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yo
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It depends on how an organization sees the discipline. Is it value add or completing a task? A critical part of product definition or A side styling? A way the organization differentiates itself from the competition, or hey punk CAD this up?

As much as I like diving into the A side styling, it is gravy on the goose as they say.... no goose? Not interested. I want to play a key role in what the product is, what it does, who it is for, how it is made. Then the topical styling part is easy. If you are handed a festering turd of a product concept and mechanical layout there isn't much you can do. This is why car sketches always look hot but the end result is often a lumpy mess. The design function is divorced and in direct conflict from the part of the company that decides what it is, who it is for, and the mechanical layout. Atom smashing these disparate points of view together is rarely pleasant nor effective.


idainc
 
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yo wrote:It depends on how an organization sees the discipline. Is it value add or completing a task? A critical part of product definition or A side styling? A way the organization differentiates itself from the competition, or hey punk CAD this up?

As much as I like diving into the A side styling, it is gravy on the goose as they say.... no goose? Not interested. I want to play a key role in what the product is, what it does, who it is for, how it is made. Then the topical styling part is easy. If you are handed a festering turd of a product concept and mechanical layout there isn't much you can do. This is why car sketches always look hot but the end result is often a lumpy mess. The design function is divorced and in direct conflict from the part of the company that decides what it is, who it is for, and the mechanical layout. Atom smashing these disparate points of view together is rarely pleasant nor effective.



Adding to this, the people doing the hiring at this level aren’t designers. They are almost universally deliverable oriented. In school, we all made our own models and to a degree did simple graphics as a part of the curriculum.

The people doing the hiring now see designers as a deliverable source only and really don’t have nearly the appreciation of the subtleties and logic that goes behind a product. Now you’ll see job requirements that include CS6, Auto CAD, Catia, ProE, all manner of rendering and animation programs, product packaging and provide “help” on advertising digital 2D sketching, physical modelmaking and the list goes on.

ID may not have done itself a favor by being all things to all people and jacks of all trades and masters of none.

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yo
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I think it can be like that in some companies but I would not generalize this to all.

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