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VR Sketching tech

Postby AndyMc » October 5th, 2016, 8:26 pm

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Has anyone seen this vr sketching tech? Not sure how functional it would be for actual work but I'd love to play with it!



Full article:
http://www.dezeen.com/2016/09/30/gravit ... n-mid-air/

Re: VR Sketching tech

Postby Jon_Cervin » October 6th, 2016, 6:11 am


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We have a vive and Rift here with some sketching programs. The Google one is really fun to mess around with. However, it is really difficult to get straight lines or anything that doesnt look like a 7 year old made it. It is amazing how much more difficult sketching becomes when you add in another dimension. However, like basic sketching, I think that with enough time you could get decent at it. Shoulder fatigue is something that is fairly common after about 10 minutes as well. I am curios as to how they are outputting this into a CAD file. The technology is going to have to develop a certain interpolation to straighten or fix rough edges and fill in surfaces.

Re: VR Sketching tech

Postby Cyberdemon » October 6th, 2016, 7:58 am

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Tilt Brush (the google) equivalent is amazing, and I think we're going to see more tools like this evolve over time, but the use cases for visualization will be more obvious up front than sketching. Car designers and other professions have been using VR/CAVE/MR systems for a while now to visualize large scale objects which are too difficult to see on a piece of paper. Likewise, architectural visualization will be completely replaced by VR within the next several years IMO. Being able to understand a space in 3D far outweighs the low barrier to entry.

The ability to sketch in 3D is really cool, but obviously as a profession we've spent decades evolving the "Art" which is ID sketching. ID sketching is about communication, and working in 3D allows you do do some really interesting things in terms of helping you to understand space, but unless someone straps on your headset and looks at it, the 2D representation you see in these videos is never quite enough.

As far as outputting to CAD, everything you see rendered is polygon geometry, probably based on the 3D Bezier curves you draw with the wands. So it's automatically going to be water tight when it comes to sending to a 3D printer.

If you haven't had a chance to play with Tiltbrush, try to scour your networks for someone who has a Vive. I spent about 30 minutes Giggling the first time I drew a shitty VW beetle in 3D.

Re: VR Sketching tech

Postby gmay3able » October 6th, 2016, 11:03 am

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I'm really excited to try this someday. It would be a great office brainstorming tool that would let you get up and take a break from seated sketching and mix it up a little by moving around.

It would be so cool to have a group of designers create a virtual space of sculpted ideas and rough concepts throughout the week and be able to check in periodically and be able to walk around all the concepts and see them grow and evolve over time.

Re: VR Sketching tech

Postby AndyMc » October 26th, 2016, 4:37 am

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Cyberdemon wrote:If you haven't had a chance to play with Tiltbrush, try to scour your networks for someone who has a Vive. I spent about 30 minutes Giggling the first time I drew a shitty VW beetle in 3D.


I just checked out the video on their website. Wow!

I'd love to get my hands on one to play with. The only other VR tech I've experienced was classmate simulating a full scale train interior to check out passenger flow with different seat/door configs, but that was a completely different approach to this.

Now to try to find somewhere that might have something similar in Australia!


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