HELP! No Experience No Job??????????

How can a newly graduated industrial designer get a job if every company requires you to have 3 or more years of experience. This is very frustrating! Please Help!

It takes peristence, lots of it. The first few years may be the toughest, but it’s also when you have less responsibilities. On the positive side, when you are fresh out of school you are more flexible, have more energy and willing to take on whatever is available. When I first started I was doing all kinds of stuff just to keep busy, the experience eventually piles up before you know it. Just enjoy your youth while can.

I have the same problem. I gardauted almost a year ago and still can not get the job. I am graphic designer and have MFA degree. I send resumes every day to any of those job posting over internet and I am really frustrated even I have behind of me quiet years of experience in the field. :frowning:

Don’t just check the ads, you need to be talking to people and finding out what other companies are in your area. You would be amazed at how many design companies or companies with design departments don’t have obvious listings, websites, etc. I have found a number of these and they always work out. A lot of times there will be a satellite office of a major company in your area and you won’t even know it.

I started sending things out months ago to find a new job and it wasn’t until I stopped actively looking to focus on moving to a different city that people started to call me with opportunities. I had no idea that they were in the area but they saw my resume on dice, coroflot, career builder, etc. There can be a serious lag between when you post your information and when people come calling.

If things get really desperate you can do this, get a job at a bar or restaurant to pay the bills, then in your off time find a design firm and ask them if you can work as an intern or just have some space in their office to work during the day. Say that you are looking to gain experience and don’t need to be paid (or not very much anyways). Then spend every second in that office making yourself absolutely invaluable to everyone to the point that the office doesn’t function properly when you aren’t there.

Then when you aren’t there because you are waiting table they will hopefully realize that they really need you and want to bring you on fulltime. I have made myself invaluable to my current employer and now that Ive decided to leave to do other things they are throwing all kinds of incentives at me to stay.

Best thing to do is to enrol in an ID program that fosters co-op/internships like CCS or ArtCenter. If you have prior internship experience it’ll be the ticket to securing a job right after grad. If I was an HR I’d hire the person with Intership exp. over someone without (all things being equal).

Although restaurant jobs can be fairly lucrative you might want to think about finding a temporary job with a local manufacturer. I’ve known many students who have worked as a laborer for an injection molder or furniture manufacturer while looking for their first ID gig.

The idea is that you are gaining very valuable experience in manufacturing processes and at the same time showing potential employers that you are committed. -You also often make as much as a starting designer.

Make up some work for unexisting small companies, like logo design, bla.
It won’t land you a job “per se” but it will help fill up the cv

…mmjohns is spot on…only 4% of job seekers find work from www and only 15% find work from any ad…network…network…network…you are about 4 people removed from finding your dream job…

Find a recruiter that works with ID’s…they have inside contact information, that the typical job seeker, never could learn or know about.

If you are competing only for advertised positions you’re in for a long rough ride, friend. Do the exact contrary of what 99% of newly minted designers do and avoid job postings altogether to take a more personal business approach. You have something to sell - now, let’s see who is a potential buyer. Forget the school definition of design employment, and fast! It’s depressingly outdated and out of touch with business reality at the end of 2005.

First make a concise list of your strongest DEMONSTRABLE skills that enough firms cannot do without to survive and prosper. If you end up as another portfolio artist you’re just flowing with the masses and difficult to pick up.

The key however is to approach firms (ALL kinds) not on other designers’ radar - the less traditional or totally unknown design employers - who are not necessarily less needy of design skills in their activities. Schools have always done a lousy job in helping graduates tap into the enormous REAL market that exists for designers skills because they’re too preoccupied with selling the comfortable stereotypical magazine-ready image of ID they’ve lazily expoused unchallenged for years. Change is not academia’s forte but it has to become yours if you are intent on living off design in America today.

It takes polished communication skills and great motivation to preach to the unconverted but the payback is great when you succeed in the form of lifelong converts and almost endless work. There are actually entire industries out there unaffected by design yet their needs are painfully obvious even to the casual observer.

Stop standing in line to knock on doors and get creative where very few others attempt to. This approach alone is often sufficient to convince someone to hire you, a student portfolio being secondary in real life to such proof of forward thinking and personal initiative.

Switch from selling drawings to selling tangible benefits one can put a value on and you’ll be amazed to discover how many people never knew you existed but could have used your talents for years.

mmjohns,

I had no idea that they were in the area but they saw my resume on dice, coroflot, career builder, etc.

What do you list yourself as on dice? They don’t have category for Industrial Designers.

i have a strong passion and talent for interior design but i have been working in the fashion industry for 5 years and have no official int design experience. how can i make the transition? would love to go to school, but can’t afford to quit my job. FIT - the least expensive program in NY - does not allow you to get a degree if you go part time. how do you get in the door in this situation?

i have a strong passion and talent for interior design but i have been working in the fashion industry for 5 years and have no official int design experience. how can i make the transition? would love to go to school, but can’t afford to quit my job. FIT - the least expensive program in NY - does not allow you to get a degree if you go part time. how do you get in the door in this situation?

ecodesignfive,

Although I’m an Industrial Designer by trade I haven’t worked in product design since school. My freelance and day job work mostly center around web design, development, and database management. I generally list myself as an Industrial Designer somewhere in the body of the posting because as you said there is no ID designation. In fact a lot of sites don’t even list “designer” as an occupation so sometimes you have to be creative and put yourself in the next closest field category.

I generally list web related things on my postings which are more relavant on sites like Dice, Career Builder, etc.

It could simply be the fact that you’re not as good as you think. I’ve hired people who are straight out of school but have top talent. Its all about talent. The ‘3’ years experience is just a guide.

Send your resume and then call the firm. A phone call after 10/15 days is always useful. Sometimes is frustating. Secretarys usually says: " we receive many CVs…" or “sorry I can’t find your CV…”. Try to get the name of the boss and send your material to his/her e-mail.

If you are looking to find job in your town or area go directly to the firm and give it to the right person (if you who is). After that make a call!

You don’t have to think “I disturb, they are working…” They tell you if you disturb.

F.