Can SolidWorks do this?

I have to totally disagree with you…

At almost every design office I have visited…whether it be consulting or corporate…Solidworks has been a major tool of the designers.

I realize its all part of being a CAD bitch to re-create a model a designer has given to them…but why waste that time when a model can be handed over already in a native format…

While I do feel it may lack just a tad of surface control…with each version it does get better. I do admit that Photoworks blows at times…but once in a while you can achieve a decent effect.

with all due respect, I entirely disagree. i know this is getting off topic, but any software you get proficient in will enable you to express yourself on various levels, beyond even the intentions of the software developers. we use solidworks as a concept sketching tool, because it is easy to pick up, and easy to generate decent visuals to get ideas across. the design process needs to be supported by the right tools, the right creative minds to talk to specific audiences. if that means you completely abuse solidworks in the process, well, so be it. what works for one situation, might not work in another, so don’t be so quick at making generalistic statements.

“Solidworks is for engineers, not designers. End of story. Companies that force their ID’ers to work in Solidworks right off the bad are short changing the design process IMO.” quote from above…

I also completely disagree.

My office runs SW as our primary tool for 3D Cad. All of our designers run it. A good designer should not touch a 3D cad program until the design direction is established. If you are using a CAD program to do your design work, then you are letting your knowledge of the software steer your design. Not a good idea IMO.

“Design” work should be done on paper ( or digital ) and/or through hand forms before the 3D program.

As mentioned above, SW is a “reality” based program. It is dimension driven and part/assemby based. Just like real products. The faster you get your design to this stage, the better prepared your are for production. Oh yeah, ID is design for mass production. That is the delivery method to get all of our user centered research, cool designs, good ergonomics, trend aware colors, cool materials, market aware segments and all out cool products to the end user. The more “manufacturing” ready and aware an ID person is, the bestter succes they will have getting their innovative products to market.

Saying that Solidwork is for engineers is like saying Alias is for “fine artists”. A good ID person wears many hats, one of which is that of an Engineer.

Saying that Solidwork is for engineers is like saying Alias is for “fine artists”. A good ID person wears many hats, one of which is that of an Engineer.

Yes, a good designer wears many hats, but he should wear them equally. My opinion is that employers who require designers to know and use Solidworks are only out to save money by using designers as engineers, Let designers do their job with the tools bet fit for that purpose. Solidworks is not one of them for me.

[quote=“nydesignguy”][quote]
Saying that Solidwork is for engineers is like saying Alias is for “fine artists”. A good ID person wears many hats, one of which is that of an Engineer.[/quote]

Yes, a good designer wears many hats, but he should wear them equally. My opinion is that employers who require designers to know and use Solidworks are only out to save money by using designers as engineers, Let designers do their job with the tools bet fit for that purpose. Solidworks is not one of them for me.[/quote]

Yes, A good designer wears many hats. Engineering is one of the most critical. The more “blue sky” your idea ( do not read that as non inovative ), the more disconnect you will have with engineering. The more real world manufacturing based your designs are, the better your communication/relationship with engineers will be.

Just like marketing, sales and business people, engineers will not change how they work. We must adapt our approach to each of these fields. ID is the glue that binds a product and we are in the middle of all these people. As you mentioned, we must work to get our ideas through each of them.

As a professional and part time educator, I use and teach Solidworks. One of the biggest complaints I here from professionals is that students are not well versed enough in the manufacturing process. That tells me that schools are not teaching how to wear the engineer hat enough.

Whatever the tool you use, we live in the mass production world. If you choose to use Alias, Rhino or whatever, that it cool. That is great. If SW is not for you, fine. It is a powerfull tool that Designer can use to become closer, not farther apart. The closer we are, the better the end product will be.

:smiley:

Solidworks is an engineering tool. However, it is misinformed to say that parametric programs are not ID tools. Solidworks has made great advances in the last few years to reach out to ID. It has tools that are on par with Alias and Rhino. This is probably why Alias is trying to differentiate itself by heavily promoting Studio sketch capabilities. Companies that implement Solidworks or ProE are not stupid. These prorams have the surfacing capabilities comparable to Rhino and alias. Plus they have the parametric capabilities that make RP fast. Sounds to me like someone who has not tried to use Solidworks. I have used Rhino, Alias and Solidworks for ID. It used to be that there WAS a palpable difference between the three programs. But the parametrics like proE, Solidworks and UG, have made significant progress in making the UI easy to use, and the surfacing toolboxes powerful. I have not seen the countering move from ID progs to create even so much as a Shell/Wall Thickness feature.
Rhino is only now moving into limited design history and Alias seems to be focusing development further upstream in the design process than down stream.
But how many designers sketch in Alias? Not a lot from what I have spoken with Alias reps. So if you are using CAD to create models from a more defined concept, rather than sketching in CAD then parametric programs that have good surfacing capabilites seem like a smart choice.

Simple Solidworks Surfacing Tutorial

Not the best renderer by any means but still very capable

I just tried helping out an engineer with some work in Solidworks. How can you call this program a decent Engineering/ID tool if it doesn’t even do a basic thing like offseting an ellipse? Rhino and AutoCAD do that with no problems whatsoever.

OUCH…and he went right for the achilles heel…

??

Every program has its glitches

Solidworks, Pro/Engineer, UG, and Alias used in conjunction with any of the other 3 are the best softwares on the market for Product Development )Not nessisaraly POP/Display) hands down. Anyone who argues the difference is simply blind to the shifts tword these programs.

Face it, the development cycle is being cut shorter and shorter. By allowing all development work to be completed from concepts through production utilizing one native software format is the only way to keep up with this reduceing time frame. I use both Pro/E Wildfire 2 and Solidworks 2005, each are very capable programs when it comes to advanced surfacing. Give them 2-3 more iterations and they will be on par with Alias’s capabilities. Have even heard rummer that Alias and Pro might work out a compatibility scheme were native formats could be transfered directly.

By utilizing Pro/Concept and WildFire 2 we have cut our average concept to testing funtional prototypes times from 9-12 months to 6 months tops for most programs. This is for complex projects such as medical and fitness equipment. For the simpler consumer products it is generally down to 3-4 months now, and 6 months we have production peices on their way from plants in china. All with out the files ever leaving the native Pro/E format.

Pro, SW, UG, they are tools, for ID as well as eng. The sooner you come to realize this and learn to master the tools you will see thier value in the process. However using these powerfull tools before you have your directions, and concepts formalized is always detrimental.

Think on paper, finalize on screen

talk Solidworks and everyone comes out of the woodwork. you guys voted over on the Project thread? head over already.

leave the poor ellipse alone

[img]

This is a PW SW rendering. All decals were put in using PW, so we could do renderings in many positions. No rework in PS.[/img]

nice render. Do you have screen shots of the lighting setup and settings?

Not with me for that one. That image is native SW and native render with no touch up.

The most important thing to rendering is to light it like you would in a studio. If you can light a product for a picture, you can light a render.

i think this’s the main issue with most people using solidworks+ photoworks. they like everything to be readymade. the photoworks default scene setups are just for quick rendering. each object you design requires a unique lighting setup.

also you need to adjust the settings in the manager dialog box.

(nydesignguy) “I just tried helping out an engineer with some work in Solidworks. How can you call this program a decent Engineering/ID tool if it doesn’t even do a basic thing like offseting an ellipse? Rhino and AutoCAD do that with no problems whatsoever.”

Keep Learning

There are many ways to do the same thing in solidworks. It may be frustrating that you can’t offset some things in the same sketch, but this is there to keep the simple people from screwing the pooch. Everything built in solidworks should have one or two master sketches from which all the features relate. So in this case you should be offseting from an ellipse, line, or circle which is in the master sketch, not creating gaps in you feature relations.

Solidworks is not just for engineers, it’s an amayzing tool for a manufacturing-aware designer, which we should all be right??

Also, I can’t imagine using a prgram that doesn’t have a history manager (Alias). At our office, things are slightly changing all of the time, and it’s easy, change a few dimensions and prey you didn’t screw up the day before and “surprise” the part/assembly is fixed.

From my limited experience with “The Alias” you would have to start over, rebuild the whole damn thing. Oh wait i guess you wouldn’t be making dimensional changes there anyways. Someone please inlighten me on how they make adjustments to their alias models, unless all alias users are perfect, a supreme race that gets things right the first time everytime.

not necessary to get it right every time. doesnt work that way. with more experience you might see the advantage of using Alias for some tasks. i’m a pro/e user so cant comment on SW. but last i heard SW wasnt too good at organic shapes. real organics. not the stuff pro and SW sell as organic. i like pro/e surfacing. but even Wildfire with Style surfacing doesnt compare to Alias for speed and simplicity imo. maybe thats why so many SW users use Rhino. ask them.