manufacturing of sugar

Does anybody know if its possible to produce sugar as a sheet of paper. They make mints as thin as a paper, i was wondering if soemthing similar is possible for sugar as well, or if sugar could be powdered real small and compressed to form a sheet of paper. i am looking for something like this for my design project.

You can’t make it in the same process as paper, the suger will dissolve in water and won’t attach to the screen like paper pulp will. You would have to combine the sugar with a substrate.

I am no cook, but I would look into melting the sugar and pouring it flat onto a surface. I think depending on how hot you cook the sugar can be everything from pliable to brittle. Julia Child may be your answer.

i am looking for a way in which sugar can be made in the form of a paper…sugar exists currently as crystals, cubes, powder, i was wondering if we can manufacture it such that it comes in sheets…in other words, edible sugar sheets that “should” dissolve" in water or milk as fast as sugar crystals do. pouring sugar syrup would nto help as after coolin, it would crystalize to sugar again.

well, cotton candy is spun…

http://www.popcornsupply.com/Scripts/prodList.asp?idCategory=26

take some cotton-candy and flatten it between two warm plates (surfaces), and cut to shape. don’t know how opaque you could get it; would probably a function of weight (of candy) per square inch.

if you took the bowl off of this machine it would fling molten sugar out, right. replace the bowl with a cylinder and put the machine on a lift so that it could be raised up through the center of the cylinder. by varying the speed of the lift you could deposit as much sugar on the indside of the cylinder as you wanted.

line the inside of the cylinder with bakers’ parchment, or wax paper, so you can remove the spun sugar… cut the paper/sugar material and lay it out flat… and then cut to shape…

maybe…

the photographic images that you see on cakes…

http://www.tastyfotoart.com/EdiblePaper.htm

You also need to keep it from melting or dissolving when you touch it and figure out a way to keep the sheets from sticking together.

It sounds like you’re considering using these as sweeteners for drinks, right? Then you also need to consider volume. A teaspoon of sugar is about 5 cubic centimeters (5000mm^3). A piece of paper is around .13mm thick. To have the same amount of sugar as a teaspoon, the piece of paper needs to have an area of around 38500 mm^2. That’s almost an 8" x 8" sheet, which is going to be pretty difficult to stuff into a coffee cup.

To avoid an 8" x 8" sheet (bouncing off Scott’s post more than the original thought), then the sugar’s container could dissolve.