Modelling Ski Goggles

Hey everyone,

has anyone had any experience with modeling a pair of ski/snowboard goggles? possibly in solidworks?

i’d appreciate any tips & advice

cheers

COMPOUND CURVES (OR 3D SKETCES), SURFACES ONLY, AND BUILD ONLY HALF AT A TIME… THEN MIRROR. USING A AKETCH AS UN UNDERLAY HELPS TOO!

ALSO USE THE SPLINE TOOL EXTENSILVLY, AS C3 CURVATURE IS PRETTY MUCH MANDATORY…

IT CAN BE DONE - GOOD LUCK!

break it down in to simple surfaces don’t try and do every feature in one go, keep the number of your spans, CV points low. Might be worth posting something up on the alias forum.

thanks very much guys, really appreciate your input. hopefully I’ll have something to show pretty soon

maybe you should start out with something more on the simple. You will use lots of projected curves and surface offsets.

Luke: I love that red chair on you portfolio. Remember it from one photoreal competition

wahooo…ta…That was my first thing in alias I did…probably the most complex, I should go back and tidy it up one day.

Well untill SWX fixes the 3d curve creation tool. hasn’t been right for years now. Projectec curve method works but you loose a lot of control over the surface. But not much other options, and it will create a good result.

i Know it can be done, A buddy of mine in school made one in solid works as apart of his senior thesis, then brought it into Alias/Maya to finish it up.

He said it wasn’t too hard to do.

We designed and modeled a pair with Burton a few years ago. The key was getting the face form geometry established in relation to the lens plane arc so that the lens does not distort the vision or buckle as it flexes to fit the range of face shapes.

Hey thanks for your tips, I had a go at the goggles…what do you all think?

Also comments welcome about the designs themselves and not just the lack of CAD ability.

thanks a lot



If you want us to comment on the design, then show your sketches. Cus I don’t have many positive things to comment based on the rendering.

It would have been cool in the Star Wars era.

thanks for your input, do you have any tips on the rendering? It was done on photoworks…I find it hard to get correct lighting.

Well, I don’t have any experience with photoworks, so I can’t comment on the usage of software.

Generally, the model itself needs to have good surfacing to begin with, or else it doesn’t matter how good you are at lighting, the rendering will still look bad.

You really shouldn’t use back lighting if your intention isn’t to show the rear details.

how did you get on? what did they look like in the end?

take a look above…more block model then curvy

Well it is a start. You are learning the software, but you are approaching it from a too simple solid modelling approach. It looks like you did a bunch of cut extrudes and fillets on a base extrusion. Not a good method really. Think about lofts or sweeps when constructing a goggle.

Also start looking at the surfacing tuts that come with Solidworks.

I actually dont mind blockiness if it is intentional, but from your screen shots it really does look like the software drove the form.

luke,

send me some tips on modeling those goggles - I projected the curves onto a railed arc surface to create my lens and then railed the area around to create the first part but am stuck. I dont think Ill be achieving g2…! :confused:

some screen shots would help…I have to say I’ve never modelled goggles before, but did some Class-A training in alias a couple of years back so just repeating their tips.

Idea is great, And manufacturable but not functional.

Some of the sharp points of the nose piece are too close to flat edges.

It is important to think about the lifespan of the product. I can think of resins that will work, but be too expensive for the product.

Remember when your instructor told you to keep wall thickness as uniform as possible?

You will not specify the resin used in most cases. If you design a tiny radius in some spots the mold will fill better.