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Re: Industrial Design and Crime

Postby RaraBlackSheep » February 28th, 2014, 7:19 pm

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Travisimo wrote:
jon_winebrenner wrote:
Have you heard of Engineers without Borders. They take on problems like lighting in Africa and organize groups to tackle it.. Designers absolutely add value



Who is eligible for a placement?
Placements are open to UK and Republic of Ireland resident university students and recent graduates over the age of 18. Applicants with four or fewer years of technical experience are our priority but if we are unable to identify a suitable applicant in that category we may offer the placement to someone with more experience.



I'm baffled that, at 30, I am basically too old for this unless they have no other options to choose from. Is there some reason for this that I am missing? Perhaps inexperienced 'kids' maybe easier to wrangle or less likely to question authority? Not enough problems and challenges in developing/war-torn nations to go around maybe? :?

Re: Industrial Design and Crime

Postby mirk » February 28th, 2014, 7:41 pm

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I took a long bus ride with the CEO of EWB Canada once, and he really stressed their commitment to promoting youth. Most of their volunteers are university students, and they even place students on their board of directors. I think it stems from the same rational that governs internships, it's more about providing experience, as the challenges they face aren't highly technical in nature. Most of the full-time jobs are taken by people with degrees in international development and the like.
Mike Coyle

Tonik Sound

Re: Industrial Design and Crime

Postby RaraBlackSheep » February 28th, 2014, 8:21 pm

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Interesting. I just noticed the site linked is the UK organization, but it sounds like it's the same in Canada (and probably the US, I didn't see anything like I posted above on a quick look around the US site). But now I am curious - what kind of problems/projects do they wind up working on?

Re: Industrial Design and Crime

Postby mirk » March 1st, 2014, 8:13 pm

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Actually a lot of stuff that you wouldn't directly associate with engineering. You've probably heard of a lot of them: micro-loans, building schools, sanitation, irrigation, etc. They have a few listed here: http://www.ewb.ca/ventures

I can't speak for them, but I think they're looking to add an engineering mindset to those types of problems, rather than literally going and providing engineering and design services to developing regions. In fact, in the talk I attended, most of the audience were international development students as well, only 3 or 4 engineers in the crowd.
Mike Coyle

Tonik Sound

Re: Industrial Design and Crime

Postby RaraBlackSheep » March 2nd, 2014, 12:01 am

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That's pretty cool/interesting. I guess I have never really put much thought in to how those things would operate!

/derailment

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