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Kickstarter FAQ: Guidelines for Hardware and Product Design Projects
http://www.kickstarter.com/blog/faq-guidelines-for-hardware-and-product-design-pro
On Thursday we announced new guidelines for Hardware and Product Design projects on Kickstarter, including prohibiting product simulations, renderings, and offering multiple quantities of a reward. Today we wanted to answer some common questions we’ve seen in response. Thanks for reading.

Kickstarter announced that it’s prohibiting product renderings in the Hardware and Product Design categories, but “rendering” can mean a lot of things. What does Kickstarter mean?

To clarify, we mean photorealistic renderings of a product concept. Technical drawings, CAD designs, sketches, and other parts of the design process will continue to be allowed. Seeing the guts of the creative process is important. We love that stuff. However renderings that could be mistaken for finished products are prohibited.

Do the new guidelines mean that Kickstarter will only accept Hardware and Product Design projects with finished products?

Not at all. We simply ask creators to share with backers exactly what’s been done so far, show how the product currently works, and explain how it will be completed. In short, we expect creators to show their work. Backers have shown that they’re happy to get involved in projects that are in earlier stages when the creator is clear about the remaining work and their ability to complete it.

Do the new guidelines apply beyond Hardware and Product Design projects that are developing new products?

No. The new guidelines only apply to Hardware and Product Design projects that are developing new products. These guidelines do not apply to Design projects like the LowLine and +Pool or Hardware projects like Stompy: The Giant Rideable Walking Robot. Why? They aren’t developing new products that backers are expecting in their mailboxes.

How will Kickstarter know whether something is a simulation or rendering?

We may not know. We do only a quick review to make sure a project meets our guidelines. If an obvious simulation or photorealistic rendering is spotted during that review, that project will not be allowed to launch. If a simulation or photorealistic rendering is discovered after a project launches, that project will be canceled. Everyone should continue to use their best judgment when deciding whether or not to back a project.

Kickstarter announced that Hardware and Product Design rewards could only be offered in single quantities. What if my product works best as a pair or as a set of five?

As we noted in the announcement, sensible sets are fine. If your piece of hardware is best offered as a set of five, that’s okay, however you couldn’t also offer it as a single piece. Creators will have to decide what works best for their project.

Final thoughts?

We created Kickstarter so more creative work could exist in the world, and last week’s changes are in service of that mission. We’re confident that these updates will lead to an even better Kickstarter. Thanks for sharing your thoughts with us, and thanks for being a part of it!

This changes the game somewhat. A demonstration of one’s ability to provide a tangible result in exchange for money.

From it’s inception, my concern has been that posting Kickstarter projects on CORE lessens the credibility of Industrial Design (represented on these boards). We’ve all seen a lot of schlock posted on CORE that could barely be called “designed”; in most cases it’s not a request for critique, or assistance from the group, but more of a shill for money. I don’t like it. It implies that CORE is endorsing the “designer” and cheapens the profession.

With the requirement, perhaps suggestion is the proper word, that they (KS) want to see CAD work, sketches, development work, and prototypes, it strengthens the public’s understanding of what it actually take to launch a product … vs. what it takes to appear to be able develop a product.

Thanks for posting this zip.