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shoenista
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rkuchinsky wrote:Another to add-

#12 (or whatever we are at)-
Fire a client. (More applicable to a consultant, but equal in corporate would be to say "no" to an internal team or boss on a project request).

One of the hardest things in business is knowing when to say "no". Doing so will not only reinforce why you do what you do, but make doing it that much more purposeful.

R


I've done this. I agree.

The other thing with freelancers/consultancies that are new is an inability to turn down work. It's important to learn that not every potential client out there is going to be good for your business. It's like dating, there has to be a good fit in order for it to work.

Also to learn to stick to your guns when you quote someone on a project. To be able to say no and walk away when they want to pay you low rates.

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shoenista
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yo wrote:Working on the line, that is pretty cool!

Had to do this as part of my footwear degree. First year was pretty much learning to pattern cut, grade, make, work in factories and learn how to work with a sample room in a factory. Our end of year exam was to pattern cut every basic style of shoe (about 20 I think, incl. mocassins, sneakers, long leg high heel boots etc) and make and last an upper from the patterns that you had cut.
We learned how to work with last makers, heel makers, tanneries, where to place the pattern pieces on a hide, how to pitch a heel.
We still didn't learn everything though. Am very envious of friends of mine who have worked at Clarks, because they teach their designers how to fit shoes, which is such a useful skill to have.

But I can't tell you how much I still lean on this shoemaking knowledge. The ability to be able to go into a factory and examine the paper patterns and adjust them when the rookie pattern cutter has screwed up.

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powaz
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Presently 6ing. Hoping to get 2ed once I have a 7 lined up. Would also go for another 4 or 5.


1. Make/Fix something for your own use
2. Get fired
3. Bring a product to market, with your own money
4. Start your own consultancy
5. Pitch/sell an idea to investors
6. Work corporate
7. Work in a consultancy
8. Live/Work in a different country
9. Teach
10. Work on a royalty or equity basis

also on my list:

Join/start a startup. I'm sure I'll wind up teaching at some point. Especially if I can't manage to make anything of my design career. :wink:

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yo
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powaz wrote:Presently 6ing. Hoping to get 2ed once I have a 7 lined up.


;-) That is funny. I've never been 2ed, though I'm sure there were individuals who wish I was! I hope to never cross that one off the list...


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Just for the dinner party conversations or when the random stranger at a bar asks what you do.

Design a "adult recreational toy"!!!

Ohh imagine all the different reactions you get.

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jon_winebrenner
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berat001 wrote:Design a "adult recreational toy"!!!


Seems to be all the rage these days...designing them of course...never seen one in person :D


engio
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berat001 wrote:Just for the dinner party conversations or when the random stranger at a bar asks what you do.

Design a "adult recreational toy"!!!

Ohh imagine all the different reactions you get.


Our 3Dprinting and prototyping vendor did work for a company who makes sex toys. They always show iteration prototypes at demos and trade fairs. I always think about how fun that project must have been.. you'd have to be pretty comfortable with your team mates..

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ADD
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1. Make/Fix something for your own use
There is always something to be made/fix any point of time. I have been attending it.
2. Get fired
I have never pushed to travel that path.
3. Bring a product to market, with your own money
I am trying this one.(side activity) I am hoping that it will work.
4. Start your own consultancy
I have done that after my design education for five years. I have worked in various design domains. It was a great experience. However, I have failed to get good growth, good money & good clients.
5. Pitch/sell an idea to investors
I pitch few concepts over the net. If somebody gets interested, I will sell it. I know it is not exactly same as intended here.
6. Work corporate
I want to do that. Good corporate with established design studio. (No.. for design undervalued places)
7. Work in a consultancy
I want to do that. I have been trying this for few years. Every year, I apply for 4 to 5 international design consultancies. :(
8. Live/Work in a different country
I think - it is a good idea to live & work in a different country. (It worked for me & many great designers :wink: …)
9. Teach
I have started sharing my thoughts, resources. I am not there yet.
10. Work on a royalty or equity basis
I have designed few products for that. But it is a subjective thing, in terms of getting accepted for the royalty.

Fire a client : Last year, I have walked away from the project.
My client was kept demanding more concepts without commercial re-framing.


pier
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There are some good ideals on this growing list. I shall try and add some new or slightly tangent:

Completely assemble one of your own design in whatever factory alongside the actual assemblers. As slippy says, curse the day you decided to conceal the fasteners, and you can enjoy your bleeding knuckles when you learn about tool clearance.

Create an image reference library. Inspiration can be hard sometimes.

Patent something.

Write an article for publication, any venue is fine.

Take a continuing education class in something like law, accounting, project managment.

Volunteer help produce a conference, seminar, class.

Be tested by a value: the inevitable classic is to be asked to copy something or design something unsafe.

Go to a graduate show and actually engage the students in interested discussion. Although, probably you should do this more than once.

Have a meaningful talk with a CEO, CFO, about business, not just hiring.

Have a humbling experience somehow related to your work (for me it was a young guy explaining, after I had made what I thought was an innocent comment on advancement, that he would be perfectly happy to work in this factory for the rest of his career.)

Give your mother something you designed regardless how esoteric it is.

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HRhV
 
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pier wrote:Give your mother something you designed regardless how esoteric it is.


I love the idea of this, as sometimes the harshest critics are the ones closest to you. Probably best to not give her some of the 'adult toys' that were being discussed though...

A few of my own to add to the list:

Live with a design every day - rather than just try it out, try to live with something you have designed using it every day. It makes you consider the lifecycle of a product in much more depth.

Work promoting a design you've worked on - trying to sell a design based on 'marketing reasons' rather than your own philosophy behind the design

Build a house - because you can

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Greenman
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skyarrow wrote:Been a while since I last posted, but still an avid lurker/browser...

I can vouch for #2 on the list. Though that can be broken down in two categories:
1) Getting fired
2) Getting laid off

I've had the dubious pleasure of being on the receiving end of both of those and while at that moment it doesn't matter which of the two it actually is, (its still a kick in the teeth), you can at least make peace with #2 by knowing that it wasn't personal and probably not any reflection on you as a professional.

#1 is trickier. A lot of soul searching / self examination is required, but the sting of this too can be eased over time by keying in on what happened and what you could have done better. Accept responsibility for those things you did wrong and learn from them.

Either way, it can be devastating at the time, but in the long run can serve to give you some valuable experience and hopefully make you a better person/designer/employee.


What do you think would be worse, getting fired intentionally or just packing a box and walking?
All dots connect, even the tiny blue one

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rkuchinsky
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Greenman wrote:
skyarrow wrote:Been a while since I last posted, but still an avid lurker/browser...

I can vouch for #2 on the list. Though that can be broken down in two categories:
1) Getting fired
2) Getting laid off

I've had the dubious pleasure of being on the receiving end of both of those and while at that moment it doesn't matter which of the two it actually is, (its still a kick in the teeth), you can at least make peace with #2 by knowing that it wasn't personal and probably not any reflection on you as a professional.

#1 is trickier. A lot of soul searching / self examination is required, but the sting of this too can be eased over time by keying in on what happened and what you could have done better. Accept responsibility for those things you did wrong and learn from them.

Either way, it can be devastating at the time, but in the long run can serve to give you some valuable experience and hopefully make you a better person/designer/employee.


What do you think would be worse, getting fired intentionally or just packing a box and walking?


neither is the professional thing to do.

R
Richard Kuchinsky / Directive Creator
http://www.rkuchinsky.com

The Directive Collective
http://www.directivecollective.com


iab
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pier wrote:Give your mother something you designed regardless how esoteric it is.


I don't think she can use a pregnancy tester. At least, I hope not. :shock:

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Travisimo
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nice one IAB

I thought of another: Hire a company where you had formerly worked for design services, reversing the relationship

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Timf
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1. Make/Fix something for your own use - Yes
2. Get fired - Yes
3. Bring a product to market, with your own money - No
4. Start your own consultancy - Yes
5. Pitch/sell an idea to investors - No
6. Work corporate - Yes
7. Work in a consultancy - Yes
8. Live/Work in a different country - Yes
9. Teach - Yes
10. Work on a royalty or equity basis - No

Seven out of ten. Not bad at this point in my life :)

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