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Re: Pro-E (Creo) Surfacing Resources?

Postby Cyberdemon » March 17th, 2014, 8:34 pm

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Monkee wrote:If you have used Creo for some time. It will be plain and simple to do many of the things need. It is really not that hard to create a sketch, a form, building an assembly and create drawings.

People who complain about the UI because they are new and do not have the experience with using the software. It is like learning another software for the first time. Learning Photoshop or Illustrator. Once you understand how to do it. It is straight forward.

Making vague assumptions without a good understanding of what you are saying is just poor practice. I remember some time ago someone said there is a lot of miss-information on the Internet.


I've used Pro E as my primary solid tool for 7 years since Wildfire 2 and witnessed all of the UI changes that have come along with it, and that includes spending time in Chicago @ Design Engine for a Pro E course. I am complaining about the UI because it has gone from suck to less suck - and that's with a laundry list of CAD, 2D and 3D tools under my belt. There are simply logical inconsistencies, mental models and flows which will apply to one tool but not another, and other behaviors that are simply far smoother in other tools. Regardless of what I think of it, it is not nearly as easy to pick up as other tools for surfacing and is worth the investment for professional training. If it were that easy, Design Engine would be out of business and the people in this thread would be referring him to Lynda.com or some other Youtube video.

Re: Pro-E (Creo) Surfacing Resources?

Postby Monkee » March 18th, 2014, 5:15 pm


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Cyberdemon wrote:I've used Pro E as my primary solid tool for 7 years since Wildfire 2 and witnessed all of the UI changes that have come along with it, and that includes spending time in Chicago @ Design Engine for a Pro E course. I am complaining about the UI because it has gone from suck to less suck - and that's with a laundry list of CAD, 2D and 3D tools under my belt. There are simply logical inconsistencies, mental models and flows which will apply to one tool but not another, and other behaviors that are simply far smoother in other tools. Regardless of what I think of it, it is not nearly as easy to pick up as other tools for surfacing and is worth the investment for professional training. If it were that easy, Design Engine would be out of business and the people in this thread would be referring him to Lynda.com or some other Youtube video.


You are still talking about Pro E. That is more than 5 years ago. Creo Parametric is a full parametric software. It is a sophisticated technology in this aspect that is very useful for developing products beyond basic parts, allowing companies to produce complex machine and large assembly products. Pretty much all CAD software can do the basic stuff. The parametric software may need you to specific more requirements for using each of the tools but this ensures reliability and better performance.

The software can be easily used once you understand how to use it. If you pay for support and done the training. You can get going. The support by the resellers are very good. All you need to do is contact them and they will show you exactly what you need. There is a certain way to do technical things, but this is important for technical sophisticated jobs.
Last edited by Monkee on March 18th, 2014, 6:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Re: Pro-E (Creo) Surfacing Resources?

Postby sprockets » March 18th, 2014, 5:55 pm

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Cyberdemon wrote:I am complaining about the UI because it has gone from suck to less suck


+1 to that. I now lose a less time each week explaining to coworkers how to do something and most of the time they still ask "why wasn't that easier?"
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Re: Pro-E (Creo) Surfacing Resources?

Postby Cyberdemon » March 18th, 2014, 7:40 pm

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Monkee wrote:You are still talking about Pro E. That is more than 5 years ago. Creo Parametric is a full parametric software. It is a sophisticated technology in this aspect that is very useful for developing products beyond basic parts, allowing companies to produce complex machine and large assembly products. Pretty much all CAD software can do the basic stuff. The parametric software may need you to specific more requirements for using each of the tools but this ensures reliability and better performance.

The software can be easily used once you understand how to use it. If you pay for support and done the training. You can get going. The support by the resellers are very good. All you need to do is contact them and they will show you exactly what you need. There is a certain way to do technical things, but this is important for technical sophisticated jobs.


I am talking about "PTC Creo Parametric Version Two Point Oh". I call it Pro E because randomly changing the name halfway through doesn't change the fact that it's the same tool with an updated GUI.

But I digress because this is starting to sound like reseller trolling and not answering the OP's question which I think has been covered.

/dead horse beaten

Re: Pro-E (Creo) Surfacing Resources?

Postby design-engine » January 11th, 2016, 8:41 am

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I catch myself calling it Pro/E still. We found many designers think they know Solidworks and we quicly understand what they know in the Full week of our Solidworks Surfacing class. From a technical perspective, any of our surfacing week long classes offer unique insight into technical surfacing discussing G2 G3 continuity defining A-Class surfacing in ways that set you apart from others in your organization.

Consider calling us about training. we have a special 7 day intensive for those ID'ers that already know Alias Studio or Rhino 3d and there is one coming up. Im sure the account managers whom answer the phone can work you a deal. It's worth a chat. We have three training classes going on this week in Austin TX all to ID teams.

http://proetools.com/category/courses/creo-surfacing/ < all creo surfacing classes

Special Creo 7 day intensive for Industrial designers http://proetools.com/proengineer-traini ... al-design/ < this class is usually 6 days a week 10+ hrs per day. Im doing this next week and it's basics thru surfacing all in the week. Id'ers need Rhino or Alias experience as a pre req.

Solidworks to Creo http://proetools.com/proengineer-to-solidworks-class/ one week Creo class
Bart Brejcha
DESIGN-ENGINE|EDUCATION

http://design-engine.com/category/courses/ SolidWorks surfacing classes

Re: Pro-E (Creo) Surfacing Resources?

Postby Alexander_Cantoni » February 25th, 2016, 10:31 am


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I'll toss my opinion in as well. Take a class at Design Engine will get you up to speed quickly. I'm an Industrial Designer from Purdue Univeristy now located on the east coast. Back in the day i made the switch from Rhino to Pro-E with a 4 week intensive class at Design Engine. I'm still not totally ready to call it Creo yet. I'm still mad that the change over broke all my shortcuts and macros. But I haven't used Creo much as i was more useful to my last company using Solid Works since we had so few clients that were still using Creo. I used to use them interchangeably according to which client or which tools i needed. They have steadily moved closer to each other by expanding their tools to the point where for my needs either would be fine but i'm primarily a Solid Works user now as that works best for my budget. Regardless the classes on offer at Design Engine will teach you the tools but also help you think about 3d modeling in ways that will help with any software should you transition to others in the future. Its all always changing.

Alex

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