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Re: ID sketching frustrations.

PostPosted: June 29th, 2016, 7:55 am
by IDAL
yo wrote: I've always been able to sketch pretty freely, but my car sketches were lazy. I made a commitment to get really good at car sketching over the last 12 months. I think the differences have been pretty dramatic.... but it takes commitment. In the past I'd just do a car doodle and be happy with it. Now I doodle, I iterate, I overlay 5 times, I start over again, I take a break for a day and come back to it... it is more of a labor, but I'm happier with the result.


I think that's the key, not just ''sketching'' but doing it with a purpose. Taking a bit of time, analyze the result and refine it. Just sketching with a purpose will improve your skills, but I think doing it this way you'll also improve at designing.

At our company we have a good balance between sketching/cad/prototyping, definitely you can see how your skills improve on all levels. I particularly enjoy sketching the most, so I try to spend some time sketching at home as well. For me the key is finding a sketch I really like on tumblr or pinterest and trying to replicate that style. Cars and shoes are fun to sketch because you can do pretty much whatever you want and there are tons of styles and examples out there.

Re: ID sketching frustrations.

PostPosted: July 5th, 2016, 2:14 am
by ralphzoontjens
About how long did it take you to really dial sketching down?
For me it is different because I had always been drawing as a kid, and I intuitively started rendering objects in various materials.
So I had an advantage. To turn that into a professional ability to create design concept sketches using digital media I would say has taken me about 500 hours. Practice, repetition and refining your imagination skills are key.

Do you feel like you have to learn to draw each object or can you just draw any object at any time?
It is rather the aesthetic qualities I have to learn for new projects. For very organic, complex design languages it takes me some time to get a grip on how they 'work' spatially. When you have mastered enough sketching ingredients it allows you in the end to draw anything.

Rendering, How long did it take you to learn? Marker? Digital?
I still haven't mastered marker rendering very well as I stepped to digital quite soon, driven by the company I was working at. And I am fine with that even though for some sketches markers work much nicer. Learning to decently render shadows and materials as well as developing my own style has taken about 200 hours.

Does anyone else get freaking frustrated on insta by looking at those super amazing digital renderings some godlike automotive designers are producing these days? Seriously.
I enjoy looking at those a lot and learn from them. I am also aware of the pitfall of overrendering or overdesigning - in the end it is about the quality of the entire project and sketching is only one way of developing a design.

Rate the importance each, Digital and Manual Sketching. Which do you find more difficult?

Re: ID sketching frustrations.

PostPosted: July 13th, 2016, 4:43 pm
by CeeLee
Does anyone have recommendations of Instagram accounts to follow that have great ID sketches? Perhaps some of the g0d-like and some of the more down to earth.

Re: ID sketching frustrations.

PostPosted: July 13th, 2016, 6:14 pm
by blaster701
Lots of good posts. It boils down to drawing every day. Yo mentioned underlays and overlays on the previous page. Tracing over your own work, or a CAD image or a picture is always good. The more you draw the better. Ask for people to look at your work...most are happy to give you feedback. Follow people on Instagram. I have learned/been inspired all the time from people I follow.

People ask me how I sketch on Canson/construction paper in pen without an underlay....the answer is simple, I have done tons and tons of underlays.

I am also a believer in CAD and Sketching as partners. Each pushes the other and helps improve the "other side of the coin".

Re: ID sketching frustrations.

PostPosted: July 18th, 2016, 7:21 am
by sketchie105
@ceelee Here are some super sick insta accounts that I follow.

@marc_mpv
@mxrxvs
@blaster701
@reid.schlegel
@hudsonriodesign
@sketchfresh
@sketchpowers
@gaetano_crispi
@abidurchowdhury
@soyalcreative
@thesketchmonkey
@d2lo
@cardesigndaily
@alferezdesign


Just some.. Literally could go all day. Great inspiration from the above.

Cheers

Re: ID sketching frustrations.

PostPosted: July 22nd, 2016, 6:42 am
by sketchie105
Sketch happiness average. About what percentage of your completed sketches do you find successful?

Open to all.

Cheers

Re: ID sketching frustrations.

PostPosted: July 23rd, 2016, 11:51 am
by KenoLeon
sketchie105 wrote:About what percentage of your completed sketches do you find successful?


Success_rate.JPG
Success_rate.JPG (81.9 KiB) Viewed 12634 times

Re: ID sketching frustrations.

PostPosted: July 25th, 2016, 6:20 am
by sketchie105
Lol. Well put.

Re: ID sketching frustrations.

PostPosted: November 6th, 2016, 5:49 pm
by Rodrigo
sketchie105 wrote:@ceelee Here are some super sick insta accounts that I follow.

@marc_mpv
@mxrxvs
@blaster701
@reid.schlegel
@hudsonriodesign
@sketchfresh
@sketchpowers
@gaetano_crispi
@abidurchowdhury
@soyalcreative
@thesketchmonkey
@d2lo
@cardesigndaily
@alferezdesign


Just some.. Literally could go all day. Great inspiration from the above.

Cheers


dude, i just started looking for all those acounts and then realize that, minus 2 or 3, i follow all of them haha! How is your sketch now? Did you evolve like you expected?

Re: ID sketching frustrations.

PostPosted: November 7th, 2016, 6:51 am
by ralphzoontjens

Re: ID sketching frustrations.

PostPosted: November 16th, 2016, 9:11 pm
by SophieHortonJones
About how long did it take you to really dial sketching down?
When I got to university it felt like everybody could sketch... except me. Most people had done art, or a foundation year before going to university... I hadn't. I still remember really vividly the one (one of the very few) tutorials we had on sketching, where we had rulers and erasers taken off us, and spent ages sketching a matchbox, only to be told to screw up the sketch and throw it in the bin. It felt a bit harsh at the time, but it was the beginning of understanding that a sketch isn't always meant to be a masterpiece. It took me ages to catch up, and hours of practice and tips from others. I'm not really sure I've dialled sketching down, but for me the Sharpie was a revelation, it lets me get the idea down, without being too prescious about the sketch itself, and this can be really important. I tend to use sketching as a form of communication, so the Sharpie is my favourite tool!

Do you feel like you have to learn to draw each object or can you just draw any object at any time?
I don't think you can learn to draw everything... I think as soon as you develop a style (which took me a long while, but when somebody commented on me having a unique style I was pretty chuffed!), and a favourite perspective, you can draw most objects. Then move from there with perspectives and styles that suit different products (although I've found it difficult to shake off that style I spent so long trying to find...!)

Rendering, How long did it take you to learn? Marker? Digital?
This is probably my weakest suit. I'm still working on establishing a render style that doesn't take me the whole day!

Does anyone else get freaking frustrated on insta by looking at those super amazing digital renderings some godlike automotive designers are producing these days? Seriously.
I love seeing what other people are up to, it's great to see how people approach things differently, I agree though, it can be frustrating when you can't replicate it. But you never stop learning!!

Rate the importance each, Digital and Manual Sketching. Which do you find more difficult?
I think they all have their own importance, it depends what you're using it for, none are more or less important than the others, it's all about what works for you. For me, it's ideas with a Sharpie, a pile of A3 paper and headphones; then A Wacom and Sketchbook pro, or an iPad and Procreate for something more polished, more pitch presentation level. I also love digital sketching to overlay products, build CAD, sketch over the top of it to get the look / feel right, then take it back in to CAD, it helps me think.

Re: ID sketching frustrations.

PostPosted: February 1st, 2017, 5:17 am
by Adriaan_Debruyne
I copied my reply on another topic (analog vs digital) because it's also relevant for you.

to set the context:
23 years independent industrial designer (>100 clients), part-time teacher at UGent university in industrial design and design communication.
sketching and rendering: 80% digital 20% analog
personal doodling is often done on a scrap piece of paper using the nearest ballpoint I can find. Although I'm picky on the flow of the ink (more expensive doesn't mean better here).
Client projects almost always start of digital right away. For that I use mobile and desktop solutions.
Mobile: Ipad pro + pencil + concepts and procreate and sometimes sketchbook pro when I need guides like symmetry. Macbook Pro with wacom intuous medium on mischief, Ps, Sketchbook Pro
Desktop: Macbook pro with wacom cintiq 27"

I never scan analog sketches anymore to enhance them digitally. Only to archive them. I graduated in 92' (yes) in a period when digital sketching was practically non existing. I mastered the art of using markers but since I discovered wacom in 1999 I hardly touched a marker since.

A big issue for me is my workflow. Sitting in a meeting sketching on the Ipad pro, sharing that screen to a bigger screen really facilitates the decision process. If there is a physical sample or mock-up on the table it's so easy to take a picture from one of the drawing apps and draw over a dimmed layer. Or if a 3D model exists of the basic shape or components that need to be integrated I load that model into a 3D viewer, take a screenshot and use that as layer. It's all about efficiency and powerful communication. As the designer at the table it's your job to make sure everybody understands.
To do that on the spot in a qualitative way you need self-confidence. That comes from skill. To get there you need to practise (a lot).
I my ID classes the students that excel are the ones that sketch all the time. To master a tool you need to spend time on it. What's very important as a designer or creative, is that the tool doesn't slow down the flow. If I need to explore loads of options in a design (technical or styling) I always use a tool with an infinite canvas like concepts on ipad or mischief on desktop. It allows you to continue working in all directions without the need to create a new document for every idea. You also keep track of your thinking process. That's also a good communication tool.

I don't care what tool is being used by others. The efficiency and result are more important. As an ID you need to find a good balance between efficiency, communication value and artistic value. The last one should be ok and nice to look at because it can evoke emotions, but not at a cost. For instance using a strong perspective can be very dynamic and can look sporty and aggressive, but if only a really trained eye of a designer can imagine how the product really looks like, you're off limits.

to end a note on the correctness of the visuals. Train yourself and be very critical on proportions and perspective. I often see presentations with several sketches of the same concept on one page actually showing different products. If you draw multiple viewing angles of one product it should really keep the same proportions.

success and have fun!

Re: ID sketching frustrations.

PostPosted: May 15th, 2017, 11:59 am
by skinny
sketchie105 wrote:@ceelee Here are some super sick insta accounts that I follow.

@marc_mpv
@mxrxvs
@blaster701
@reid.schlegel
@hudsonriodesign
@sketchfresh
@sketchpowers
@gaetano_crispi
@abidurchowdhury
@soyalcreative
@thesketchmonkey
@d2lo
@cardesigndaily
@alferezdesign


Just some.. Literally could go all day. Great inspiration from the above.

Cheers



Nice to see one of my students on that list @hudsonriodesign. He had skills before me though, good natural talent.