Re: new and confused (footwear)

Postby iab » November 16th, 2012, 10:08 am


iab
full self-realization
full self-realization
 
Posts: 1838
Joined: January 5th, 2004, 6:03 pm
TaylorWelden wrote:Good points. I suppose I'm commenting on the big picture here. Industrial Design is a design process in which the end goal is to solve a problem in product form, then that design to mass manufacturing, to then be sold in volume to public/private markets (generally speaking of course). Anything else is a craft or creating a piece of art.

I just get this a lot in my inbox and I get sick of it. "Hi, I'm going to be rich because I have a great idea. You are an Industrial Designer who make my idea happen. You just make it look good, that is all. I will pay you nothing, you get rich later, maybe if you're good and it works." This guy is saying this, but without even wanting to hire an industrial designer at all.

Its a complex process in which we make our livings at and this individual is making it seem like an Industrial Designer is simply someone who uses Illustrator. I spent a lot of hard earned money on my education and thousands of hours honing my abilities, and I still feel like I've got a long way to go to get to where I want to get to. Plus, they posted this on an Industrial Design forum, not an Adobe forum asking how to "draw cool stuff". Nope, not having it. This individual will likely make interesting drawings in Illustrator, which is great. But it is not Industrial Design.

I don't discredit lawyers, architects, doctors, or chefs at their professions. "I want to build a house, but the first thing I'm going to do is fire ALL the architects in the world." ... "Yo, Doctor, where did you buy that scalpel? Is it cool if I use last years model and just cut this tonsil out myself?" I don't want my profession to be discredited, that happens enough outside of Industrial Design forums.


I completely agree with everything you wrote. I was just giving the OP the benefit of the doubt. It seems to me English may be a second language and he wasn't clear in his (or her) intent. I didn't want to scare away a noob.

Re: new and confused (footwear)

Postby crewkid » November 16th, 2012, 11:53 am


crewkid
step four
step four
 
Posts: 471
Joined: October 19th, 2004, 8:19 pm
Location: Boston MA
To answer the OP:
"would ILLUSTRATOR CS4 be a good enough program to use for my project?"

Yes this program is good enough for your project. Illustrator is an excellent tool for creating both techpacks and product renderings, but like anything you will need to become a master of your tools. Others have recommended also using Photoshop. While Photoshop is nice you do not need it. With enough skill you can create photo renderings solely using Illustrator.

Re: new and confused (footwear)

Postby rkuchinsky » November 16th, 2012, 7:44 pm

User avatar

rkuchinsky
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 5314
Joined: July 3rd, 2005, 9:20 am
Location: Toronto, Canada
crewkid wrote:To answer the OP:
"would ILLUSTRATOR CS4 be a good enough program to use for my project?"

Yes this program is good enough for your project. Illustrator is an excellent tool for creating both techpacks and product renderings, but like anything you will need to become a master of your tools. Others have recommended also using Photoshop. While Photoshop is nice you do not need it. With enough skill you can create photo renderings solely using Illustrator.



A pencil is also great. And this new thing called paper.

R
Richard Kuchinsky / Directive Creator
http://www.rkuchinsky.com

The Directive Collective
http://www.directivecollective.com

Re: new and confused (footwear)

Postby TaylorWelden » November 17th, 2012, 4:57 pm

User avatar

TaylorWelden
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 916
Joined: August 30th, 2006, 4:38 pm
Location: Austin, TX.
rkuchinsky wrote:
crewkid wrote:To answer the OP:
"would ILLUSTRATOR CS4 be a good enough program to use for my project?"

Yes this program is good enough for your project. Illustrator is an excellent tool for creating both techpacks and product renderings, but like anything you will need to become a master of your tools. Others have recommended also using Photoshop. While Photoshop is nice you do not need it. With enough skill you can create photo renderings solely using Illustrator.



A pencil is also great. And this new thing called paper.

R


^ Where can I download those? Is there a package version available?
Taylor Welden

Industrial Designer

Industrial Design Portfolio

Re: new and confused (footwear)

Postby Lmo » November 23rd, 2012, 1:51 pm

User avatar

Lmo
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 3864
Joined: January 20th, 2004, 5:29 pm
Location: Pismo Beach, CA
So I think you both are right. We can encourage access while we advocate the value of expertise.


This is a passage from one of my favorite books; The Wheelwright's Shop. I think it may illustrate what Weldon's feeling, how a lot of us feel about our craft, about any craft for that matter, and the time in grade that it takes to become proficient. It also reminds me of the old adage, "It is a poor workman that blames his tools." It's not the tools ... it's who is using them.

First published in 1923, it's the true story of an untrained man who took over his father's wheel making business in 1884 and the "education" it took to become a Master Wheelwright. Overall it's a great read on "profession", "making", and human understanding. I actually think it should be part of formal design education.

The Wheelwright’s Shop
George Sturt
Pg. 69, Chapter XIV, Waggon-Locking

A pleasant story lingered in the shop, and was now and then told again, about an estate carpenter employed by Bishop Sumner at Farnham Castle. This man had built a new wagon in a workshop there, only to find that it was too wide to be got out of the door. And when the wagon, having been taken to pieces in the shop, was put together again in the yard, there proved to be too little room in the yard for turning it around, and it had to be got into Farnham Park for more room.

This story, I will admit, had probably been invented by a wheelwright to pour contempt upon the craft of carpenters. Certainly an idea prevailed – not wholly without justification perhaps – that while any man able to make a wheel knew enough to be a carpenter, on the other hand, a carpenter could not do wheelwright’s work, for lack of apprenticeship. In this connection a strong prejudice was felt against any causal who claimed to be a wheelwright and carpenter both. Such a pretension was almost enough in itself to prevent the wretched tramp from getting a job in my shop – would he not prove to be a Jack of all trades and Master of none? Unshapely cart-work by carpenters sometimes forced its way under my notice, and served as a warning against the employment of such men.

To return to the story of the wagon at Farnham Castle -- it illustrates a difficulty that an inexperienced man would hardly fail to meet with. To build a farm wagon that would turn round in reasonable space – something less than Farnham Park – was a problem that needed attention even in the marking out the main timbers for sawing. The trouble was that the front wheel would not ”lock” (that is turn) full circle under the wagon. For reasons no to be discussed just here the said wheels were too high, so that about half-way round the upper edges of them clashed into the body and were stopped…

How to prepare for this no carpenter could be expected to know; only by faithfully following a certain tradition could the wheelwright partially meet the difficulty.


Lew Morris
"It's what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

New to the boards? Please read before you post ->Discussion Boards Posting Standards

Previous

Return to footwear & softgoods

©2014 Core77, Inc. All rights reserved
about | contact us | advertise | mailing list