Co-worker taking credit??

Okay I don’t want to come off as a whiner but I have a bit of a problem here a work and was wondering if any of you have had the same situation and how you deal with it. We recently (about a year ago) hired a person with a degree in ID and a background in marketing and project management, to do some project management work for us. They were told coming in that they would do some ID work as well but the main part of their job would be project management. Because of this they were hired at a level higher than me because they had more corporate experience and the the job was posted at a hire level. (not ID experience) Well for the past year they have done very little ID and they started to complain to upper management about this. Because of this they been put on projects with me which is fine being that two heads are better than one.

The problem that I am having is that this person is starting to take credit for my work. Telling people that the designs are all theirs and even the bosses in meeting that we are both attending. Now I know as professionals we should no longer get upset over who’s design is who’s because when it comes down to it, its the team’s, but I feel this is starting to make me look bad. Also things have really started to pick up for me here and this I feel may bring me down. I also feel that because they are a higher level than me people automatically assume that they have more experience so there for make better design decisions. This is not the case. Given that I have more design experience (more than four years on this person) I am constantly having to correct mistakes and comments in meetings.

I want to say something to my boss about this but don’t want to come off as a whiner and just being difficult. I am sure some of you seasoned veterans out there have dealt with this and probably some of you younger folks as well. What do I do and how do I deal with this in the most politically correct way and not stir the pot too much? Thanks for the help.

easy answer… Less talk, more doing. Let the results speak for themselves.

If you have faith that the people you report to are intelligent enough to make evaluations about who is working well and what the results are, you’ll get the farthest ahead. Just keep working away, do your best and don’t worry about the other guy. If you are as good as you say, it will show. If he really doesn’t know what he’d doing, it will show, or he’ll make a mistake, or take credit for something that bombs and then be in an awkward position.

I know it kinda sounds like I’m just saying to leave it to karma, but really, worrying about anyone other than yourself is never productive. Do the best you can, play nice and it will all work out sooner or later.

R

i worked a lot with other people, and in school i’ve always been told to say “the team has worked on this…” , so when someone speaks for himself i usually corrects them, even if hey are my bosses, so if that person up to you in the scale cannot understand the meaning of a teaam i think you could talk to him about it. Also it’s pretty mature from you to tell the other person what is bothering you.






ps: sorry for my english if its wrong, im a spanish speaker

Benja and Richard both have good points. If you think this guy is really after the glory though, start to design yourself a solution. If they are taking sketches of yours to the big boss, make sure everything that you do has your name on it really big in the corner. If they are presenting stuff in meetings, maybe save your best work for the meeting and say, “oh yeah, I just had this idea yesterday and didn’t have time to run it by the guy screwing you”. That way, they think the ok ideas are his and your new ideas are completely without his input.

Basically, treat this as a communication design problem. You need to communicate what you are bringing to the game.

Another thing you could do is suggest they give a project to this other person alone because you are so busy. Then, act really busy all the time so they have to do the work themselves. Then the management will understand why the other projects turned out so well.

If they are taking sketches of yours to the big boss, make sure everything that you do has your name on it really big in the corner. If they are presenting stuff in meetings, maybe save your best work for the meeting and say, “oh yeah, I just had this idea yesterday and didn’t have time to run it by the guy screwing you”. That way, they think the ok ideas are his and your new ideas are completely without his input.

I kinda feel that this will make you out to look just as bad as the guy taking credit and is a bit of a cheap way to go about it.

Could you not try talking to the guy? Just say how you feel and emphasize more of a team/partnership between you two? Or even just correcting him each time he say’s ‘I’ and the work is yours.

If not, then like Richard said just keep at it and the people that matter will notice. Must be frustrating though, dunno how you can keep quiet about the whole thing!

i usually give out just enough rope to let someone hang themself. it’s not misinformation, but just enough info that the person claiming credit will extrapolate incorrectly, then i have to clear the confusion and the questions in a meeting.

Thanks guys this has been helpful. Mostly I just need to vent this morning but I do like the feedback I have recieved.

R, I agree with what you said and have been busting my ass lately and I think come January and reveiw time that will show. I have been doing a bit of observation today and I don’t think I am the only one to notice this. Tis makes me feel a bit better knowing that this person is just making a fool of themselves.

The only thing that I struggle with is that people in the Pkg group notice it but Marketing and the other don’t. I don’t really know if this should bother me or if I should just let it go.

i was/am going through this, too. i wasn’t certain my efforts and expertise were being recognised. interesting thing happened: we had layoffs recently. i discreetly debriefed a former coworker who was in the know (HR) and was assured that not only was i in the conscience of the top execs, but my job security was particularly iron-clad.