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mhurley60
 
Posts: 1
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 10:54 pm
This digital reader would feature a leather or cardboard (hardcover) front and back with a flexible spine to give the device a ‘real’ book feel. Keeping a similar feel and texture to a paper book, the cover can acquire traits like bent corners; it can age, get stained or be marked up. This will help traditional readers enjoy reading an electronic book. Inside the covers would be two thin touch screens on each side, allowing a traditional ‘page-to-page’ reading style. With the two screens laid out like a traditional paper book, it can be folded and read similar to the way a real book can be folded to suit different reading positions or comforts. Plastic housing surrounding the screens would be minimal and as subtle as possible. The key is to bring as little attention as possible to the technology involved in the device while still enhancing the reading experience.

A simple interface would contain a home screen that let users browse through their library, continue reading their current book where it was last bookmarked and shop for new titles. To keep a less digital feel to this reading experience, when the device is picked up to continue a book, it would open up to the last bookmarked page, other than a menu that would allow you to chose to keep reading. A home button as well as ‘turn page back’ and ‘turn page forward’ buttons would be found on the housing of the internal screens. Users could also turn pages by swiping their fingers on the corners of the page. Other features would include a USB port for charging, small speakers for book reading and a headphone jack.

The book would use both an internal library (memory) to store books (possibly 100 titles) as well as feature SD card slots bought in store like a regular book. The cards would come in a unique packaging, (possible a recycled cardboard/paper booklet) a little smaller than your average paper book. This is what would be displayed in the user’s home library. The cover art on the front, brief summary in the back, the packaging would wear like a real book and could be shared similar to a real paper book. Utilizing the compact nature of an SD card, companies could begin to sell and create unique and popular collector’s edition e-book packages featuring more than one title. Examples: A Stephen King collector’s edition featuring 10 of his most popular titles on 5 SD cards in a collector’s package, or a collection of children’s novels all in the same booklet for a cheaper price. Some of these special offers could feature added material such as literature related to the books topic, video interviews with the author and possibly the books movie trailer.

Using an online store and social networking people can buy sell and donate e-books. Similar to some mp3 stores, books could be bought once and be shared to friends and family to be read on their e-reader a maximum number of times. People could create their own networks with their family, friends or coworkers that allows them to share or view other peoples libraries, see who’s reading what, what books are being bought among friends, view comments or reviews, and even recommend a friend to read a newly purchased book.
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e-reader scan01.jpg
e-reader scan02.jpg


Giantpeanut
 
Posts: 1
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 7:49 pm
Biblio - File

The most basic problem with digital readers is that people who love books don't love them. They are cold, they dont smell like old paper, you cant fold them over while you are reading in bed. The answer is not to change the digital reader to meet an audience that already loves books, but to market a digital reader to an audience that would love to have a smaller easier to use version of what already exists.

The perfect answer was to design a simple digital reader for students. The design i have included is grade school and middle school. The Biblio-File is small, easily fits in a backpack, and can hold all of the information contained in a Math Textbook, History Textbook, Biology Textbook, or any other large heavy book that is the bane of a young students existence.

The Biblio-File is designed to have a video game style interface and to easily fit into a schoolbag. You can use the buttons for the menu, to shrink and enlarge the text, and scroll through the pages (there would also be a touch screen version for teenagers/college students). A USB cable outlet has been designed into the Biblio-File so that you can connect to your home computer (no matter how old it is) and charge the unit from your home computer or from a plug. You can also update your textbooks from year to year cutting the cost and the waste of reprinting college textbooks every year. There is no WiFi connection, so that teachers can use the device in class without having to worry about students browsing the internet or playing games.
Attachments
Bibliofile 1.jpg
Elizabeth New


vinishree
 
Posts: 3
Joined: July 12th, 2007, 1:59 am
Location: India
D-Book_1.jpg
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D-Book_12.jpg
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vinishree

ebook Origami

Postby yanying » October 13th, 2009, 11:15 am

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yanying
 
Posts: 3
Joined: December 10th, 2007, 2:05 pm
---

Designed by Huang Yanying
Product Design major
School of Art, Design & Media
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

---

Digital reading devices are increasingly being conceptualized and developed as a single repository of many books. A book used to be a physical entity with its own book cover treatment, appearance and visual identity. Now a book in a digital reader is a collection of immaterial text, with no physical or tactile attributes to differentiate it from other books.

Every book is different. What current digital book readers take away from the reading experience is the unique physical and visual identity of each book. They take away the book's capability to project outside of what is inside.

I am proposing the application of the folding origami concept to digital books.

A “book” will be a single sheet of shape memory electronic paper that can be pre-programmed to remember one (or several) folded origami shapes. A book is presented in an origami shape that is relevant to its contents. When a user takes a book to read it, it will unfold automatically into a flat reading digital screen. When the e-book is not needed, it will revert back to its folded origami shape.

The book can further track when the user has paused his/her reading and update its origami form or visuals to reflect the story's progress.

A book will no longer be a restrictive flat functional box, but a changeable form that is rich in nuances and interaction with its user. Publishers and authors can now draw on the rich tradition and different cultural aspects of paper folding to add another dimension to their storytelling.

On a personal note, I feel much of what is cultural and human is in danger of being unwittingly lost with the mass adoption of designs that (more frequently than not) pursue the rational and the functional over what is meaningful. Yet, it is these cultural behaviors and human rituals that make our interaction with the world richer. While we can't turn back time and reject the march of technology, it is still possible to combine the old and the new, so what is worth preserving is not lost.

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Last edited by yanying on October 14th, 2009, 4:44 am, edited 2 times in total.
Thoughts. Musings. Book & web snippets about product design.
http://product.yanyingdesign.com/


Nick_Sardar
 
Posts: 1
Joined: September 25th, 2009, 8:04 am
The electronic book will likely become a media platform which supports more than just downloadable books.
The following sketches illustrate my ideation around how the e-book can provide a rich experience in various environments.
Attachments
E-Book CAD.JPG
E-Book CAD.JPG (44.56 KiB) Viewed 3361 times
Core77 2.jpg
Core77 1.jpg

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sgmitch
 
Posts: 1
Joined: October 13th, 2009, 1:22 am
Separating the Book's Brain from Its Body

Paper books are cheap and variable—they can be precious or disposable, sturdy or fragile, beautiful or utilitarian. The Kindle and other e-books, on the other hand, contain electronics that are capable of downloading and storing content, saving mark-up, and negotiating content rights, electronics that are inherently expensive and precious. So I propose separating the smart (and expensive) part of digital reading from the manipulated artifact.

Sensual
Paper books are sensual and kinesthetic experiences, but the experience is different from book to book. Paperbacks are light and soft, with pulpy and fragile pages. Hardcover design books are heavy and hard, with thick, glossy pages. Kids books sometimes have cardboard pages. Magazines can be rolled, newspapers folded, and reference books are made to stand on shelves. Digital reading in the future will need to provide the same kind of varied experiences that support the differing motivations, settings, and content of books.

The book brain can be a device with much stronger personal ownership than the book body. It is a piece of core personal electronics like the mobile phone, that you always carry with you, protect, and don't loan to other people. The brain broadcasts the current text to display (via Bluetooth or some similar wireless technology) to the book body, which contains the bare minimum of technology to display the text, transmit notes back to the brain device, and support the page turn gesture.

Paper books do all have a few things in common despite their differences—pages that turn and can be marked, written on, and torn. All book bodies would support the SAME page turn gesture, a diagonal swipe. All book bodies would support marking (thumbing) a page, and most would support annotating. All marking and annotating would be transmitted to the brain device and saved, so it could appear on whichever body you are currently using.

Varied Modes
One of the benefits of digital reading is the environmental benefit of not needing a physical book for every story, but we will probably still need different physical artifacts for our different modes of reading. You could have a large, glossy, and flat body for the coffee-table top. For reading while traveling or on public transportation you could have a cheap and compact book body that might not support notes, but that you wouldn't be heartbroken if you lost. You could have a backlit, soft cover book body for reading in bed. You could have a sturdy, rubber-edged, and easy to hold book body for your kids.

Your personal book brain device travels with you for all of your personal modes of reading. It can be worn, or carried in a pocket or purse, or placed on the nightstand. A larger home library brain device could live on a shelf in your home, and certain book bodies could be synced to a specific title—like books on display or reference books. Your personal device can borrow or add book data to the home library device. Some book bodies allow the personal device to be docked to the body, reuniting the body and brain of the book, for example for kids who might have a harder time understanding the separation.

Ecosystem
The manufacture and design of the brain devices would be constrained to a single standard to maximize compatibility (like an API), but the marketplace for design and construction of book bodies and accessories would be open (like apps). This way the book bodies could meet varying demands, and improve as the available e-paper and haptics technologies improve and become affordable.

Book data would be available for purchase and download from online sellers. Brick and mortar booksellers could offer instant downloads to your device, and if you don't have your device with you, they can text you a code to access the content when you are able to download it. They could also sell the different types of bodies—airport bookshops could sell replacement flimsy bodies, mall bookstores could sell fancy and decorative book bodies. You could also buy special collector's packages for content that is emotionally resonant—Twilight or Harry Potter custom book bodies with the complete series text, for example.

Social
You could pass a book to a friend, complete with any notes you've added, simply by bumping your device with theirs. This would remove the book from your device and add it to theirs, just like handing over your paper copy which is part of the precious and yet transient quality of books. This also helps with rights management and preserves the timeless tradition of asking for your copy back. You can also email them your copy, or burn it to a 'blank' book body (a very cheap digital reader body that imprints once with text and then cannot be re-imprinted, like CDs).

If multiple people are broadcasting the same book in the vicinity of a book body, it displays markup from both devices. This way you can mark up a book at home, then view together with someone and see your combined notes. This would also enable serendipitous discovery of someone nearby reading the same text as you.

The device itself can be worn (showing the title you are currently reading) as an identity display, and the book body you carry will say a lot about you. Do you carry a sleek and white book body? Do you carry a Twilight book body? Do you carry an ultra-tiny or a large-format book body? Do you carry it in your pocket or in your briefcase? Additionally, smart clothing and accessories like book bags could read and display the title of the book currently being broadcast by your device.


(Final thought: I also find some romance in the idea of these book bodies coming to life with content as you approach them. They are utilitarian and physical, but become rich with seductive stories and imagination through their interaction with you.)
Attachments
reading.jpg


Jason Meyer Design
 
Posts: 1
Joined: October 13th, 2009, 1:39 pm
My concept uses plastic plates as the "book" which contain the text on a solid state memory chip, and a "reader" which contains the processor, memory, sensors for interface, and the projector for the display. Using plastic plate books accomplishes several things. First is makes the books durable and cheap to manufacture. Second it makes it easy to share, loan, trade, or sell your books. Once a book is placed in the reader it is stored in memory until the book is finished, this allows sharing without copy write issues as well as the ability to carry multiple books at a time. With the use of a digital-book shelf users can also display their book collection as they would with printed books. The reader comes with a "blank book" for general use, like for downloaded books or if you don't want to show what you’re reading. It uses a simple gesture interface. Flicking your finger down on the corner advances the book one page, flicking your finger up brings you to the previous page. This simple gesture keeps the classic feel of turning pages in a book. Users can also bookmark pages. These are represented by tabs on the top of the page, allowing you to quickly switch between non-consecutive pages. A stylus is also provided for taking notes and making comments. The reader would have wireless capabilities to allow downloading of new material. This would also open up a whole world of social reading possibilities. The reader could automatically update your facebook or twitter status when you finish a book complete with your comments. Users could use it to get or give recommendations for new books or to look up words or phrases they are not familiar with. I believe this concept brings together the best of both the printed and digital reading experiences
Future of Reading.jpg

The Page_Adaptive Delivery Device

Postby sliao » October 13th, 2009, 10:49 pm


sliao
 
Posts: 1
Joined: October 13th, 2009, 10:29 pm
Design by, Manny Darden, Jae Yeop Kim & Scott Liao
Graduate Candidates, Media Design Program
Art Center College of Design

The Page
Adaptive Delivery Device

One of the major benefits of having gadgets is that it constantly connects us to the world and what's happening in it. Though these technological devices have allowed us to interact with data from anywhere we choose, there isn't a unique delivery system for the information they’re delivering especially when “news” is concerned. The printed versions of newspapers can offer mobility, much like a device, but access to content can be cumbersome in certain reading situations. How do we combine the affordances of print and online versions of news and translate that hybrid into a single device? A medium that conforms to human practices and the varied scenarios of accessing news.


THEME
A device that truly considers the daily scenarios of our audience as they engage with news content.

ATTITUDE
Familiar, Classic, Adaptive.


CONCEPT
The first question we ask is, "what if there was a device that inherited all the affordances of print, and screen based news formats." Our goal is to design a flex­ible grid system that attacks this question. The user is presented information in an aesthetic which is much more inline with print but then can navigate through the content to access different sections and objects of the paper which is a behavior accustom to online practices. The second question we ask is, “what if the device is adaptive to the activity or environment of the user while he or she is immersed with the content?” The strategy we have set forth is to allow the form of the device to be physically manipulated using the practice of folding to harmonize with the situation in which the user is engaged.
Attachments
Scenario_mark_01.jpg
Scenario_In Transit
Scenario_mark_02.jpg
Scenario_Dining
Scenario_mark_03.jpg
Scenario_Video

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neilsondesign
step two
step two
 
Posts: 54
Joined: October 13th, 2009, 9:07 am
Design by, Judy Bacalso
Industrial Design Program UPVCC
University of the Philippines

Design brief:

OPOB '09 is a ''one page, one book'' concept designed to make reading more essential and dynamic. It is made more simple and easy to use digital reading device where it has a special LCD system made to improvised technical features that contains all the information of a 1 Book. Attached on its left side is the special system manipulating all the information and settings to help guide the readers.

This ''one page, one book'' concept contains more than just an information which has more digital features such as; moving images/pictures, topic trailers/Videos/Graphics, Zooming Letters/ Resizing letters for eye-problem users, Language translators/ Audio translators, Music player, Games/Word puzzles, Calendar and time Display updates, and a special Headset connector. A flexible, water-proof, solar/power charging and a space saving device for maintenance.

Readers can easily compile all the page books together in one cover by attaching and connecting them with the use of its magnetic system ( another way to conserve space in all storage areas ). It can be also removed from the compiled Pages and can be easily placed anywhere you go ( bookmarks can also be useful in case the readers wants to find the desired page book to use ). For social purposes, ''one page, one book'' can be easily share to other people and other page books. Readers will have to connect the number of desired page books with the use of its own system settings to duplicate or copy any desired topic or information they want to share.


By: Judyli89 UPVCC
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Judy bacalso.JPG

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neilsondesign
step two
step two
 
Posts: 54
Joined: October 13th, 2009, 9:07 am
Design by, Siegfred Jorge
Industrial Design Program UPVCC
University of the Philippines
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neilsondesign
step two
step two
 
Posts: 54
Joined: October 13th, 2009, 9:07 am
Design by, Bea Joyce Enmil
Industrial Design Program UPVCC
University of the Philippines

"Read While you Write"

reading for the future is quite a vast subject to tackle with. There are so many ideas that may pop out of one's mind. For we may not really know the future we can just guess.

The design that I have come up with is a book contained in a highlighter. However, instead of its normal function, which is highlighting stuff on paper, it produces not only colorful lines but rather words from a book. Such words are shown using the author's own penmanship. So, the reader not only reads the book he likes, but can also see the real penmanship of the author. Thus, reading while writing or highlighting while reading.

This gadget can be used anywhere anytime as long as there is something that the reader can write on with. Plus, it is so handy. One can carry it anywhere as a key chain. So wherever the reader goes he can read the book he wants.

The consumers can purchase this product through bookstores in line with other readable materials. He/she just needs to find the title that he/she wants.

This gadget caters the usual senses used in reading a present book. If the reader wants to flip pages then he/she can just write on as many papers as he/she wants. For I've learned that flipping pages gives a fulfilling feeling to a reader.

The reading experience can be shared to others through sharing gadgets or the paper that was used by the reader.
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neilsondesign
step two
step two
 
Posts: 54
Joined: October 13th, 2009, 9:07 am
Design by, Caryl Fehazel Faunillan
Industrial Design Program UPVCC
University of the Philippines

“D Reader”

Reading books wouldn’t be that ordinary in the future. With the advancements in technology, the digital world would be far imaginable than these days.. Like this concept of having a digital book. From all the researches I made, I came up with this idea and called this the “D Reader” which means “digital reader”.

The “D Reader” is Wifi- ready and is bluetooth equipped with voice recorder and bluetooth- enabled headset. It enables one to the desired change fonts. It has an adjuster for lights to suit the user’s need.

Moreover, the “D Reader” has the following additional features:

* speakers for family gatherings;
* It can be connected to a printer for sharing. It also has a document viewer and enables one to publish documents;
* Markers for identity (click the command “underline”);
* One can record personal memories which could be related in the readings (e.g. annotations);
* One can directly go to the desired spot once by bookmarking it;
* One can browse the available books and purchase it online;
* For every book there is a specific code. Once the code has been entered, the readings will automatically flash on the screen;
* Before purchasing, one already has the idea about the book if it is beautiful or not since one can rate it, discuss, recommend, share, tag. (Environment) – people can come together to talk about their books;
* Can display a user’s most readable books and enable people to share their favorite books.
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Caryl Fehazel Faunillan.jpg
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neilsondesign
step two
step two
 
Posts: 54
Joined: October 13th, 2009, 9:07 am
Design by, Elsy Jean Borja
Industrial Design Program UPVCC
University of the Philippines
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neilsondesign
step two
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Posts: 54
Joined: October 13th, 2009, 9:07 am
Design by, jouanesa lopez
Industrial Design Program UPVCC
University of the Philippines
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zama
 
Posts: 5
Joined: March 19th, 2008, 11:33 am
Location: Spain
Clipbook is a digital reading system based on a picoprojector (tiny projector) that projects the text on an independent screen sheet.
The picoprojector consist of several spots in a linear way to take in the whole sheet, which can has various sizes, thick and proportions. The high luminosity led system allows nice contrast in high light conditions.
The picoprojector works as a dock, clipping on the support and reading the built in memory on it. The memory contains the dimensions data to focus the projector and from one to dozens of books.
The support sheet has a smooth and whitish projection surface, but the rest could be very simple or luxurious, thick or thin, light or heavy, cold or warm touch, texturized, with smell, graphic, …depending on the book or edition.
Clipbook can work independently over any support (p.e. a table) with a small internal memory and manual focus.
The interface is gestual, working by means of a camera that scans hand movements.

Sensual
Customizable screen sheet.
Gestual interface.

SocialAs easy to pass and share as a physical book (you only have to pass the sheet).

Modes/Rituals
Very adaptable to any situation.
Different supports for different editions for different situations.
Plug the sheet and read.
Group reading with big format.

Ecosystem

Plenty of opportunities thanks to independent sheet system
Attachments
clipbook_01.jpg
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clipbook_02.jpg
clipbook_02.jpg (87.43 KiB) Viewed 3568 times

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