Confusing Graduate school e-mail? Accepted? or not?

The school is great, everyone is very very nice and treats you with respect and if you are a fellow designer not as if you are just some rookie applying for school there. The group of people you work with is very important hense it being a small school, and since they only accept in 8 graduates a year they have to(and you have to) make sure its a good fit for you. So the interviews last for 1/2 hour each you meet 8 seperate times with 2 of the current students each time. Then you get to talk to the department head. It went great … and i did hear back from them, an exciting e-mail saying i was excepted telling me to keep my eyes open for an “official letter of acceptance.” I have to say i really love the sense of community there, it seems to be able to foster possitive growth in my knowledge of 3-d design. And on top of that not everyone is a Industrial designer, some are sculpture majors, some architects, from all back grounds. But you really have to prove to them that you know what you want from grad school and that you are passionate and dedicated to making it work! Its a serious school, that’s the feel i got of it. And they REALLY care about the students.

congrats!!! maybe there is hope fr me!

that is really great … one of 8 to get in … quite impressive

why is it a good graduate school in 3d?

St., this isn’t exactly an answer to your question, but some xamples of current student work which you may or may not find interesting:

http://www.caidonline.org/holysit/

Or you can link on to the Cranbrook 3d website to find the work for the 3d program.
http://www.cranbrook.edu/art/3d/

now i have been accepted into University of Cincinnati’s masters of architecture program without taking the required GRE…

Too much to take in. This school was a long shoot for me

so whos going to cranbrook???

i’m curious…did anybody NOT accept their acceptance at Cranbrook? or is anybody there NOT happy? it seems that everybody that has visited the school loves the place.

i accepted …and yes i love it … but yes i am scared … and yes i dislike the detroit area … and yes i am excited to attend … but as we all know these steps are hard to make

arrangementbycolor, did you consider RISD? i am curious about how you would compare these two schools.

I’m curious as to why, on both of those questions. Scared of what? And what’s so bad about Detroit? It’s not like you’re really moving there; it’s just a couple of years, and won’t you just spend them in the studio?

Yes i did concider RISD, and I did apply not only there, but also into University of Cincinnati’s Architecture program. I got accepted into UC’s program, but not into RISD… ?? not sure why, but I guess it was because I was not suited for their program.

As far as the being scared, it’s a big step in my life, and I have somethings that make that decision a hard one (more personal life things that have nothing to do with school) there are finacial concerns, and moving by myself with little support doing it, along with life changes in personal relationships that have made things a little hard on me and this decision. Detriot is not exactally the place i want to be, so that is a little hard for me also. I understand its 2 years, and I know i will be spending a lot of time in the studio, but I am still a little scared. I think that is understandable.


So, also to point out that I am also very excited to go to school there and I see it as being a great opportunity, but at the same time i have other things that go on in my life at the current time.

arrangementbycolor,

why do you think that you were not suited for RISD’s program? aside from the intangible feeling of the schools, these programs seem very similar to me. as far as i understand, RISD does have some sort of curriculum however it seems very loose and not very substantial as far as curriculums go.

i’m trying to understand the differences between these programs. what did you learn after researching schools? i’ve been having difficulties figuring it out.

regardless, congrats on cranbrook - even if i don’t understand the subtleties of these programs - i know that your getting into cranbrook is a great thing!!!

Arrangementbycolor, not only are your feelings understandable, but they show how serious of a step this is for you. One of the crucial characteristics of Cranbrook has always been getting people out of their environment and into its own relative vacuum. When the school was founded, it was literally on a farm in the middle of nowhere. You may have heard the comparison between Cranbrook and a monastery. It’s all too true, and it’s what makes it unique.

Of course, the school is now within a ridiculous suburban bedroom community, and that’s probably not your thing (if it’s any consolation, it’s no student’s thing).

For what it’s worth, Detroit is an interesting city in its own right. If you manage to get past the generalization of Detroit as a ghetto, you can really learn a lot from experiencing the city firsthand. Its low cost of living has enabled some alumni to stick around and work on interesting community-based initiatives, for instance. The area is very ethnically diverse. For example, there’s a robust Middle Eastern contingent, which is something you probably wouldn’t experience elsewhere. There’s a vibrant music and art scene as well. Even the suburban communities offer things you’d be into; you’ll just have to do some exploring.

All of your classmates will feel just as uprooted and disoriented as you. Some will have just arrived in the US from various parts of the world. It’ll help you all form strong bonds when you first get there, and it will enable you to take stock of who you are as a person and as a designer. It’ll be an immensely difficult experience, but I’m sure one you’ll come to value and appreciate. Good luck.

So pardon me if I get it wrong as I am new to these forums, but what I gather from reading your postings is that Cranbrook does an interview-type day for the top howevermany, say 15 students, that they might want to accept? And then… what?

I really regret not having the time to go visit and set up some sort of informal interview, but twas not to be at the time

my reason for asking is that I had applied to Cran for fall 2005 and didn’t hear a peep for ageeeeesssssss and then got a letter stating that I’m on the waiting list in late April. I had simply applied because the philosophy and the student work really appealed to me, I had no clue about how the go about deciding.

So, does this mean there’s a 2nd choice list of people they had interviewed, then a sub-waiting list? which is where, I suppose, I wound up?

ideas, anyone?

So pardon me if I get it wrong as I am new to these forums, but what I gather from reading your postings is that Cranbrook does an interview-type day for the top howevermany, say 15 students, that they might want to accept? And then… what?

I really regret not having the time to go visit and set up some sort of informal interview, but twas not to be at the time

my reason for asking is that I had applied to Cran for fall 2005 and didn’t hear a peep for ageeeeesssssss and then got a letter stating that I’m on the waiting list in late April. I had simply applied because the philosophy and the student work really appealed to me, I had no clue about how the go about deciding.

So, does this mean there’s a 2nd choice list of people they had interviewed, then a sub-waiting list? which is where, I suppose, I wound up?

ideas, anyone?

As far as I know, you’re correct that about twice as many candidates as will be accepted are invited for the formal on-campus interview. Maybe that’s 15 people. I don’t know. So, since you were not invited and got your letter relatively late, chances of you being admitted are probably quite slim. But, if you are still interested, you may as well call the school and see where you stand, and also stress that you’d still love the opportunity to attend. If you were admitted at this late date, I wonder if you’d qualify for financial aid.

So, when the school requests an in-person interview, do they pay for your travel? Is it normal for schools to do this? I thought visits were entirely voluntary, if you wanted to check the place out in person.

Anyway, thanks for your comments, everyone. I’ve been reading this forum with interest, since I’m thinking about applying this winter.

Crancurious, I think you’re talking about two different things. First, as someone who’s interested, or as an actual applicant, you can visit any school, take a tour, and usually set up an interview with someone. That’s all to give you more information and to answer any questions. Some schools also have special days for this, with info sessions set up for prospective students.

Second, some schools (and Cranbrook is one of them) have interviews as a final part of the evaluation process. So, you can obviously still ask questions and get a feel for the place, but you’re also being judged as a candidate. I think it’s a bit more like a portfolio review.

As far as I know, Cranbrook doesn’t help defray costs of travel, and the interview isn’t actually required (though you’re supposed to go, as it proves that you’re serious and gives you a chance to show off in person). I don’t know what happens to candidates from abroad.

Friends of mine in other fields, like the sciences, have been flown out for these sorts of interviews, but I don’t think art schools do that.