Democratizing design at P&G

We all saw this coming: our role as designers is changing.

http://www.businessweek.com/innovate/content/jul2008/id20080728_623527.htm

Related story in the WSJ today,

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB122608904288009265.html

they’re both great examples (I hate buzzwords) of design thinking.

The trick to real innovation is asking the right questions, and the trick to asking the right questions is not knowing what they are before-hand.
Not an easy thing to do.

“The trick to real innovation is asking the right questions, and the trick to asking the right questions is not knowing what they are before-hand.
Not an easy thing to do.”


I think the trick is to ask the right questions to trigger other questions that gets you the interesting pertinent info. we are trying to get. Trying to engage the questioned into understanding what we are asking is very difficult sometimes. Just starting a dialog and not constantly questioning is also a good approach

A. P&G about flippin time!
B. The only reason its happening is because they’ve realised that it increases revenue by increasing brand loyalty – Its just a way of making more money, if it wasn’t, they wouldn’t be doing it (and there’s nothing wrong with that).
C. In an increasingly sceptical and savvy market, marketeers are finding it harder to market products without involving customers – people realise that just because its celebrity endorsed, it won’t make them look or perform like that celebrity, therefore involving customers at a grass roots level becomes another marketing tool. Why do I get the feeling this is more about good PR.
D. It doesn’t change the role of the designer, it just empowers everyone else to be more like a designer (at least at the brain storming stage).
E.
“The trick to real innovation is asking the right questions, and the trick to asking the right questions is not knowing what they are before-hand. Not an easy thing to do.” Coledf

‘The real trick for P&G is convincing the consumer that they’re asking the right questions and making them believe that they’re really listening to their answers.’

F. Yeah, I’m a glass half empty kind of person.

My biggest takeaway is that they’re teaching “design thinking” to the masses.

Are non-professionals successful with these tools?What will this mean for the designers at P&G? Are they more or less valued by their peers, who now employ their tools? Are they destined for decentralization? Will quality or success rise or fall?