Re: Entry Level Salary Rates

Postby bcpid » July 21st, 2011, 11:16 pm


bcpid
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Posts: 328
Joined: March 20th, 2004, 8:26 pm
$35k is a weak starting salary 5 years ago. It doesn't do you any good to dig a salary expectations hole.

In a recent Yale study, that followed 1979-1989 college graduates on a career path, it was noted that for each percent increase in unemployment, the initial salary of new entrants into the work force with college graduate degrees fell approximately 7%. Some graduates had nearly 25% lower income in their 1st year of work, than those who graduated in better economic times. The lower initial income is only one aspect. The study found that even as much as 17 years later, their lower incomes persisted, and some were making as much as 10% less than their counterparts. Over the course of their career, the income difference could be nearly $100,000 between those with college graduate degrees getting a job in recession times and grads getting a job in boom times. The study found the lower paid grads in mid career were less likely to be in a prestigious career, more likely to stay in their job, and therefore see less likely to enjoy significant income increases. This raises the possibility that people with college graduate degrees who start in a low level, low paying job, may be viewed as having lower potential by employers when they seek other jobs.

Think hard before you decide you aren't worth it.

Re: Entry Level Salary Rates

Postby [][]M[][] » July 23rd, 2011, 4:05 pm


[][]M[][]
 
Posts: 8
Joined: December 2nd, 2009, 3:40 pm
How would one go about asking for fair market value in negotiating an entry level ID salary? Is the onus on the interviewer or interviewee to supply that data?

Re: Entry Level Salary Rates

Postby bcpid » July 23rd, 2011, 7:53 pm


bcpid
step four
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Posts: 328
Joined: March 20th, 2004, 8:26 pm
It's on both of you. The employer's HR department needs to have some sense of what constitutes a reasonable offer so they aren't a) overspending, or b) wasting everyone's time by lowballing applicants. It's on you to research Bureau of Labor Statistics data, Coroflot salary survey, Salary.com, and Glassdoor data to establish what you can reasonably ask for based on the job title, your experience level, the the employer organization's characteristics, and the location of the job.

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