Horizon10

I read a little about this meeting after seeing it on Cores hompage. Some of those names I recoggnized and some I didn’t but I started reading that action list they have I got to wondering how these guys really know what’s going on. Its not like they are out of work or anything. Its like Bush saying the economy has turned a corner when bad news keeps coming. Am I the only one besides Core who wonders how good a meeting like that is when most of them are priveleged white guys.

If you go over the list of attendees, you’ll see that these people were invited because they are either the principal or senior designer for most of the major design contractors and product manufacturers in North America. To imply that they’re privileged is wrong. None of the people inherited their position. They worked. You know, got a job. That’s J-O-B. “I started reading that action list they have I got to wondering how these guys really know what’s going on.” Huh? You’re going to have to explain this one. How can having a job, in most cases a job as senior so-and-so for big shot company so-and-so, make a person out of contact with “what’s really going on”? It would seem to me that they would know “what’s going on,” at least within the realm of their jobs. Also, take a good look at the group. They’re not all white men.

its a get together for some of the bigger minds in the industry to plan what will be over the horizon in ten years. So naturally it will compromise (mostly) of middle aged white men who don’t really get into the trenches so as much as a new graduate would,…Meaning that it would put them out of touch of the day to day aspects of design. Much in the same way a CEO has a direction and relies on those below to figure out the details to make it succeed. Is that bad? Not really, as long as they have gone through it before and can remember and relate to going through those experiences.

As for know what is going on, they are looking at the broader implications of what will happen, not so much the specifics of whats going on now. They made some good points and some, well lets just say that there is a reason god gave us egos,…I liked the point that they made about how designers are inherent optimists and utopianists, but unnatural skeptics; making impartial design research more difficult. Does point out an intesting problem.

Globalization:
What’s good for one is not good for all> ;
Maximize the local;
Diversity of work, not more products; and
Language is a huge obstacle> .
Design-led process:
Leadership is based on persuasiveness and credibility> ;
Problem could be lack of credibility in design literacy;
Design and marketing should work as a team> ;
It is not about leading, but cohesiveness;
In every other discipline, the expert rules the day but, in design, “everyone is a designer;”
Industrial design has changed, more is demanded than the initial sketch> ;
Not design-led process, but process is design-led;
Design has to take responsibility for failures;
Skills have to be honed;
Make design more inclusive; and
Create a CDO, Chief Design Officer> .
Cross-disciplinary/cross-industry functions:
It’s an old idea, but now in service to the experience;
Commitments have to be made much earlier to come to a finished goal/product;
Other business and professions are already having cross-disciplinary/cross-industry conversations-where do the designers fit in and where will they fit in?;
Perceptual gaps are a big problem> ;
Leadership training may give designers credibility> ;
The change has to start at the universities;
Communication (or a common language) between departments is key; and
Should be taken on a case-by-case basis-Apple and Dell have very different approaches, but both are right.
Holistic design approach (this theme was integrated into the previous):
MDA, Master’s of Design Administration:
Carnegie Mellon combined/cross-pollinated design and English in a Master’s programs to make up for weaknesses in the foundation curriculum (designers can’t write, writers can’t design);
It begins with education-this is the first step in the "Deliver: process for the design message;
50 percent of the students in industrial design graduate degree programs are not American> , many are even funded by their home government; and
Start earlier-grammar school.

Brilliant insight from “either the principal or senior designer for most of the major design contractors”. With some xenophobia thrown in with their egos. Is it any wonder IDSA is worthless?

nice to see someone getting together, but i’m REALLY not sure what they accomplished.

“We made progress on hashing out the core of the profession in the future and it sounds a lot like what most of us are trying to do: multidisciplinary, high-level strategy coupled with real world propositions while seeking truth and a holistic design approach. I think I also got some clearer ideas about the direction of the industrial design movement. See? Already, that’s new. We’re back to the feeling of a movement.”

  • Tucker Viemeister, FIDSA, SpringtimeUSA

shorter: we got together and realized its what we are doing now, believing that we are much more important than we really are while trying to find new ways of being relevant.

I was invited but had better things to do… like work. My bossman went instead. He said it was a waste of time. He said… him, Brunner and a few others were embarrassed to be there.

The most relevant and inspirational gatherings are outside are industry. Go to those. Forget interdisiplinary BS within our industry and try interindustry instead.

anons only? :wink:

[quote=“WOT”]I was invited but had better things to do… like work. My bossman went instead. He said it was a waste of time. He said… him, Brunner and a few others were embarrassed to be there.quote]

:exclamation: