junior designer salary????

does anybody know exactly what a junior designer earns?
25K-25K?

That depends a lot on where you live. A designer in NYC will make more than a designer in Florida most times, but the cost of living in NYC is much higher.

Also, salary isn’t everything. Think about benefits too. Health coverage, flex time or vacation time, 401k… A high salary but no medical benefits may sound great at first, but once you need a doctor it won’t seem so wonderful.

Like stated above…all relative to where you live…also depends on size of company.

A junior at a consulting firm in NYC might hardly make anything…whereas a junior in a corporate environment could pull in 45-50K+

You don’t even say how many years of experience you have either.

A junior desginer with 1 yr experience is going to make less than one with 3. :unamused:

morons with this type of shot in the dark general questiosn shouldn’t be making over 20k in ANY industry, even fast food franchises.

“25k-25k”… is this a sitcom?

To answer your question seriously Im working as a Junior Designer for a well known firm in NYC, MFA, 4 years exp, making 60K.

Making 61k at a SF consultancy. 2 years out of school[under grad.] Started at 50k.

50k seems about right for an average salary in SF, NYC, Boston, Chi. 45-55 is a the right range. With that, you’ll still be scraping with city rent $ in those cities.

Obviously, those figures are equivalent to 25-35 in smaller cities where a cup of coffee is still 50 cents and a 2 bed apartment with a view is $500 a month.

“To each they own, nigga.”

was that an appropriate ending remark? let’s keep a level of professionalism here please.

Im kinda new here and im curious about salaries myself. It seems that salaries deffinetly range across the board for those who are just out of school. This makes me wonder about what percentage of ID’ers new to the work force are actually the cream of the crop and stand out from the crowd. Ive noticed different professional attitudes from different people, does that play a big part in what kind of money to expect to make as a “junior” designer? For those that pay their dues in the begining, what can one expect to make with 5, 8 or 10 years of experience in the field?? Also, as a freelance designer, what can one expect to make on thier own? I understand the factors are greater as a freelancer, but with the right motivation, professionalism, talent and luck it seems that the sky is the limit.

Im kinda new here and im curious about salaries myself. It seems that salaries deffinetly range across the board for those who are just out of school. This makes me wonder about what percentage of ID’ers new to the work force are actually the cream of the crop and stand out from the crowd. Ive noticed different professional attitudes from different people, does that play a big part in what kind of money to expect to make as a “junior” designer? For those that pay their dues in the begining, what can one expect to make with 5, 8 or 10 years of experience in the field?? Also, as a freelance designer, what can one expect to make on thier own? I understand the factors are greater as a freelancer, but with the right motivation, professionalism, talent and luck it seems that the sky is the limit.

essential info:
years of experience?
city or region?
design concentration?
education?

Like any job, it really depends on what you bring to the company. I walked into my first job out of school at $70K, working for a small firm, but that was the going rate for designers during the boom. My work was more focused on interaction design with some graphic design tied in. 4 Years later I work for a big corp, and this year I will clear six figures. The key here is not just being a CAD Monkey, even straight out of school. Study things other than just design, like marketing, usability, technology, and you’ll be worth much more to the company, thus being able to demand a higher salary.

Lots of my friends hate on me because of what I make, but I dont see them working from 8am to 7pm five days a week. Another key to growing your salary quickly is to gain more training experience (preferred to be company paid) while you’re working for hte company. Any good company who wants to grow their employees should be willing to sponsor the occasional off-site training course. With those courses (say: Project Management) comes professional growth, and an ability to bring more to the table.

Good luck.

+1

I think they kinda talked a little about this attituted at the IDSA conference last week. I think the candidates they are starting to look for are the ones that have a wider understanding of the business.

I walked into my first job out of school at $70K, working for a small firm, but that was the going rate for designers during the boom.

Where?

60K in LA

Boston
BFA
5 years exp
35K

www.salary.com

Industrial Designer I--------25th%ile--------Median--------75th%ile
US national Average--------$40,006--------$44,140--------$48,903

Industrial Designer II-------25th%ile--------Median--------75th%ile
US national Average--------$47,523--------$54,425--------$58,015

Industrial Designer III------25th%ile--------Median--------75th%ile
US national Average--------$58,028--------$65,496--------$72,041

You can slice by state to see how real the data is. For example:
Industrial Designer II -------25th%ile--------Median--------75th%ile
Boston, MA-------------------$52,466--------$60,085--------$64,049

Maybe a worthwhile source for your compensation negotiations.

My no designer friend just got an offer for 110k in NYC, not ID though. He has an MBA degree and got an offer from some finance firm.

I wonder doing ID can ever make one that salary. Should I take a GMAT and spend a year at a good MBA program? and say bye bye to ID for good?

I’m pondering the MBA route myself because unless you want to live in NYC or LA (I don’t because I enjoy bike racing and kayaking), you’re probably not going to pull that kind of money with ID. Maybe in management, but don’t be fooled into thinking that there is a LOT of money in this business. There simply isn’t. The money is in marketing and with advanced business skills.

Forget learning Alias and Solidworks…just master Excel. That’s all people seem to care about now.