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slippyfish
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I just submitted a proposal, selling "design solutions" rather than hours. Funny/strange/sad how designers of all stripes will undervalue their work, or be susceptible to others devaluing their work. I didn't fall into this scheme, this time. Broke out the project into four phases with 'a la carte' pricing, but made sure that the first two phases were more or less mandatory in order to get the project completed. The last phase was CAD which would be estimated and budgeted on an hourly basis rather than a lump sum. As a manager now I have direct insight into how long projects take even the most efficient designers, and the sad truth is that a lot of freelancers are making very little compared to where they should be.

However - we shall see what the potential client says in return. In which case, the lunchbreath graphic rule shall apply:

lunchbreath_acceptable-design-projects.jpg
lunchbreath_acceptable-design-projects.jpg (40.2 KiB) Viewed 3638 times
“Traveling through hyperspace isn't like dusting crops, boy."

http://www.superformer.com
http://www.coroflot.com/skhid

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yo
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I came across this video a few weeks ago, and then I lost it. Luckily it resurfaced on Facebook. I cannot for the life of me find a youtube link, but this is really good and summa up my approach to pricing. You need to know what your hourly rate and speed are to create a proposal, but after that I look at it like this:
https://www.facebook.com/theFuturisHere ... 327592890/

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yo
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Found it:


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louis leblanc
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yo wrote:Found it:



The Futur (that youtube channel) has a bunch of other great resources and videos as well!

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slippyfish
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Anyone have any experience/tips on budgeting the CAD portion of a project? Where despite best intentions, the full extent of the 3D problem solving can't be fully understood until you are elbows-deep in a model?

My example is that I've completed the first two flat-rate phases of a project (initial research and scoping, and narrowed-down to two solutions worked out in sketches and AI). I now need to estimate the CAD portion.

My hypothesis is that I still should follow the rationale of the first phases and hope to get 'close'...its either that or start with an estimate and then bill it hourly with a "not to exceed" fee...which more or less amounts to the same thing.
“Traveling through hyperspace isn't like dusting crops, boy."

http://www.superformer.com
http://www.coroflot.com/skhid


iab
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yo wrote:Found it:


A very good reference to know how to speak to your audience. Speak in their terms. Similar to the "What was your most successful product" thread.

He did take some liberties with GP. Although he did correct himself in one case.


MattyK
 
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Found it:


Awesome video, absolutely brilliant. And a great way of thinking bigger.

"You guys sell what you can do. I sell what the world can do."


MattyK
 
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Anyone have any experience/tips on budgeting the CAD portion of a project? Where despite best intentions, the full extent of the 3D problem solving can't be fully understood until you are elbows-deep in a model?


Wondering the same thing.

In that video above, has anybody tried those tactics for pricing a CAD job?

Or what other approaches have worked well?

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