3-D Printed Cast

http://jakevilldesign.dunked.com/cortex

Interesting. If it fits tightly, as a cast must, how does one put it on?

And if it doesn’t fit tightly… it’s not worth much. Perhaps this is “the prototype” on a model’s arm - as opposed to the arm that was originally scanned.

This is art. Not something real. Nothing to see here. Move along.

If its 3d printed to fit on your arm, do you stick your arm in the printer for 10 hours? Or is there some magic hinge/closure?

Neat daydream.

R

Thought of this the other day, and how the uninformed can take things like this and run with it.

Was at my kids swimming lesson and a young guy shows his mom a picture if this cast and says “Cool. It’s a 3D printed cast. You don’t even need the doctor you just print it out on your printer. Saves you money.”

That, is terrifying to me.

It’s not 3d printed, a solid cast is applied normally, then it’s milled out.

Actually, it would probably be easier/cheaper/quicker to laser cut out a normal fibreglass cast than 3d print to similar effect…

Or, I’m sure there must be some way to have a web substrate with impregnated resin to harden to similar result. Hmmm. Might just have to patent that.



R

Fastening could be solved any number of ways. Cool idea, let’s your skin breathe (main drawback of having a cast).

This takes the fun out of cutting my cast off with a 5" grinder

imagine the tan lines!

Could also use a heat shrinking material. You would just slip the general cast on and then heat it up to form to the person’s arm.

Blog fodder.

Obvious fastening issues notwithstanding, the bigger dealbreaker is probably that you need a 3D scan of your arm in its pre-broken state. Most broken bones happen to kids, and they are constantly changing, so even getting an annual just-in-case scan would probably not be enough. And notwithstanding all that, you will have a semi-permanent indented waffleprint / sunburn pattern when you take this off.

Like Richard said, you could come up with a sparsely woven fiberglass cloth that would give you breathability if that’s what you wanted. Having to put a $250k 3D printer in every medical office in the country (and sit through a 10 hour build time per cast) would increase our insurance cost by double digit percentages. Oh wait, that 3D printer, and its material, would be classified as a medical device and need FDA approval, so the cost just went up to $500k.

We were recently billed a couple thousand dollars to get a forearm cast on a hairline fracture (no setting required), and that took about 30 minutes, including the time to come back and have it removed.

Scott your post is exactly why what I heard terrified me. The painfully uninformed see this as a savings because its “just 3D printed!” And they fail to see the true costs and logistical hurdles that need to be over come.

Does one need a special permit to publish design masturbation?

Call me a prude, but I think it should be kept private.

Tissue anyone?

Actually, I think the visual is the design, not the object in the visual. The visual was designed to get lots of PR. It accomplished that design goal. Nothing more will come of this visual other than PR, media, and possible jobs resulting there in. Less design masturbation, and more the design version of a guy painted all silver in the city center… gets your attention, you smile for a second, maybe it provokes a thought, you go about the rest of your day. I like it (as an image), but mostly because you guys don’t. :wink:

Actually, it would probably be easier/cheaper/quicker to laser cut out a normal fibreglass cast than 3d print to similar effect…

Or, I’m sure > there must be some way to have a web substrate with impregnated resin > to harden to similar result. Hmmm. Might just have to patent that.

Yes, there is … . . Orthopedic cast and method of making the same - ASHERMAN RICHARD E.

I read that patent to learn legalese for an arm: “affected extremity 25” listed 18 times. Not bad.

The quick solution would be to scan the other unbroken arm and mirror the data. Would likely work in the majority of cases. Volumetric tweaking for dominant arm muscle would be easy to imagine.

Plastic snap fittings would connect the two halves, one way barbs. Custom graphics like Crania Anatomica could give you a tan tattoo as a reminder.

Visually it is striking and appealing, but the attachment/ fitting is a cop-out:

The magic beans aren’t shown. Potentially a great project if a bit more work were to be done on it.

I can buy that argument. But then there is no difference between the OP and this. Should there be a line drawn at some point? Maybe I have a bias against vaporware. I dunno.

good point. Looking at that bike is painful. It is a judgement call I think. Some concepts are going to far (or is it not far enough in this case?) and some will be thought provocative little nuggets. I think we did some nice versions of this when I was at frog. This is not really a great electric motorcycle, nor is it how you would really prioritize information on a projected HUD, but it shows the idea of a projected HUD well.