DeWalt drill for "Hispanic pros with smaller hands"

This might be normal speak for some in product research and design. :astonished:

The article didn’t answer the question I have, which is how hand sizes vary among construction workers. I would like know where the statement come from, I just don’t believe someone would say that without some back story.

Wow. Outrage? First of all why would having small hands be a negative?
If anything, it sounds like he knows his market. He didn’t say it in a derogatory way but implying that it would be appealing to the hispanic market (& makita users)
We use both 18v and 12v and the 12v are very handy to use specially because of their size & weight.

Oh well, another “outrage” story.

FH: That’s why I want to know where this came from! Anecdotally, I feel like most of the Hispanic contractors that I saw in Phoenix were my height or shorter. I have smaller hands, so they probably did too. Was that a universal human factor and does it still persist today?

I’m surprised that no one has tried to explain this, instead of immediately apologizing.

Also, the guy was not from DeWalt right? The post topic title makes it sound like this came from a DeWalt employee…

Not from Dewalt, the guy is a Lowe’s executive. But just as the DeWalt guys the Lowes executive also knows his customer/market…maybe even a little better than the DeWalt designer. He probably mentioned Hispanic Professionals because that is probably a huge percentage of their customers.

I don’t have hard numbers but yes, typically the Hispanic male is smaller. You can definitely tell just by watching international soccer games. It’s pretty funny seeing Mexico play against Germany and how they try to keep the ball on the ground as much as possible (no chance with air balls). There are parts in southern Mexico and Central America where males would probably range from 5’5" to 5’10". I wonder if people would be outraged if Adidas said they designed M and L shirts for the national team?

I don’t even know why the outrage but what I have seen recently is that if you are a high profile person you need to apologize no matter what. I think trying to explain his reasoning with data would probably fuel the fire more and bring more negative attention to Lowes; that’s how social media works now.

Just found this link:[url]Not from Dewalt, the guy is a Lowe’s executive. But just as the DeWalt guys the Lowes executive also knows his customer/market…maybe even a little better than the DeWalt designer. He probably mentioned Hispanic Professionals because that is probably a huge percentage of their customers.

I don’t have hard numbers but yes, typically the Hispanic male is smaller. You can definitely tell just by watching international soccer games. It’s pretty funny seeing Mexico play against Germany and how they try to keep the ball on the ground as much as possible (no chance with air balls). There are parts in southern Mexico and Central America where males would probably range from 5’5" to 5’8". I wonder if people would be outraged if Adidas said they designed M and L shirts for the national team?

I don’t even know why the outrage but what I have seen recently is that if you are a high profile person you need to apologize no matter what. I think trying to explain his reasoning with data would probably fuel the fire more and bring more negative attention to Lowes; that’s how social media works now.

Just found this link How tall is the average Mexican? | Geo-Mexico, the geography of Mexico, they show a picture of the Mexican soccer team, I guess my common sense and educated guesses are pretty dialed in.

I need that drill.

It’s funny how the opposite would be considered perfectly appropriate - ”Oversized drill for the American market”. Which by same logic should be even more offensive, given it has nothing to do with anthropometrics.

I have seen that posted in an offensive way and it gets almost zero outrage! How many times have we seen the article about making movie theater seats wider for Americans? It is weird what we get riled up about…

Then again, as designers, we should have a far great appreciation for human factors than the average person.

Yeap.
-Designing 17" or 18" wide aircraft seats…“how are you going to fit the 300lb (insert American region here) on those seats?”
-Or how about the typical 5’ female nurse when designing medical equipment. I often find myself questioning if I should say 5’ individual.
-Or designing medical wearable devices. Same stereotypes apply except that they are backed up by doctor and nurse feedback. "Make them longer or shorter to fit x population.

Sadly I don’t think it should take an expert to understand that his point was not negative or degrading to the Hispanic population.

The stereotype is small hands = small dick = less masculine. It is a part of the vernacular as an insult and even the president gets upset about the claim he has small hands.

Does ignorance of an insult make it OK?

Yes.

It’s not an insult if you are talking about hand size and ergonomics in a business sense.
Mentioning the president’s small hands without any other context is strictly meant as an insult referencing his manly-hood. Rubio ended up apologizing for those comments later on.
Speaking of social media and apologies, I think the President is the only high profile person that can get away with saying questionable remarks and not have to go on an apology tour like most other people/celebrities.

Correct. But the statement in question was not said in an overly technical/business manner. Not as insulting as Rubio’s statement, but it certainly could have been better phrased.

Seems to me he apologized for that and it’s all good in my book. But nothing sells like controversy so most of “news” is clickbait at best.

As someone who’s designed tools for 20 some years all you can say to that particular comment is “Well, that was unfortunate”, but the fact is he’s spot-on, a majority of Latino tool users do in fact have, on average, smaller hands and shorter fingers, creating challenges for grip strength (as do other certain groups, nationalities, etc). At SB&D we researched and compiled ergonomic data (and I still do) just like I’m sure many other design groups do. Similarly, it’s always been a well known fact that women (on average) have smaller hands than men - and some products designed for women have features to highlight that but these days it’s not wise to shout that!

All he had to say was that the tool is a better design than previous offerings, with a smaller girth handle to better accommodate more users.

Here in Taiwan, DeWalt specifically mentioned that certain models of power drills are designed for “Asian smaller hands”, which I really think is 100% marketing mishap. I don’t think they actually made a different tooling for a “smaller” handle.

You’re correct, they didn’t make a separate housing just for smaller hands. I’ve noticed in the last five years that Makita, Hitachi and DeWalt/SBD have moved to very small girth handles, the first two make sense as their home markets are Japan and elsewhere in the AMEAA, but DeWalt has a strong global reach so I’d bet they’re shooting for a single size sweet spot (they tend to have the triggers as two finger that don’t pull in flush, effectively making the handle a bigger girth for the fore and middle fingers - while the third and pinky are able to grip tighter into the smaller girth below.

I haven’t noticed Bosch, Rigid/Ryobi/Milwaukee moving so extremely in that direction yet.

so, seems like a global trend with executives and brands having poor language around it. Why not say “we did research and it turned out that more of our users had smaller grip spans (nice way of saying smaller hands) than we thought (or say we did research and realized our grips were uncomfortably sized)…We resized all of our handles to work better globally and the new result is better for everyone.”

The proper ergo research, the observational field research and the database of user comments (I explain them to my clients as wants, needs and frustrations) was never prioritized, highlighted or used as marketing push while I was at SBD - sounds like things haven’t changed.

I interned at DeWalt more than 10 years ago and my direct supervisor was the guy in charge of ergonomics ( I think he still is now) and I will say that DeWalt’s handle design (feel, grip profile) hasn’t changed too much since back then. It has always felt more or less the same. I did an ergonomic research exercise when I was there (more like an assignment given to me to familiarize with related products) and studied ergonomic features on various powertool brands, and every company has their own very different take on how a handle should feel. For an example, Bosch’s tool handles tend to be really bulky. It gave a sense of “substance” and firmness when trying to hold on to it. On the other hand, DeWalt tries to reduce the distance between the thumb and your index finger for better control. It comes down to different philosophies and preference. I’m still a DeWalt fan, just very weird to see such superficial sales pitch coming from a company that I understood to be extremely specific about how they communicate their brand to consumers.

Ps. I’m the same guy you quoted, I just found my ancient account back.

Wow, good to see that M-cow avatar back after so long away!