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Re: Gmay3's Sketching Journey

Postby gmay3able » September 3rd, 2015, 7:54 am

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Ok so here's a fixed version of the kettle sketch from yesterday. I was going to overlay my sketch, but I thought it would be better practice to redo it completely since had some dimensional things I wanted to fix. I went easier on the line weight of the outline and just used fineliner for this sketch instead of adding any sharpie.

Here it is!

kettle2.png

Re: Gmay3's Sketching Journey

Postby gmay3able » September 3rd, 2015, 10:20 am

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Pb, thanks for the clarification. I see your point about how the purpose of the sketch drives the level of detail and techniques used. That's something I wouldn't have noticed before so thanks for pointing it out with your example.

I'll work on defining the purpose of the sketch before starting. Learning about the purpose, process, and the different levels of visual communication is something I'll work on.

Re: Gmay3's Sketching Journey

Postby pjbowers » September 3rd, 2015, 12:05 pm

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For the record...you absolutely can have a heavy background line like a thick sharpie. This technique totally works (and is necessary for sketches at the more established ideation phase). It adds line weight depth to have your sketch pop. I originally got on this topic to encourage you to "clean up" your sketchy style if that was your intent.

Re: Gmay3's Sketching Journey

Postby yo » September 3rd, 2015, 6:40 pm

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Loosen up. Don;t sketch 1 kettle. Sketch 100 kettles in 4 hours.

Re: Gmay3's Sketching Journey

Postby gmay3able » September 3rd, 2015, 10:24 pm

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Thanks yo! I hear what you're saying. Thanks for the shot of motivation.

Here's 22 kettles in 2 hours, 5 sheets of printer paper. I was shooting for a loose concept sketch style but I'm not sure how I did. I'm guessing I put too much detail in it and could have been looser so I'll keep going! Either way I'm having a blast.

combokettle1.png

kettlesheet3.png

Re: Gmay3's Sketching Journey

Postby gmay3able » September 4th, 2015, 6:29 am

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Ok here's 20 more kettles in 1 hour. 3 sheets this time.

kettlesheet6.png

kettlesheet7.png

kettlesheet8.png

Re: Gmay3's Sketching Journey

Postby yo » September 4th, 2015, 11:29 am

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already a huge improvement. Getting much looser!

Now imagine if you did exercises like this everyday for a few months. You would see huge gains. Just like going to the gym, got to put in the hours.

Re: Gmay3's Sketching Journey

Postby gmay3able » September 4th, 2015, 3:26 pm

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Thanks yo! I really needed this exercise. I'm embarrassed to say that this is the most iterations of one thing I've ever drawn. I thought I would run out of ideas but then I just kept drawing stuff and the ideas came as I sketched. This was a 'design aha moment' for me so thank you for that!

yo wrote:Now imagine if you did exercises like this everyday for a few months. You would see huge gains. Just like going to the gym, got to put in the hours.


Great idea, I'm going to do just that and I'll be sure to post them here! *flex*

Re: Gmay3's Sketching Journey

Postby FH13 » September 4th, 2015, 4:31 pm

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1) It feels like you're drawing like an engineer. You place your geometric shapes and then you merge them. Try to loosen up and do more organic shapes where the handle merges with the pot.
2) Don't try to make every single iteration different than the others, this often leads to crazy shapes. What's wrong with exploring a single form direction but focusing on the details. Often great designs are tweaks to existing forms.
3) Try drawings parts of the kettle only. Handle, lip, top, bottom...this may lead to more ideas and will give you a break from exploring the whole kettle.
4) Try drawing existing kettles. This will allow you to focus on the sketch aspect and not on the radical innovation goal. You will also see how they treat partlines, buttons, etc.
Good luck.

Re: Gmay3's Sketching Journey

Postby yo » September 4th, 2015, 7:32 pm

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gmay3able wrote:Thanks yo! I really needed this exercise. I'm embarrassed to say that this is the most iterations of one thing I've ever drawn. I thought I would run out of ideas but then I just kept drawing stuff and the ideas came as I sketched. This was a 'design aha moment' for me so thank you for that!



I always find that by the time I get to the 4th or 5th I start to run out of ideas but then I force myself to gopast it and once I get to the 15th-20th the better stuff starts coming.

I used to do little mental exercises to help channel concepts like:
What if Charles Eames designed this?
What if it could only be made of wood?
What if it was designed 50 years ago?
What if I could do whatever I wanted?
What if someone asked me to make it as crazy as possible?
What if it looked like it came from the sea?
What if it was inspired by lobster shells?

The more random the better. It pushes you into a new space.

When I was at Evo Design we were doing some early work on a project called "Foot Pod" for the Explorer Group, a now defunct advanced design group. A lot of that work went to the Nike Innovation Kitchen and informed projects like Nike Free. Anyway, the key concept evolved from "What if it flexed like a metal watch band"... go back and look at the bottom of a Nike Free shoe and it bears resemblance to a the links in a watch band.

Re: Gmay3's Sketching Journey

Postby gmay3able » September 5th, 2015, 9:10 am

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FH13, thanks for the feedback. I took your advice and studied this existing kettle and did some iterations on the parts. I definitely struggled on the handle portion. Drawing a curved cylinder in perspective was a challenge for me!

kettleparts1.png

kettleparts2.png

kettleparts3.png


yo wrote:The more random the better. It pushes you into a new space.

When I was at Evo Design we were doing some early work on a project called "Foot Pod" for the Explorer Group, a now defunct advanced design group. A lot of that work went to the Nike Innovation Kitchen and informed projects like Nike Free. Anyway, the key concept evolved from "What if it flexed like a metal watch band"... go back and look at the bottom of a Nike Free shoe and it bears resemblance to a the links in a watch band.


Thanks for those ideas yo! Thinking of different design lenses to look through when you get stuck or want to push the boundaries is a great idea, I'll definitely try that out. Wow, thanks for the sneak peek on how the Nike Free came about! I was always wondering where the idea came from and now that I look back, the similarity to a watch band really makes sense. I think that's the part of industrial design that excites me the most, allowing out of the box thinking to grow into a totally new idea.

I'll keep sketching with these things in mind, thank you guys!

Re: Gmay3's Sketching Journey

Postby gmay3able » September 6th, 2015, 2:30 pm

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I'm a music gear nerd so I wanted to switch it up today and try out some portable synthesizer concept sketches. I felt like communicating synths naturally required extra details so these took about an hour for only one sheet. I was able to simplify them a little by using sharpie to line in the black keys in 2D so I didn't have to waste time sketching a 3D keyboard.

synthsheet1.png


I had a lot of fun with these but I definitely struggled on the perspective for the middle right concept. I couldn't figure out where the ellipse minor axis should be for the knobs. I tried to work on this a little on a separate sheet, but I'm not sure if I did it correctly or not.

slanted knob.png

Re: Gmay3's Sketching Journey

Postby apowers » September 6th, 2015, 11:49 pm


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How big are you drawing? These feel really small and like they're being drawn from your fingers. Make sure your posture is good, sit up straight and sketch from your shoulder. If you're sketching on say 8.5 x 11 I would aim for 2-3 sketches per page (for an idea on a good size to start).

Sketching this small is great for thumb-nailing and finding an overall aesthetic or direction you like. Then it's best to get to larger sketches so that you can explore the detail and figure out how that thumbnail actually translates. A good exercise might be to do 40 thumbnails, pick 10 out of the thumbnails to draw larger with more detail, and then pick 1 to finalize.
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Re: Gmay3's Sketching Journey

Postby gmay3able » September 7th, 2015, 12:53 pm

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Thanks for the feedback Aaron, I've really enjoyed your design school journey thread, really inspiring stuff!

You are totally right about my posture. I hadn't realized how bad it was, I had been hunching over and that was causing my arm to have less freedom to sketch from the shoulder. You're right, that last sketch was a 8.5 x 11" sheet, so I'll keep it to 2-3 sketches for that level of detail. Thanks for that reference.

apowers wrote:Sketching this small is great for thumb-nailing and finding an overall aesthetic or direction you like. Then it's best to get to larger sketches so that you can explore the detail and figure out how that thumbnail actually translates. A good exercise might be to do 40 thumbnails, pick 10 out of the thumbnails to draw larger with more detail, and then pick 1 to finalize.


Ah, that's really helpful and makes a lot of sense. I've looked at some example thumb-nailing sheets and tried it out myself. I was concentrating on drawing from the shoulder for these and also keeping my posture in check.

synththumbnails.png


I'd like to follow your exercise so here's the first step. I'll pick out several of these to sketch larger in the 2-3 sketches per sheet size next.

Re: Gmay3's Sketching Journey

Postby KenoLeon » September 7th, 2015, 3:37 pm

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HI Gmay:

I couldn't figure out where the ellipse minor axis should be for the knobs. I tried to work on this a little on a separate sheet, but I'm not sure if I did it correctly or not.


I did a bunch of freehand knobs at the bar last night :

knobs01.jpg
knobs01.jpg (115.08 KiB) Viewed 1995 times


I screwed a bunch, but at the end I had a plan of attack you might use:

knobs02.jpg
knobs02.jpg (75.16 KiB) Viewed 1995 times


1. Start with a grid in perspective, here it is subdivided in equal squares, Scott Robertson goes into detail, you also need his section on mirroring offset planes.

2. The tricky part is adding space around the grid, I hope you can imagine it, but you start with 2 lines in perspective, mark your first square and some extra space next to it, then through the same subdivision trick used on .1 ( But starting the diagonals on different corners), you can duplicate and extend the surrounding space as well as the original square, from here on you can expand the grid and the buffer space ( through the same trick) on any direction.

3. once you have a grid, extend it vertically and encase your future knobs in rectangular or cube boxes, subdivide the top and bottom planes in quarters, don't connect them, but be mindful of the limits and finally draw an ellipse that touches ( is perpendicular) to the 4 subdivision points on the square, on top and bottom planes, finish by connecting the bottom ellipse with the top one,this vertical borders should sit inside the previously drawn box.

Hope that helps.

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