Best training for "boring" ID

I’m interested in studying ID in the states, but have no interest in the hot topics offered by many ID programs (e.g. ACCD), such as cars, sporting goods, footware or furniture. I’m wondering where is a good place to learn to design more mundane stuff like kitchen sinks, consumer electronics, or office products. I feel many US ID programs treat these things as not being sexy enough and only appropriate for mechancial engineers (which I’m not interested in studying). What US ID programs do people recommend?

IF you think you can choose what to design, then it’s just going to be the beginning of a dreadful experience for you.

Over the years in school I’ve done projects like consumer electronics, furniture, kitchenware, transportation, powertools, landscape lighting fixture, tabletop decoratives and more. I never asked to do them or reject them. I take them as they come and I enjoy every single of them. The design process is similar but with different focus and sets of knowledge. To me, it depends on what your focus is and how you approach the project. For example a shoe project. Most students will take it as a styling exercise, but I’d approach it as a utilitarian one, with focus on ergonomics, material science and manufacturing techniques, and hence the styling.

If you start to choose what to like before even experiencing it, then you are just limiting your scope.

In school, I think what matters is not the project, but the instructor conducting the class and most importantly, your attitude.

One can view design as a mercenary activity, though I can’t imagine why one would bother just doing any design project one can find available, since there are so many easier non-design careers where one can forage for table scraps. Design can be able adding value to society, and I’m curious what US programs emphasize that, if any. By the material I see posted on the Web, it seems most programs and graduates are concerned with making cool stuff, and not much more than that.

My point is that some programs seem to be able cranking out endless renderings of cars or chairs, none of which have any demonstrable value greater than any other car or chair stylings. It’s fine that some people like car styling, it’s just not what I am personally interested in.

I used to think like you. I’m in CCS, the place where you will find hot-headed car designer wannabies and renderings after renderings. But so what? Why do you care so much about how others approach their studies? If you want to be better than others, then you WILL do whatever it takes to get there. If you want to have an emphasis on things other than styling, you will do it, on your own, despite of the program you are in.

If you think you want to depend on the program to succeed, you are wrong. They merely give you the stage. The play is all up to you. You can just stick with it and get minimum result, or you can jump beyond the given stage and excel in your own way.

There are programs with more emphasis on what you want( Ohio, CIA, Cincinnati and others). However, again, they can only provide so much. The rest is totally up to you.

“Design can be able adding value to society, and I’m curious what US programs emphasize that, if any. By the material I see posted on the Web, it seems most programs and graduates are concerned with making cool stuff, and not much more than that”

good for you, great basis for starting a design education…wish there were more of us with this kind of optimism and sense of purpose

“used to think like you. I’m in CCS, the place where you will find hot-headed car designer wannabies and renderings after renderings. But so what? Why do you care so much about how others approach their studies? If you want to be better than others, then you WILL do whatever it takes to get there. If you want to have an emphasis on things other than styling, you will do it, on your own, despite of the program you are in.”

I have to agree, often this is the approach one must take, working within the system to change the system. let’s not excuse the shortcomings of design education though, we are lacking in addressing social, environmental implications of design…teaching young designers to see themselves in a position of responsibility and giving them the tools to create meaningful, sustainable solutions and not just churning out visual emphemera…check out some of the european schools, they seem to be ahead of the u.s. somewhat in addressing social, environmental aspects of design as well as usability


really complex issues here with alot of interest involved other than just designers themselves - industry, global markets, popular culture …but we still need to start moving in a better direction than exists now, especially in light of the rapid changes taking place within the natural environment …may need to start with some like you digging their heels in and asking their schools to address this, raise awareness within the school or program through student groups, student advisory boards, etc[/quote]

“Design can be able adding value to society, and I’m curious what US programs emphasize that, if any. By the material I see posted on the Web, it seems most programs and graduates are concerned with making cool stuff, and not much more than that”

good for you, great basis for starting a design education…wish there were more of us with this kind of optimism and sense of purpose

“used to think like you. I’m in CCS, the place where you will find hot-headed car designer wannabies and renderings after renderings. But so what? Why do you care so much about how others approach their studies? If you want to be better than others, then you WILL do whatever it takes to get there. If you want to have an emphasis on things other than styling, you will do it, on your own, despite of the program you are in.”

I have to agree, often this is the approach one must take, working within the system to change the system. let’s not excuse the shortcomings of design education though, we are lacking in addressing social, environmental implications of design…teaching young designers to see themselves in a position of responsibility and giving them the tools to create meaningful, sustainable solutions and not just churning out visual emphemera…check out some of the european schools, they seem to be ahead of the u.s. somewhat in addressing social, environmental aspects of design as well as usability


really complex issues here with alot of interest involved other than just designers themselves - industry, global markets, popular culture …but we still need to start moving in a better direction than exists now, especially in light of the rapid changes taking place within the natural environment …may need to start with some like you digging their heels in and asking their schools to address this, raise awareness within the school or program through student groups, student advisory boards, etc

I’m curious witch programs you are comparing to U.S. schools? And how you feel they teach their students to add value to products where our (American) programs fail?

If you are so concerned about American ID programs not living up to your expectations you may want to consider studying els-ware. No?