Career change....thinking about art center. Need advice

I know this has been posted before…but, would like specific advice on my situation. I am a packaging engineer and am getting sick of my job and want a career change. I’m making about $70K currently but, don’t want to be stuck doing this all my life. I am 28 and am getting older and want to get into ID. I’m considering Art Center because of my current location in LA. Tuition is $15,500 per term. I want to do this as fast as I can. Apparently it can be done in 2.66 years. I talked to a couselor and he told me from my sketching that I definitely have the skills I just need 4 pieces of work. I have 1 have 1 piece of work

Questions are:
What are the major disadvantages/advantages with getting another BA at an age of 28? Has anyone completed art center 2years and 8 months? Is this gonna be intense?
I’m concerned with how much this will set me back financially? I don’t have much savings. Haven’t looked into scholarships. Any advice?
Will any of my previous bachelors classes transfer if I took standard engineering courses?

Thanks

Art Center is super intense, especially if you do the terms back to back like that, from what I’m told… but you are getting what you pay for! A rigorous education.

If you are quitting this job, be sure that you give that job for me, or any other student who is due to graduate from Ireland and the UK. I’m not kidding. Please do that. :smiley:

I’ve got one year left to finish my degree, and I’m getting further and further in debt. I’m stuck in Ireland, it’s too bloody expensive in here. Packaging engineer sounds great compared to all the other jobs that I have done before.

I mean, I appreciate that you are moving up in career/life, etc. Art Center is fantastic education, etc - do it if you have the opportunity. However, don’t forget to hand over your job to someone else, its a struggle to get them. :wink:

If you are quitting this job, be sure that you give that job for me, or any other student who is due to graduate from Ireland and the UK. I’m not kidding. Please do that.

These are not ID jobs, but degree specific jobs for people with Packaging Science degrees. The specify materials, compression strengths, write specs, etc… No sketching, renderings, etc…

Newjak,

As a Packaging Engineer you are well on you way to being and industrial designer in the packaging and POP industry. I am guessing you have a Packaging Science degree from MSU, RIT, or Clemson. These schools teach you basic engineering and material knowledge, but what I have found from working with Packaging Engineers (I work in a team of 16 of them) is they have very little concept of design process and generally jump at one off concepts without exploring. This is where an ID degree will help you. You also have to remember thought that you will do very few packaging projects in ID school. Most of your projects will be consumer products.

To your question of will it be intense?..I think no mater what school you go to it will be intense especially the Art Center. Do you plan to work and go to school at the same time? If so this may not work. I have seen people have full time jobs and try to go to ID school and they just were not able to devote the time to get everything they could out of the education. I would also ask, do you have any creative background? You are going to need basic creative skills to get into Art Center and to get it done in that short of a time you don’t really have time to learn how to sketch. Let’s see some of you work!!

While I don’t think these programs compare to Art Center’s in terms of intensity, and you would have to move to do them, you might be interested:

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN CERTIFICATE AT MASS ART
http://www.massart.edu/x373.xml

The industrial design certificate is a program of 51 credits for students who hold a prior baccalaureate degree but now wish to enter the industrial design profession. The program takes three years part-time; some of the courses can be taken through professional and continuing education at night, some will be scheduled in the daytime degree program. Certificate students may transfer or waive up to 9 credits based on portfolio review. Students with no portfolio may take continuing education courses in order to prepare a portfolio.

FIT in NYC has a Package Design BFA that would only take two years to complete if you already have a BFA or BA and tuition is reasonable even for out of state. $6302 per term.
http://www.fitnyc.edu/2634.asp

Another idea is to take classes at Art Center at night until you build up a portfolio and then go to grad school. Did you read the thread about the free grad programs in Europe?

As a Packaging Engineer you are well on you way to being and industrial designer in the packaging and POP industry. I am guessing you have a Packaging Science degree from MSU, RIT, or Clemson. These schools teach you basic engineering and material knowledge, but what I have found from working with Packaging Engineers (I work in a team of 16 of them) is they have very little concept of design process and generally jump at one off concepts without exploring. This is where an ID degree will help you. You also have to remember thought that you will do very few packaging projects in ID school. Most of your projects will be consumer products.

Yeah, I work for Johnson & Johnson Neutrogena and I have to agree with you that nobody does any research on packaging options mainly due to short timelines. We lack a dedicated innovation team and us engineers are overworked and under resourced focusing most of our time on qualification. Little time to brainstorm. We settle on your basic tube or stock bottle. The job is more project management than engineering.