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Re: CAD program in Toy Design

Postby design-engine » November 20th, 2010, 1:22 pm

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anyone use the sensible products for toy design? i know matel and fisher-price use the farro arm for the wood detail on their plastic toys. http://www.sensible-products.com/
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Re: CAD program in Toy Design

Postby tempurabacon » November 20th, 2010, 10:10 pm


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I've never used Rhino in an actual project but I've seen models done in it. I use Solidworks and its ideal because its a parametric modeler. Also depends on the toys your designing. I do alot of diecast vehicles and preschool toys so I can get by with SW. Rhino would be better for figures though. I like the cage that Rhino has and the way other polygon modelers work and wish there was a way solidworks could be more like that. But for designing mechanism with gear trains, cams, levers etc SW is the way to go plus your cost package drawings are a snap (overalls, exploded/cross sections)- not sure if Rhino has that feature-

Learning both would be a great way to go--

joe

Re: CAD program in Toy Design

Postby sam hagger » November 21st, 2010, 4:13 pm

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design-engine wrote:anyone use the sensible products for toy design? i know matel and fisher-price use the farro arm for the wood detail on their plastic toys. http://www.sensible-products.com/


I think you've got that link wrong, I'm assuming you mean SensAble's Freeform?

We use a combination of Freeform and Solidworks data in our toy development.

More in line with the OP though, we often issue a range of data to our clients and vendors, including native Solidworks files, Illustrator elevations as well as 1:1 foam models and sketched elevations.

Re: CAD program in Toy Design

Postby nxakt » November 22nd, 2010, 5:08 am

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We use real clay models, laser digitize, then import into Rhino3D for surfacing. Virtual, onscreen, clay with virtual surface "feel" through simulation, I can imagine the bad disconnect from the real world form. The singular advantage, no clay chips to clean up. I have seen Rapidform surfaced models, models built in Solidworks, models built in Catia, I prefer the Rhino3D result.

I have used Rhino for the past ten-twelve years to build free form and technical products, shoe lasts, blow molded toys, EPS sculpted bike helmets, snowboard bindings. If you know what you are building, Rhino will build it just fine, if there are manufacturing restriction that you know of, such as mold parting lines, Rhino3D will work great. If you need things such as draft angles done automatically, better to use the more technical, restrictive modelers like SolidWorks, or import into for technical interior work.

Re: CAD program in Toy Design

Postby idguy88 » November 23rd, 2010, 6:14 pm

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I was in a similar situation and had to beg for Rhino about 8 years ago to cut down on drafting time (can auto generate views, albeit you might have to clean them up and reconnect lines sometimes) and to use photo real views to communicate with factories . I had a hard time learning it and still am always learning it but I am probably older than you and come from a time when we did not learn on computers in school and had to learn AutoCAD 12 and Adobe and windows programs on my first job and at night on my own.

I have found from reading that the program can model anything, its just the user that is the limitation and time.
I've found that obviously, not all 3D forms are created with the same ease and Rhino is very specific about how you close off shapes to make them a watertight solid, also their boolean tools are very finnickey (they don't like coincident planes and borders). At my level, I am very careful what I try to model. For example I would not be able to model a realistic, muscle-bound superhero with a cape - do you use something like Z-Brush for that?. I am not sure what is best for that sort of stuff. But all in all for product-like shapes, the program makes me look good, but I've had to put a lot of time and $1200 into two training courses and constant referencing manuals to get there. If your dept. is budget concious, use rhino, it is the highest performance, lowest cost equation. To date there are now maintenance, subscription fees, buy it once, upgrade when you want. It's Flamingo renderer is good, but for another $250. got better with FlamingoNXT. One of the bigger disappointments for me was their was no shelling command, but in 5.0 they have this - it is beta now. THere are also a lot of plug-in now too to do stress analysis and it seems someone is always coming out with plugins.

I am in the same boat, what I really want to use Solidworks because most of the jobs I see require it over Rhino but I can't afford it and the learning curve I hear is steep. I think you concern is valid where you think your employer may balk if your not productive with SW after spending so much on it, unless you can sell it to them where your sent for training and explain it is powerful but commands a bit of training.

Re: CAD program in Toy Design

Postby westhomas » December 28th, 2010, 3:02 pm


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We use Solidworks in our design office, it is the best way to communicate with our engineers in HK. Rhino is great for surfacing, but it has to be converted in the tooling process.

I recommend trying to get a seat of Solidworks or Pro/E. The draft, shell, and other mold-making features are unbeatable. For more organic products (figurals, etc.) we use our sculptors.

Re: CAD program in Toy Design

Postby Whippy » January 30th, 2011, 7:29 am

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So do most other people use CAD in toy design? We outsource all of ours, at first I thought this strange as there feels like a lack of control. But due to the volume of projects running simultaneously and a very quick turnaround it makes sense for us to brief this out , I don't think we would be able to juggle it in house without another member of staff. We use a mixture of Solidworks or Freeform, UK and HK based, depending on the product. I do miss using CAD and often think it would be good to brief out the main CAD and then tweak in house, it can often involve a lot of back and forth, tending to make minor alterations at tool start.

Re: CAD program in Toy Design

Postby idguy88 » January 30th, 2011, 7:34 pm

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Can you do interior room renders with natural sun with Bunkspeed?

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