help me build my home made wakeboard!

Just for the fun, I want to start a little project, building a home made wakeboard with alternative materials…
Boards are normally made with a Divinycell (foam) and carbon fiber, to make them both strong and light…

Now, some people make their board with marine plywood, and give it a good layer of varnish to finish…and that seems to work well, although it’s a bit heavier…

I would like to try using several layers (maybe 10) of 2mm Sintra (a kind of PVC foam material) glued together…Using a layered assembly method should increase stiffness a bit, but I don’t know if it would be enough. It doesn’t need to be AS stiff as carbon fiber…
I thought I could maybe add (somewhere between the sintra layers) some fiber glass pultruded rod, to increase it’s rigidity…

What do you think? Have any other material suggestion?
Think this could work?

Other alternatives that I am considering are:

  • A flat pultruded profile…maybe a rectangle with some vertical ribs for increased stiffness…but I think this could be too brittle, and maybe too heavy too…
  • one last option would be to use double wall, corrugated plastic…maybe filled with urethane foam?..

thanks for sharing your views with me

Cheers

Gerry

Save the pultruded rods.

Can you say, monocoque? Monocoque - Wikipedia

If you really want to push material limits, why not consider using kraft paper, or newsprint, laminated with aliphatic resin; two halves bonded together, and a hollow interior with a few corrugated cardboard bulkheads between the exterior skins. You can splash the molds you’d need off of an old board.

You can buy an ''end roll" of newsprint from most local newspapers; it’s what’s left when the roll gets down to the point where the pressman changes to the next roll before it runs completely out. There are usually a couple hundred feet or more on a roll, and the cost is next to nothing ($5). Kraft paper you’ll spend a little more on. Titebond you can get by the gallon, and dilute it with water if you need to thin it out a bit. Think Papier-mâchétechnology; it worked for disposable aircraft drop tanks during WWII.