[b]Long Beach, University of California at[/b]

How is the ID program at L.B. regarded?

Does the school have excellent industry ties?
What kind of work have graduates produced?

Any & info greatly appreciated.
Thanks.
[/b]

Did anyone even know they had a design program at U. of Cal. - Long Beach?

I know school is mostly what you make of it. But, if a school doesn’t have contacts within various ID firms or professors still connected/practicing within the ID world, then it is hard for the student to get insight into the inner workings of an ID firm. You know… what’s expected & how things are done in the real world vs. the classroom. That is something not so easliy ascertained from books or websites. I just wanna know if that opportunity exists at L.B. That is something that i need a school to have.

I hoped L.B. would have similar contacts (maybe not in scope, but just in general…) as that of neighboring Art Center. They’re only 20 minutes apart and both in the L.A. area.

Anyone?

Mr. Moderator - YO - i need your help!

LB used to have a well regarded program. many of the instructors from Art Center also taught at LB and the program was run by Herb Tyrnauer who was a great program chair.

the portfolios i’ve seen in the past few years have been pretty lackluster. the projects didnt have any ‘depth’ and the execution was average.

seemed like it was in a bit of a slump.

The program is actually quite good, although I agree that the student work has been a bit lackluster the past couple of years. Jose is a great guy, and the facilities aren’t bad. I found that they focus a lot on hands-on modeling and working in the shop - that was one of my main attractions. Good faculty, strong emphasis on hands on work… there’s one big downside though: Long Beach is literally one of the worst places I’ve ever lived. It’s the barrio. The pits. A parking lot. A vacation to Anaheim started looking good after spending 6 months in Long Beach.

If you don’t give a hoot about where you live, and want a good program that puts emphasis on hands-on modeling and machining, LB is a good choice. The in-state costs are very fair.

good luck whatever you choose.

Nice to hear good, positive stuff about LB.

Sounds like Art Center drained LB’s faculty like a vampire.

I was looking at their course descriptions, and found they used to offer a graduate degree in ID. However, this year they are not accepting any new graduate students. They are going to revamp their program. If the Chair person left and faculty were lured by Art Center, then maybe that is why. I don’t know…

Someone said LB is a “hands-on” school. Is Art Center a “hands-on” school? How would you compare Art Center’s approach?

LB is in the same locale as Art Center, so if firms/big wigs are checking out Art Center students, then i don’t see why they wouldn’t also take a look at LB while they’re in the immediate area…

Thanks for the replies to my thread!

Anyone else have info on the current LB faculty?

Some of LB is pretty nice. My aunt lives in the Bixby Knolls (sp.?) area. They’re always filming movies in her neighborhood. A few years ago it was “Donnie Darko.” At the time I was like, “Donnie what?” Ironically, now it’s one of my faves.

But, yeah, there are some less attractive areas. I asume you’re talking about the immediate neighborhoods surrounding the school. I’ve yet to see the campus 'cause i only recently learned of ID.

Are you looking for graduate work or undergrad? Art center is a really different experience altogether. In the case of undergraduate work at LB, you have a lot of “non art” class requirements - anthropology. history, english, american government… The Cal and UC schools shoot for a more “rounded” exposure to learning… At Art Center, you do art. Lots and lots of art…

…so, it’s really a personal choice. Assuming you got into both LB and Art Center, consider that Art Center will literally tax you to your limits on studio classes and hands on work. LB is quite a bit more balanced - some people like that, some don’t. Personally, I didn’t want an all-art experience, and liked the low cost and broad education. Trade school vs. Traditional University. However, I can see how that wouldn’t appeal to some - if you know you want to focus on art, and perhaps have broad life experience already…

Regarding LB’s location, you’re right - there are some places away from the campus that are OK. But honestly, I spent so much focused time finishing my program that a commute wasn’t an option. Traffic is really bad, so being close to the school was key - so my daily landscape was… apocalyptic.

I hadn’t heard the program was closed to students though. Call the department and chat with them - they’re all approachable people, unlike San Jose State - good luck getting those guys on the phone :wink:



Thanks for the replies.

One thing i don’t want to do is build an unnecessary student loan debt. And, I do believe that college really is what you make of it. However, that being said, if certain opportunities, technology, and/or exposure to information (be it internship, theory, real world practice, etc…) are absent at a school, then i (the student) will have a difficult time maximizing my knowledge, skills, and experience. I’m trying to figure out what’s missing from different schools and how/if i can fill in the missing pieces.

Back to unnnecessary debt; why graduate with $160,000-$200,000 of debt when you can graduate with, say, $40,000 debt and have the exact same job opportunities? For top jobs, schools don’t get jobs, individuals do. I can see maybe if there was a toss-up for a position, then maybe an employer might choose the guy from a big-name school. But, maybe they wouldn’t. I think that (especially in the design field) that individuals with the “best” ideation, creativity, communication, adaptability, and skills will have the most rewarding and/or lucrative opportunities regardless of their schooling, or lack thereof.

Big-name shool vs “little” school or traditional university… On the other hand, i don’t want to sell myself short. It’s possible that i could be missing out on vital experience that could tap into/unearth my true creative potential.

That is my dilemma!

Can anyone tell me more about the Long Beach “experience” regarding classes, internship experiences there, facilities there, impressive guest speakers who spoke there, exciting/impressive ID firms with conncetions there, quality of the computer programs used/taught there, etc…

Can anyone expound more upon the Art Center experience? What “additional art” does one create there? What separates the experience as being “worth” the extra money?

Anyone?

my friend went to LB and disliked the program. now he’s trying to get into accd.

Herb Tyrnauer, isn’t he dead?

I graduated LB class of 2002. Back then LB was rated 8th out of over 300 ID programs. I have no idea how it’s ranked today. I found it to be a great program for the process of design. We learned how to think, and create innovative products. I pains me to hear everyone bitch about the location. I lived in Huntington Beach 1/2 mile from the ocean. My commute was down PCH… a beautiful drive for those who haven’t been there. I was able to surf in the mornings before class, and I still miss that to this day. If you hate Long beach, move south 5 miles!
I can’t speak for the last 3 years, but will say that our projects were a LOT more process driven than art center. Art center always seemed to be about a pretty picture, but the designs weren’t realistic-all very conceptual. The students didn’t seem to have a clue about manufacturability, mechanics or physics. ( I obviously can’t speak for the entire school, just the ones I’ve met) In the firms I’ve worked so far, pretty pictures only get you so far. Thought proccess and knowledge of the design process seems to get you farther.

As far as jobs and connections,
I had a job my senior year, and haven’t had trouble finding a job since. We had reviews every month or so my junior and senior year with 15-30 ID proffesionals, many of which were LB grads. At the time, there were always a few firms around campus who were always looking for fresh talent.
The students with talent had jobs long before graduation.

I can’t speak for everyone, but I will say that I’m quite pleased with the education I recieved. My class, and the class ahead all found ID positions for the most part . (this is no small achievement considering 9/11 and the economy at the time)

I hope this helps. If you have any more questions, I’d be happy to share my view of LB through my rose colored glasses!!
:laughing:

I completely agree with this statement. LB was all about making real stuff, and we spent a good deal of time with our hands on renshape, foam, etc - Art Center is awesome, but completely focused on the aesthetic. I learned machining, SLA, and a number of other great modeling and tech skills at LB…

Honestly, the only way you’re going to be able to know what school is right for you is to GO there and visit with the faculty. Whether you spend 120k or 15k for your education, it means nothing if it doesn’t meet your own goals. No one here can tell you for sure what to expect.

Who gets better jobs, Art Center of LB? Great question. Everyone is going to have their own opinion - go find out for yourself. My experience is that ID jobs are hard to come by no matter what school you went to - Art Center is going to have much better name recognition, but not even that matters anymore. It’s all about what you can do, and what more you bring to the table. What other unique skills do you add to your ID background. Any management or business experience? Any good tech skills?

I would like to attend Long Beach, but when I looked at the schedule of classes for the Jr and Sr year, it only listed one design class per semester. Does this mean that I would be learning about design from only one instructor named Kamermire and what studios did he work at?

How many ID teachers will I be learning from during my Jr/Sr year are working ID professionals?

You’re right…there are minimal required classes junior and senior year… This makes it a great time to take more electives, like trans, or furniture… I found it a great time to finish my undergrad, as well as hold an almost fulltime design job. LB has a long program, no doubt. The FASTEST you can get through is 4.5 years… If you have general ED requirements, it may take longer. I would talk to Kammermeyer about how they structure classes now. In my Junior and senior years, they had the same thing (kammermeyer) listed, but then they brought in people from industry to teach instead. My second semester junior year was a pro from the field. Our senior year, we had a different pro come in, and then our final semester, we had a faculty member teach. From what I saw, it did change every semester, so I woul d check with what’s going on now. BTW this info is from graduating class 2002, so could be a tad dated… :wink:

I only took the senior studio class my last year but I worked 24-30 hrs at a design consultancy. I learned what it takes to design in the real world which is way more benefiticial than taking electives. Kammermeyer has connections to give opportunies to students that can handle work out side of school.

Thanks for the feedback.

I’m going to visit the campus in mid-November. And, i’ll also check out Art Center while i’m in town.

In the real world, don’t designers often work in teams? Not every designer is “complete.” Probably very few overall. I think some may be strong in ideation, some better at understanding manufacturing obstacles/issues/realities, whereas others can take someone else’s idea and make it look really great (commercial aesethics) with their “art” skills.

I’ve no experience in design whatsoever, but i would think that those with the “best” ideas and who also possess the innate ability to communicate what exactly it is they are trying to achieve, would command much higher desirablility among employers than those that lack ideation or originality, but who can bring someone else’s idea(s) to life with their “art” skills.

Obviously, the handful of designers that possess all those abilities would be able to write their own ticket, so to speak. Of these gifted few, many may freelance or only tackle/dabble projects that they have a personal interest in.

The guys that come up with the ideas would seem to get paid more than the “art” guys that transform the idea into “full color,” so to speak.

Am i correct on these suppositions?

You’re expected to come up with your own neat ideas AND illustrate and communicate them in “full color.” If I were you, I would take a VERY close look at Art Center while in the area.

Here’s what i don’t understand: then why would designers even work for somebody else? Designers should all be entrpeneurs and be making great money off of their creativity. They’d have businesses by the balls; businesses would be left eith the choice: either produce an unappealing, anti-ergnomic, uncreative, flat-out ugly product that just will not sell, or pay the designers what they’re asking for (great money), and then the businesses get to make millions off of the designers skills & creativity. It just makes no sense why designers would pimp themselves out for pennies when it’s their talents that ideas & talents that help make it even possible for businesses to make oodles & oodles of mula.

All the talk on this site about too many designers flooding the field (then why is there so much crap being made in the world today???), not enough jobs, and cruddy pay leave me in complete consternation. I just don’t understand. Could someone please illuminate this matter for me???

Here’s what i don’t understand: then why would designers even work for somebody else? Designers should all be entrpeneurs and be making great money off of their creativity. They’d have businesses by the balls; businesses would be left with the choice: either produce an unappealing, anti-ergnomic, uncreative, clunky, flat-out ugly product that just will not sell, or pay the designers what they’re asking for (great money), and then the businesses get to make millions off of the designers skills & creativity. Seems like a simple choice. It just makes no sense why designers would pimp themselves out for pennies, when it’s their talents & ideas that help make it even possible for businesses to make oodles & oodles of mula.

All the talk on this site about too many designers flooding the field (then why is there so much crap being made in the world today??? where are all the good designers???), not enough jobs, and cruddy pay leave me in complete consternation. I just don’t understand. Could someone please illuminate this matter for me???