I try to love Marketers...I truly do....

Every time I feel that I am gaining respect for the Product Marketing Industry someone goes and yanks the rug out from under me. What is it with the blind obsession to treat a product like a NASCAR vehicle and make the logo as big as possible and not consider at all how stupid it makes the product look?

Because they believe it will sell better and function like free advertising for the brand when others see the product in use? “You should spot it from 500m distance!”

What I hate more is when they have opinions on the product design itself, and that every form should be influenced by the logo. Or if you already have a shape that resembles the logo, the logo should go in it.

At times, it’s hard to oppose “free advertising better sales” with “it looks stupid”. Have you got any arguments to share?

I have a friend who works as marketer at Intel, and they made some freebie-beanies to give away at fairs and events. What they did though was put the logo on the inside, figuring people don’t want to be walking billboards, but instead they would see this logo every time the put the beanie on. I loved that idea, it was a good looking, discreet black beanie that I wouldn’t mind wearing in public. What happened was that almost no consumers got it, and thought it was a production failure that was being dumped on them, and threw it away. Not even those that were explained the intention seemed convinced. People are mostly irrational in their purchase decisions (and are extra cautious when something is free), and attribute way to much value to brands and logos. So don’t just blame the marketers on this one, they often have their reasons.

I remember looking at t-shirts at an auto-race. The gent running the stand was British and the t-shirts from F1, therefore European in origin. I asked if he had any t-shirts that had a discreet front and maybe a bigger logo on the back. He responded, “Europeans only care about what they can see, which is the front of the shirt.”

IP: It’s funny, all my clients want to hide their logos. Maybe you should always make the logo the 60% of the size you want. Then the marketing guy will tell you to make it 40% bigger, which is what you really wanted.

Sometimes those guys just want to have input into the project.

I do this all the time. 85% of the time the client is looking for their logo to be “As Big As Possible” thinking it will get noticed. I size it appropriately, then make it slightly smaller. When they inevitably come back wanting it larger, it’s right where it needs to be. Works great.

Sneaky. I love it.

I do this all the time. 85% of the time the client is looking for their logo to be “As Big As Possible” thinking it will get noticed. I size it appropriately, then make it slightly smaller. When they inevitably come back wanting it larger, it’s right where it needs to be. Works great.

Switch Bait? :wink:

I’ve run into this problem a lot.

One thing you can point out is the size of Apple’s logo on their products - it’s usually very small. Hell, it’s not even on the FRONT of most of their products. But, you know immediately it’s an Apple because of the strength of the Visual Brand Language.

Hahaha! Almost… Except in the end I’m not trying to screw them, I’m trying to help them.

Hahaha! Almost… Except in the end I’m not trying to screw them, I’m trying to help them.

It worked(s) with engineering prototypes as well. We used to add “sacrificial” details to concept models so that the suits would have something to gravitate to - rendering our “sacred” details essentially invisible.

One of my professors worked at Mattel (I think). He would always add useless and stupid features to toys so the suits could remove something. “let’s save $.05 and take that off.” One time he designed a boat with all kinds of fishing poles and cranes and nets. He was so upset that the suits didn’t take anything off!

One time he designed a boat with all kinds of fishing poles and cranes and nets. He was so upset that the suits didn’t take anything off!



Oh what a tangled web we weave,
When first we practise to deceive! - Sir Walter Scott

because in the end (as taught in mba school) brand is far more valuable than any product.

except what all those MBA and marketers don’t realize is that if done correctly, your product design IS your brand. Case in point, Apple. You could pick up an Apple device with no logo and I’d bet you’d immediately guess Apple by the design, materials, fit, finish, etc.

Any good design should have the brand’s DNA incorporated in it. If not, not only is the design weak, but then the brand likely is too. Slapping a giant logo on poorly design things that don’t fit the brand does NOT strengthen the brand or do anyone any good…

R

hey to them brand is logo, period.

not sure who you mean by “they”, but that’s the problem. It’s not.






case in point.




R

its on the market, sells, makes a profit, good by me :laughing:

Several factors at play here:

  1. we as designers tend to overestimate the general public’s comprehension of brand. they do need to see the logo on the product routinely while they’re using it to have any hope of brand recall.

  2. the best results for brand recall happen when the packaging works in concert with the product. more companies need to realize this and stop treating packaging as a separate independent component! packaging has more to do with sell-through than the product when consumers are making their selections, often because most packaging is poorly designed and doesn’t allow the consumer to understand or experience the product. again, needs to be all part of 1 design process, packaging + product.

  3. most corporate reps think brand = logo. in fact, most do not know the difference between a logo and a logo mark. much less which consumers are more likely to recall.

  4. designers are the experts. pulling a bait switch is just client management, it’s a good thing. they are paying you to get them to the right answer, even when they don’t have a clue what that is and you have to trick them to get there!!

mel

I could not have said this better myself especially point 2. This relates back to some of the points that I have made in other posts that packaging is not just a dust cover and it needs to be taken just as seriously as the product. This means that IDers should not just think “oh well the graphic guys will do it” because if we put attention towards it we can create a much better experience at shelf which means better sales.