got my first job.......now what????

i graduated as experimental designer last may, and wanted to go into product design. so it took me a couple of months but i started working 3 wks ago. its good and all, im brainstorming, callin, designin, etc. but i feel thers still something missing.

  1. thers no room for promotion.
  2. little pay = long hrs
  3. theres more to product design to learn they dont offer.
    (we make things for bags, but i want something like electronic or toy design.)

what should i do? or
what did u do to get ur second better job???

Start looking for the next opportunity.

I know what I have to offer as a designer - as soon as I get the “We don’t have money for raises” speech, my resumes start going out.

I’m on my 3rd job - I probably make more than I would have by staying at the same place for 6 years and holding out for deserved raises.

Employers show no loyalty to employees anymore and will lay you off in a heartbeat if it helps the bottom line. There is no reason that you should show any kind of commitment to them either if they take advantage of you.

Decide what your mid/long term career goals are and if your current job isn’t helping you get there, move on.

It should also be noted that “job hopping” doesn’t look good on your resume either. You should at minimum stay at each job a year or two.

I would put the minimum at 6 months, especially for the first 2-3 years out of school. There’s nothing wrong with changing jobs as you’re figuring out your career path (trying different specialties in the field, or trying large and small firms). It’s not wrong to admit to a potential employer that you spent some time exploring your options. Of course, by the time you qualify for a mid-level position, you need to have a clear sense of your focus, so you’ll obviously tend to stay in one position for a longer time, at least a year.

[quote=“ahs”]i graduated as experimental designer last may,quote]

EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNER?!?!?!?!??!?!!?!!!?!???

I am having the excact same problem.
my boss is a total asshole.
I work from 8am-10pm and he is still asking for more.
I even have to come in on hoildays and weekends. No appreciation or over-time.
the pay is low and we requires 2 months in advance notice for hoildays. We cant combine vacations with paid hoildays, and I still having a hard time getting my thanksgiving off that I requested 3 months ago…

what kills me is not all of the above, He is not a designer ( or a really bad one), and he doesn’t know how to appreciates design, but he thinks he knows so much and he take charge and make design decisions.

Because I want to look good in my resume, should I stay at least one year?
doesn’t 6 months sounds a little too fast? (I’ve been working for almost 6 months, I can hold for a few more months, but this is really killing me…)

I was in a situation like that early in my career and stayed way too long - the worst part is that other places I interviewed at afterwards really didn’t even like the work I was asked to do there. Some even held it against me!

I stayed because I was beating the bushes for a job, and nothing popped up immediately, plus I was making a paycheck, was an ID guy at a company and it made me feel legitimate. If I could go back, I think I would have stayed long enough to see how that part of the design world worked, 6 months to a year maybe, then leave new job awaiting or not.

Without a position set up, going back to school to be around other designers, do a custom semester on a personal passion, or polish skills which are lacking would have all been wise options in hindsight. Or maybe just moving to a city with more design opportunities to knock no enough doors enough times to get a foot in somewhere.

who knows where the the road untraveled will lead; you’ll figure it out!

Its a tough call for some jobs. I recently left mine to pursue other things so I know.

I would give it at least 6 months, if after that point you don’t feel like you are learning anything useful, the work conditions suck, the pay would be better waiting tables, etc, Leave.

If people question why you only worked their for 6 months, tell them that you approached the job as a contract employee. Your 6 months were up and decided to take on different projects, end of story.