business cards

im a currently working on creating my own business card to present to potential employers and clients. design-wise ive hit a wall, just wondering if i could get some examples of others i.d. business cards.

Why don’t you post up what you’ve got so far, that way we can get a little dialog going…

In a way, I consider business cards a formality, a relic from a bygone era. It’s not yet fast enough and easy enough to trade info electronically, so the business card persists. (but we’re getting there) For ID’ers, being the forward thinking people we are, I prefer simpler the better. Name, email or website, maybe phone number and that’s it. Don’t over think it, simple copy, simple colors, nice paper is great if you can afford it.

I often see students go way too far with their first cards with die cuts, and multiple colors, finishes and awkward logos, etc. etc.

Graphis Letterhead.



http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_gw?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=graphis+letterhead

here’s the template i started with the other day. i like the vertical layout, and the alignment of the text at the bottom. the “www…com/portfolio” is for my personal website im working on right now. i have been playing with different images and graphics for the layout at the top but am not sure what i will go with.

Well, the business card is of course super personal.

I like to keep the card really simple. No gimmicks. Your layout is not bad. Very clean.
I just wonder why is the proportion so stretched out?
One think I always find frustrating with cards is that when they are odd shaped, they NEVER fit into the wallet or business card binder.

Also, if you work with different gray shades, make sure you proof it. The way it looks on your screen and in print can be very very different.

So keep in mind, for you the info is very familiar, but for somebody you are handing the card to it isn’t. So your main objective is to communicate information as directly and easy as possible.

edit: on second thought, it might just be me… is it classic b card dimensions?

I would definitely second bepster’s comments about proofing. That light grey is almost unreadable. In your contact info, the font is to large, the kerning is too much (slightly) the line height is too little. A few tweaks IMO and it would be good to go. Leave the white space on the top alone! do not put images there, leave that for your portfolio, please! :smiley:

jfox,

Following on the heels of bepster and bennybtl… Way too low on the contrast and it’s crowded. Don’t make people have to take an extra second to read your info. That split second could make the difference between someone taking you seriously or not. Like bepster said… “direct and easy.” Don’t screw around with trying to make your name/contact info look clever.

If you want to get designy, do that with your logo, material execution of the card, or anything that doesn’t directly interfere with how easy it is to remember your name or see your digits.

Good luck.

Just an ergonomic observation; since most business cards are printed in “landscape” orientation, that is how they are presented. As a result, that usually means that the bearer’s thumb obscures some portion of the card.

Presenting this card, by holding it at the end, allows the reader to see the entire message, and in an unexpected, and memorable, way.

Don’t forget that the card has a second side.

In case this wasn’t mentioned, this might inspire you a little bit:

Talk with your printer. I doubt they can keep the registration for the bottom and right justification. My guess is that they can hold 0.063.

Well, if you want to get hardcore, you could always print the registration marks and trim by hand.

thanks for all the feedback guys. i have been out of town for the last few days so this is the first im seeing of all this info. i was thinking about it today on my way home and when i read:



Lmo
PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2009 11:15 am Post subject:
Just an ergonomic observation; since most business cards are printed in “landscape” orientation, that is how they are presented. As a result, that usually means that the bearer’s thumb obscures some portion of the card.

Presenting this card, by holding it at the end, allows the reader to see the entire message, and in an unexpected, and memorable, way.

Don’t forget that the card has a second side.

-----you took the words right out of my mouth.

i started to think about using the other side. and i think i might put a short “signature” comment or quote or something clever. maybe an illustrator style fox (the animal) or something.

anyways, i work on revising with all the feed back in mind and ill post another copy in the next few days.

thanks again.