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How did they join it?

Postby beijinger19 » December 10th, 2015, 5:55 pm


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Hello!

I'm quite puzzled what is used in hem's Verso shelf? Is that some kind of beam to beam hinge?

Any clues anyone?
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Screen Shot 2015-12-10 at 22.48.17.png

Re: How did they join it?

Postby beijinger19 » December 12th, 2015, 10:00 am


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More detailed photo and a link to a vimeo

https://vimeo.com/132947893
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Screen Shot 2015-12-12 at 14.58.50.png

Re: How did they join it?

Postby KenoLeon » December 12th, 2015, 2:53 pm

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Ahh, much clearer now:

It seems to be a custom joint, let me try to reverse engineer it :

1. So you start with indentations on the wood onto which you glue or otherwise affix your custom biscuits ( The metal or though plastic black bits you see in your picture )

2. I say is custom, because you have certain compression,tension and axial forces you already know, and you want it to be in that shape because you want to collapse the structure in 2 and make it easy to assemble, in any case the forces or sliding you want avoid are represented by the arrows.

3. The upper part (A) snaps with the bottom part (my sketch is a slightly different joint, but should give you an idea of what to look for ), and prevents sliding in the above mentioned directions, I believe you can still disassemble Miko Halonens one by rocking it back and forth and releasing the engaging teeth, but it's just a guess.

TentacleJoint.jpg
TentacleJoint.jpg (56.13 KiB) Viewed 3482 times



In the first picture you posted, I believe the mechanism is different, some push and slide metal fastener.

[vimeo]http://vimeo.com/128463750[/vimeo]

I used/ am fascinated by joinery of all types and it really is easy to figure out or come up with your own if you know about structural engineering a bit (look into Japanese joinery as well) ; run to the book store and get a copy of :

Structures: Or Why Things Don't Fall Down by j.e. Gordon


-K
Eugenio (Keno) Leon
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Re: How did they join it?

Postby beijinger19 » December 12th, 2015, 7:15 pm


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KenoLeon

Thank you for your reply.

Sorry for two different videos, I guess they have not updated some sections of their website. Previously there was a slide-in system and then they changed it to click-in.

Thank you for expanation! It is really helpful. So your suggestion is that they custom made it somewhere? I still believe that type of connector is commercially available.

So far I've found this one form knapp.
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knapp knock in connector.jpg
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Re: How did they join it?

Postby KenoLeon » December 13th, 2015, 2:34 pm

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beijinger19 wrote:So your suggestion is that they custom made it somewhere? I still believe that type of connector is commercially available.
So far I've found this one form knapp.


Yes, I am inclined to think it is custom made for the project since the collapsed ladder edges also carry loads ( vertical forces in this case ) in conjunction with the fastener ( which deals mostly with perpendicular/axial forces ) , but again only he/they know for sure.

If you have a specific project in mind you are welcome to post it, me or someone else might be able to steer you in the right direction.

Regards
Keno
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Re: How did they join it?

Postby beijinger19 » December 14th, 2015, 8:49 am


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Keno,

Please see my sketch below. I'm making wall leaning furniture thing and it will be split in two pieces.

My initial idea was to use two bolts, but ideally I'm looking to a solution where people could assemble it without using any tools.

The load of the beam in the upper area would be around 30kg. Materials is American Ash.

Thank you!
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IMG_0058.jpg

Re: How did they join it?

Postby KenoLeon » December 14th, 2015, 3:05 pm

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Hi Beijinger :

Couple of points:

- In the end you are the one that knows what's right for your project, your solution seems fine for a prototype, so I would go ahead and do that and see what you learn. ( you can knock out a scale model out of balsa in an afternoon)

- To offer the consumer the ability to assemble it without any tools is going to incur in additional costs both in development and custom hardware.

Specifically and without more details I see a few options: a more complex splice joint ( subject to you being able to produce it) , custom hardware biscuits ( 3d printed or cast ) , moving the joint to the base (ie redesigning ).

Good luck
Keno
Eugenio (Keno) Leon
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"Go where you are celebrated, not merely tolerated"

Re: How did they join it?

Postby beijinger19 » December 29th, 2015, 7:04 pm


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Ok I found out what it is. It is lamello buscuit joint system, quite expansive but I've heard people complaining about this shelf. It will get loose with time unless you glue it.


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