.

Those cards a pricey. The Quadro 4000 is $750. That GTX 580 is $500. That’s some serious cash. I’d get a GTX 560, save $300 and get a better processor, better/more RAM. Obviously if you got the money then go for it, but honestly that seems like way overkill. I guess it depends on what you are rendering as well.

Still, it’s all about how much money you are looking to spend. At school, we all run laptops and run all the software just fine with reasonable times.[/quote]

You run Hypershot off of a Mac Book Pro? It has a AMD Radeon graphics card. Did you put a GTX 560 in it?

Hypershot is/was CPU based, which means your GPU has no impact on performance.

Bunkspeed Shot (there new product) is GPU/CPU based - which relies very heavily on GPU per their recommendations.

Keyshot is the same as Hypershot which means it is CPU based, no impact on rendering performance due to GPU.

If you are using an old copy of Hypershot then skip the GPU altogether. The GTX 460/560 is a decent bet - the 460 can be found for $100 these days on sale.

You may find this interesting, I got this reply from Bunkspeed after inquiring about what card to get. I was split between some quadro card and the gtx590.

I do not recommend the gtx590 - as it splits the memory on two chips, leaving you with insufficient memory: 1.5 usable memory (rather than 3g).
I do recommend the Gtx 580: 3 G of memory, and 512 cuda cores.
You can have 1 card (around $400), or run two (2 cards would only be 3G - since memory is not additive - but you would double the cuda cores with 2 Gtx 580 cards: 1024 cuda cores).

Yeah that’s correct. The *90 series is Nvidias “SLI on a single board” solution - which means it is identical to running 2 GTX 580’s 1.5gb in SLI, it has 3gb of memory on the board, but you can only use 1.5 of it total since it’s really a marketing spin.

Would still give you blistering fast performance, especially if you can live with the 1.5gb memory overhead (which most product designers probably can - I don’t think you’d break past that until you were rendering HUGE data sets like entire automobiles, complete with interior,etc)

In reality 2 GTX 580’s would be about the same price, but it requires you have a motherboard that supports SLI, a power supply with enough juice, and a case that is well ventilated enough to support the massive amount of heat they’ll generate.

If you were really building a system specifically for GPU rendering, you could also go with a Triple SLI setup using GTX 560’s 2gb cards and get 1152 cores + 2GB of ram for $600. That would be your best bang for the buck but you’d need a very big tower.

Also, the Nvidia “Kepler” architecture is being released this spring which should have serious performance improvements over the current “Fermi” architecture.